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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-10-2014 08:38 PM
Manicmouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyDragon View Post
Yah, spring riding would be the obvious problem, but then, the warmer temperatures usually make falls not hurt as much as the cold I find.

I think you would have to go with a thin polyester or merino wool base layer, the body armour, and then just a lined shell.
I've been wearing Under Armour Coldgear as my base layer and I'm going to switch to a light/mid weight merino next season.
Yeah we get a lot of ice during a season as our temperatures don't usually get low enough to prevent melt during the day. We also get high winds which scrape off pow.... Talking North Island NZ here
07-10-2014 06:41 PM
GreyDragon
Quote:
Originally Posted by Manicmouse View Post
I ride really hot being an unfit bastard and usually wear just a t-shirt under a regular jacket. I'm guessing I'll need to go to a shell if I was to get something like the D30.

Are there any temps you overheat in with that on? Spring riding?
Yah, spring riding would be the obvious problem, but then, the warmer temperatures usually make falls not hurt as much as the cold I find.

I think you would have to go with a thin polyester or merino wool base layer, the body armour, and then just a lined shell.
I've been wearing Under Armour Coldgear as my base layer and I'm going to switch to a light/mid weight merino next season.
07-10-2014 03:02 PM
Manicmouse
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreyDragon View Post
BTW, I wear one of these jackets all the time I'm riding now. I treat it as a mid layer underneath a shell jacket.
I ride really hot being an unfit bastard and usually wear just a t-shirt under a regular jacket. I'm guessing I'll need to go to a shell if I was to get something like the D30.

Are there any temps you overheat in with that on? Spring riding?
07-10-2014 02:40 PM
GreyDragon Just curious, how heavy are these things?

I have a POC Spine VPD 2.0 Jacket I have used riding. It is serious protection, and I would recommend it to anyone - except that it is somewhat heavy. As a result, I purchased the new Demon Flex Force X D3O V2 jacket last year. Similar protection as the POC, but not as heavy (the back protection is notably thinner than the POC but still good imo).

I'm just curious how cumbersome you guys find the ones you wear.
I assume you're okay with the tradeoff between added weight and protection?

BTW, I wear one of these jackets all the time I'm riding now. I treat it as a mid layer underneath a shell jacket.
07-10-2014 07:18 AM
Kevin137
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGboarder View Post
Are there safety standards for snowboarding body armor?
The only standards that I have seen are for motorcycle protection - and both the Forcefield and the Demon have the same EN1621-1 certification/approval for that.
there are different grades to "armor" and it is all too do with the impact they are capable of taking and how it disperses it, i posted the videos with how they grade it earlier, and the highest rating you can get is what forcefield provide, but again they have different grades for different products...

So 1 is a lower rating than 2, and you would want something with an EN-1621-2 really, one is protection but a much lower rating... They only grade 1 and 2, but using the scales they have for measurement, then they could actually have a 3 or 4 in todays markets...

Quote:
WHAT DO THE EN NUMBERS ON OUR PRODUCT REFER TO?
EN1621-2:2003: Level 1
EN1621-2:2003: Level 2
"Motorcyclist's protective clothing against mechanical impacts - Part 2: Motorcyclists back protectors"- "Requirements and test methods": Level 1 and Level 2
EN1621-2:1998: Level 1
EN1621-2:1998: Level 2
As above but now replaced by 2003 version EN1621-2 relates only to back protectors. The impact energy used in the test is 50 joules. If the transmitted force recorded after the impact is between 9 KiloNewtons and 18 KiloNewtons it can be classified as a Level 1 Back protector or insert.
If the transmitted force recorded is below 9 KiloNewtons then it can be classified as a Level 2 Back protector or insert. The lower the transmitted force in KiloNewtons the more protective the product is. Our current Pro Sub 4 back protector currently transmits about 3.38 KiloNewtons which is outstanding.
EN1621-1:1997
"Motorcyclists protective clothing against mechanical impact - Part 1: Requirements and test methods for impact protectors"
There is only one performance level according to this standard. It requires that given a 50 Joule impact the protector doesn't transmit a mean figure greater than 35 KiloNewtons. You may come across Type B, Type A and CE Type protectors. Type A and Type B refer only to the size, shape or coverage. All our protectors are Type B which means they meet the Type B template for coverage within the standard. Type A is a much smaller template more suited to children's sizing. CE sizing refers to full CE Motorcycle Clothing where the armour size relates to the garment size. Instead of one size fits all the armour coverage increases through the size range
EN14021:2003
"Stone shields for off road motorcycling suited to protect riders against stones and debris- Requirements and test methods"
This is to do with coverage mainly on the stone shield which protects against lofted stones and debris. The higher level of performance comes from integrating EN1621-1 and EN1621- 2 within the product as Forcefield have done with the Extreme Harness.
EN13277-2:2000 Clause 4.4
"Motorcyclist's protective clothing against mechanical impacts - Part 2: Motorcyclists Back protectors"- "Requirements and test methods" and with the coverage requirements of clause 4.4 ("zone of protection") of EN13277-2:2000 "Protective equipment for martial arts - Part 3: Additional requirements and test methods for trunk protectors"
This specifically relates to sizing/ coverage not impact on the Rib protectors for martial arts.
EN13595-1:2002
"Protective clothing for professional motorcycle riders -Jackets, trousers and one piece or divided suits -Part 1: General requirements" (Annex B- "Determination of clothing restraint"). This standard looks at not only the protective content of a product but takes into account the construction and whether the garment is designed to withstand the impact. If the product disintegrates during a fall it will be of no use. The garment should be designed to ensure that the armour stays in place to do the job that it is required to do.
EN340:2003
"Protective clothing - General requirements "The part we use is connected to chemical safety. This is a series of tests that ensure that the materials and components we use do not in themselves cause harm to the body. For instance some products in the market could contain banned substances/chemicals that could be harmful to the user.
So you can see there sub 4, would rate of twice or more the protection required to meet the s=current requirements for 2, making it the most protective back protector on the market. And a far higher rated product but the same rating as lesser products...

The flite that i use, is rated with 2 ratings, these ratings are for back and chest...

Quote:
EN1621-2:2003 (Level 2) Back Protection & EN1621-1:2003 (Level 1) Chest Protection
07-09-2014 09:17 PM
NovoRei
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGboarder View Post
Are there safety standards for snowboarding body armor?
The only standards that I have seen are for motorcycle protection - and both the Forcefield and the Demon have the same EN1621-1 certification/approval for that.
It's worth noting that the certificate is for the components used by Demon.

I don't think there's a standard for an "armor".
07-09-2014 07:40 AM
larrytbull
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGboarder View Post
That looks like significantly less coverage than my Demon jacket.

For rails I would definitely want something like the Demon products - I have the D3O one (which works similarly to the Forcefield in dispersing/absorbing impact) but I think the Pro has similar coverage.

One thing that I do not like about the Demon is that the D3O pads are not removable (but the rib protection 'blades' and the spine armor pieces are), so you need to wash the jacket with those bulky pads. I believe that is not an issue with the hard protection Pro version.
Correct, the hard pads are all removable for washing.
07-09-2014 07:06 AM
Kevin137
Quote:
Originally Posted by SGboarder View Post
That looks like significantly less coverage than my Demon jacket.

For rails I would definitely want something like the Demon products - I have the D3O one (which works similarly to the Forcefield in dispersing/absorbing impact) but I think the Pro has similar coverage.

One thing that I do not like about the Demon is that the D3O pads are not removable (but the rib protection 'blades' and the spine armor pieces are), so you need to wash the jacket with those bulky pads. I believe that is not an issue with the hard protection Pro version.
That looks cool, but i can find no info on safety ratings, do they grade there protection...?

Taking there word for something working is not something i would do, and if it is not rated, then i would not buy it... Hehe
07-07-2014 11:33 AM
Kevin137 They list distributors not shops, so shops are harder to find, but there seems to be loads of stockists, so i would imagine you could find one near you.

Try motorbike clothing shops as well, they seem to be more likely to carry the stuff there...
07-07-2014 10:12 AM
slyder Kevin I/we have done the present thing in the past as well. Especially on big ticket items. Usually for the kids and often combined with grandparents contribution.

Only issue here is there are only 3 ppl that carry this item in the USA and they are all 3000 miles away.
I will keep looking to see if someone more local carries Forcefield but from their website I only see 3 retailers and again none are near me.
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