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  Topic Review (Newest First)
06-19-2014 06:17 PM
ekb18c DC boots are great for me as the top and bottom are separate and they are a little bit wider in the toe cap area. I have some what of a wide feet so the DC are great. However, some people may complain that it's too wide.
06-19-2014 05:06 PM
Manicmouse A good thing I was taught when buying boots that has helped me is to have your toes touching the end of the boots when standing straight and when you squat they will slide back a little and not touch the end.

Toes should never be squished against the end, so when I say touch I mean only that.
06-19-2014 08:43 AM
zpedalkin OK, will try to check out a few local stores to try some boots.

Will try DC Gizmo first (separate top and bottom adjustability), then Burton Imperial (seems to get good reviews, but is reportedly stiff, which I'm assuming isn't good for a beginner), then anything else they have after that

Would be a lot easier to find and match up the entire 'package' in a store, but unfortunately I have a similar problem to kosmoz where my local stores have a tendency to charge double of what I can get online. I should be able to find some stores to try the boots though.
06-19-2014 07:24 AM
neni
Quote:
Originally Posted by kosmoz View Post
* Upper and lower zone adjustment is A MUST. Duoble boa, double fast lacing or lashes.
.
Careful her. If you look up "double boa" boot you may won't get what you look for...
E.g. K2 has two boas but one boa for the inner boot and one boa for the outer boot. There's no upper and lower zone adjustment there. Same same but different...
06-19-2014 04:02 AM
kosmoz Most things, which is absolutely true, didn't fit my and my closest friend case At first I bought Salomon Faction boots online, they were pretty much OK, but too soft for my liking and maybe one or half a size to big and the worst part was that I could not adjust upper and lower boot independently. Gave these Salomons for my brother and bought Northwave Decade SL, a size smaller and they were perfect for me. Perfect size, stiffness I like, very good built quality and I can adjust lower and upper part of boot independently. Off course I looked at specs and reviews, was looking for true sizing and normal feet width boots. Was buying without trying on because in Lithuania we have very few snow shops with very few brands and very high prices, so I took the risk of buying online.

My brother didn't like Salomon Factions, because of the same inability to adjust upper and lower boot tightness and they were too soft for him since, maybe, second or third day of snowboarding, when he started to learn new things and charge harder and ride faster. And he went to snowboarding after skiing some years, so maybe he is used to stiff boots.

A friend, who started snowboarding the same day as my brother went with Nitro Team TLS, which are stiff boots, maybe even stiffer than mine Northwave Decades, learned very quickly and is very satisfied with these boots.

So my opinion would be:
* try as many, as you can
* Boot should be snug, but no pressure points
* Upper and lower zone adjustment is A MUST. Duoble boa, double fast lacing or lashes.
* Don't neglect stiff boots. You always can leave some looseness and have softer feel, but you will never be able to make soft boot stiff.
06-19-2014 03:29 AM
Anticrobotic First of all, welcome to the forums!

I'll mainly re-iterate what others have already written to give it a little more emphasis.

1) Boots first. Seriously. It's been said over and over but the boots are the single most important gear you'll be wearing. Don't rush it, read up, and be prepared to spend a lot of time trying different boots. It'll save you a lot of pain and frustration on the hill. Maybe you're lucky, having a perfectly average foot without any problems, and you'll just stick your feet in a pair of Burton Moto (the world's most sold snowboard boot) and go "check!". Or maybe you have really fucked up feet like I do, trying 32 different models before being able to settle on something really good. Don't listen to anyone telling you to buy this brand or that. They don't have your feet. Oh, and make sure they boots are tight without pressure points.
2) Buy protective gear. Seriously.
3) Take some snowboarding classes.
4) When you have a boot that you're sure suits you - which you have confirmed on the hill - you can go for bindings. The most important thing there is that the bindings fit the boot well. You don't want a binding that is either to big or too small or deforms the boot.
5) And THEN you go for a board. A board that fits the bindings, your foot size, your weight, and your experience. Since you've probably not yet evolved in any direction it'll probably be an All Mountain board.

I know. It's fun to own your own board. But buying one first thing you'll more or less be guaranteed to be looking for another one after a while. And not owning your own board will actually "force" you into the pleasure of trying different boards before deciding on what you like.
06-19-2014 12:40 AM
kosmoz I have put my brother and a friend on Salomon sabotages, both were newbies with one day on the mountain on rental board, and they both did great, no struggle, just great time. It's described as board for intermediate to expert, but beginers are OK with it. It has some speed, maybe this is the reason, why it's not for beginers, because it is very easy and fun to ride.
06-18-2014 11:13 PM
zpedalkin
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatanka Head View Post
Back to the GoPro, have you asked your family about how they felt when they watched the videos? Have you thought about getting a drone? You should. Then you don't have to worry about anything at all. You can also spy on your neighbors with a drone. And attack fundamental christians at funerals. We are a community that is looking out for your best interest.
I don't want to sound rude, but what my family thought about my gopro footage doesn't concern you in the slightest. The rest of your message is pretty random. Please refrain from posting any further views on how I should use my gopro here, as it's not what I came here for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by vandy16 View Post
Definitely spend some time on boots, you'll want to get to a shop and try on as many as possible, make sure you find something that fits perfectly and is comfortable. As far as bindings, the burton customs should be a pretty good binding for you, and if you do some searching pretty sure you can get this year's model for under $100. Definitely go for this year's model though, as they made some nice additions, mainly the Re:Flex disc. Another pretty good beginner/intermediate binding would be the K2 Indy, which can be had at a nice price as well, and if you're kind of a K2 fan you might like it.

As far as boards, heard a lot of good things about the K2 Raygun, as far as it being a good board for beginners but also something you can definitely grow into. Aside from that, I've had great luck with Rossignol boards lately, particularly the Taipan, which is a mid-flexing directional twin, pretty forgiving board. If you're looking for something more twin shaped/freestyle oriented, I really love my Flow Era, which is a pretty forgiving mostly rockered board with a nice medium flex.

Lots of deals out there now, so it's a great time to buy. Good luck,

Rob
This is very helpful - thanks Rob. Just had a quick look at K2 Raygun - looks pretty similar to YES Basic, except that it's flat between the feet as opposed to camber. Any idea what kind of differences I would expect due to this? Would I have more difficulty with camber? I like that the Raygun is also a twin, which means I'll be able to use it to learn switch at some point when I'm ready. I'll look into the other ones you mentioned also.
06-18-2014 04:59 PM
Manicmouse Enough with the helmet cam hate, as long as they're not posting 30 min 1st person Youtube clips it's all good.

Who called the GoPro police
06-18-2014 12:56 PM
vandy16 Definitely spend some time on boots, you'll want to get to a shop and try on as many as possible, make sure you find something that fits perfectly and is comfortable. As far as bindings, the burton customs should be a pretty good binding for you, and if you do some searching pretty sure you can get this year's model for under $100. Definitely go for this year's model though, as they made some nice additions, mainly the Re:Flex disc. Another pretty good beginner/intermediate binding would be the K2 Indy, which can be had at a nice price as well, and if you're kind of a K2 fan you might like it.

As far as boards, heard a lot of good things about the K2 Raygun, as far as it being a good board for beginners but also something you can definitely grow into. Aside from that, I've had great luck with Rossignol boards lately, particularly the Taipan, which is a mid-flexing directional twin, pretty forgiving board. If you're looking for something more twin shaped/freestyle oriented, I really love my Flow Era, which is a pretty forgiving mostly rockered board with a nice medium flex.

Lots of deals out there now, so it's a great time to buy. Good luck,

Rob
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