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  Topic Review (Newest First)
10-20-2014 10:08 PM
tonicusa I know Nev Lapwood from SA, he is a good dude. Aside from his videos on tricks and park his personal riding style is really on point. Like surfing you want to find people whose technique is good, but whose personal style you relate to. You aren't going to find too many guys with a better riding style to cop than Nev's. And all you have to do is email him and he will send you pointers and have you send him iPhone videos of yourself to critique. It's the quickest way to really improving aside from a local instructor you like.
10-20-2014 09:59 PM
chomps1211 Here are those techniques described in a more extreme manner for doing some harder carves! But you can see what the guys were talking bout with the hips, hump & dump!

10-20-2014 09:54 PM
radiomuse210
Quote:
Originally Posted by chomps1211 View Post

About 1:30 in starts talking about engaging edges! The hip movements these guys are talking about in this thread are a little more subtle in practice than they sound when written out. (…at least until you really start Mach-ing down the hill anyway!) I'm a visual learner. reading a lot of instruction doesn't help me too much. At least not until I've experienced it some and can better understand the descriptions.

Watch some vids and get a feel for what people are talking about when they say bend the knees & drive your shins into your boots, pushing hips forward.

Highly recommend their beginner, learning to ride tutorials!
I'm the same way...I can quickly memorize book stuff but when it comes to mathy things (like what I'm dealing with in my course work now...) reading through what I have to do with data doesn't make a bit of sense to me. Once I start doing it myself, I'll pick right up on it and understand it. Snowboarding was kind of the same way. Watching someone is way more helpful than just listening to someone describe it. And doing it for myself is even better. Some people learn things quicker by reading and listening to descriptions. Others through visual presentation. And others by doing it while being taught.
10-20-2014 09:50 PM
chomps1211
About 1:30 in starts talking about engaging edges! The hip movements these guys are talking about in this thread are a little more subtle in practice than they sound when written out. (…at least until you really start Mach-ing down the hill anyway!) I'm a visual learner. reading a lot of instruction doesn't help me too much. At least not until I've experienced it some and can better understand the descriptions.

Watch some vids and get a feel for what people are talking about when they say bend the knees & drive your shins into your boots, pushing hips forward.

Highly recommend their beginner, learning to ride tutorials!
10-20-2014 09:41 PM
MGD81
Quote:
Originally Posted by GrizzlyBeast View Post
Oh wow ...I just went back to page 2 and read your advice. Are you even serious? What planet are you on? DId you even read what level the OP is at? You know it all buttholes are all the same. "Look at how much I know....see look what I taught you!" GTFO. Go read the OP...that kid has no idea what language you are speaking. Did you know that you can learn how people learn? Now you do. Go and learn how people learn...and how they literally hear almost none of the words that you say and if they do they dont even understand or grasp them. Go home.
Facts:

1. I don't know it all.

2. I know way more than you.

A quick question:

If I take a lesson from you, how are you going to improve my riding if I cant hear or understand anything you say?
10-20-2014 09:24 PM
radiomuse210
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGD81 View Post
"counter rotating" isn't the same as riding across the hill on your toe edge out of alignment, FYI.
Right, I know...I think what was in my head got bungled up when I put it into words. And in my reply, I was talking to Grizz while quoting you...I made it confusing.
10-20-2014 09:12 PM
GrizzlyBeast
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGD81 View Post
You haven't got a clue what you're talking about.

Plenty of good advice in this thread, until you posted. The OP is having trouble extending his hips, nothing in there about being rotated. Looking up the hill isn't going to help is it.

Oh wow ...I just went back to page 2 and read your advice. Are you even serious? What planet are you on? DId you even read what level the OP is at? You know it all buttholes are all the same. "Look at how much I know....see look what I taught you!" GTFO. Go read the OP...that kid has no idea what language you are speaking. Did you know that you can learn how people learn? Now you do. Go and learn how people learn...and how they literally hear almost none of the words that you say and if they do they dont even understand or grasp them. Go home.
10-20-2014 08:50 PM
GrizzlyBeast Really man? The OP hasnt even developed the odd calf muscles it takes to balance on a toe edge while carving...or the neurological connections that need to be made in order to send signals to those fast twitch muscles in order to balance. He doesnt need to be thinking about where his hips are or how much his knees are bent. GUess what...his body will naturally learn to do those things properly in the most efficient way possible if hes given room to grow....Not some overbearing way too much instruction asshole breathing down his neck telling them what they are doing wrong. Remember this guy is a BEGINNER. The more complicated you make things the more frustrated and fail the person will feel. You dont know what you are talking about. I would imagine you are not much fun at the slopes.
10-20-2014 08:05 PM
MGD81 "counter rotating" isn't the same as riding across the hill on your toe edge out of alignment, FYI.
10-20-2014 07:51 PM
radiomuse210
Quote:
Originally Posted by MGD81 View Post
You haven't got a clue what you're talking about.

Plenty of good advice in this thread, until you posted. The OP is having trouble extending his hips, nothing in there about being rotated. Looking up the hill isn't going to help is it.
While it is good advice to make sure your body isn't counter rotating...the piss on your board stuff WILL help someone understand the how they are supposed to be positioning their hips/legs. Someone described it to me as a Michael Jackson hip thrust haha...pushing the knees down into the boot and snow while doing that push in the hips like he does when he pops onto his toes. It helped A LOT because I learned with no formal lessons (I know, I know...I ended up having to break some bad habits in that first season ie. ruddering) and this helped me understand what I was supposed to be doing with my lower body on a toeside turn. Heelside is pretty straight forward for the most part. Then as you get better, you can start to hone in on the more subtle movements that makes linking turns and eventually carving really work.
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