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Thread: How to get rid of a bad habit? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-02-2014 02:00 PM
elstinky
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
Only thing that I've found that helps a bit is to practice turning an predetermined times rather than spots. Ie count 1,2,3...1,2,3 turning on every 3 not matter what is under my feet.
Bit late to chime in maybe, but cannot stress enough how much this helped me last season. (pretty sure I read the tip on this forum as well btw) Had vids of me doing whatever I used do, then some where I was using the counting and the difference was
Depending on how wide/steep the terrain is I sometimes count just 1,2 cause 3 would end me up in the trees or worse and 1,2,3,4 or more when there's plenty of room :]
10-29-2014 12:07 PM
Lamps Use the bat signal

S
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F
10-29-2014 11:44 AM
wrathfuldeity
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tatanka Head View Post
This is a good thread to revisit. As I'm mentally preparing for the upcoming season I want to focus on cleaning up my riding. Might do a lesson (probably not...I always say I will, but can't find the time )

I third the dropping-in comparison. At my local I have one steep and narrow run that I like to avoid. My riding partner doesn't mind this run, and since it takes us to a more remote lift we often find ourselves on it. I basically pull style out of my ass when I ride it. Heavy on the lead foot and clean, tight turns. The intimidation usually comes from the two rock walls on both sides, and the line of skiers waiting to drop in. I don't mind eating shit, but I don't want to do it into a rock wall while in front of a bunch of skiers. This is my motivation to get through it as quickly and cleanly as possible. And it works.

On open steeps, I'm wide and loose. Relaxed and possibly sloppy.

I might have the opposite problem of you, Neni. I need to clean up my game a little.
I use to feel that way...but now...fuck it/huck it...I am going to destroy the line before those pussy skiers get in my way and I don't mind eating shit to do it...yup style right out of my ass.
10-29-2014 08:43 AM
Tatanka Head This is a good thread to revisit. As I'm mentally preparing for the upcoming season I want to focus on cleaning up my riding. Might do a lesson (probably not...I always say I will, but can't find the time )

I third the dropping-in comparison. At my local I have one steep and narrow run that I like to avoid. My riding partner doesn't mind this run, and since it takes us to a more remote lift we often find ourselves on it. I basically pull style out of my ass when I ride it. Heavy on the lead foot and clean, tight turns. The intimidation usually comes from the two rock walls on both sides, and the line of skiers waiting to drop in. I don't mind eating shit, but I don't want to do it into a rock wall while in front of a bunch of skiers. This is my motivation to get through it as quickly and cleanly as possible. And it works.

On open steeps, I'm wide and loose. Relaxed and possibly sloppy.

I might have the opposite problem of you, Neni. I need to clean up my game a little.
10-29-2014 08:07 AM
speedjason sometimes, you just gotta ride it out.
10-28-2014 09:09 PM
SkullAndXbones even though this is an older-ish thread, i will say that my first thought, too, was that it might be psychological. steep and narrow can be scary if you're not used to riding it. unfortunately i don't think there's really a way to build up to it by going down small narrow trails because that's still in your comfort zone. it's just one of those things where you kinda have to just say screw it and throw caution to the wind and just do it. when i ride steep and narrow trails, that are too steep to where i'm not comfortable going straight down, i just do small quick carves. basically just leaning back and forth a bit.
10-28-2014 08:48 PM
TimelessDescent
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
If it's only on steep and narrow, not on steep and wide, it might be strictly psychological. You're less confident in that area, so you "lean back", both figuratively and literally. With your weight off your front foot, you have to throw your weight around to get the steering.

I have a number of areas where I get freaked out and lean back. The way I handle it is to deliberately go into those areas and consciously keep my weight forward. Do it as slow as possible a couple of times, then gradually ramp it up, but if I lean back, I start over.

Pretty much 100% accurate. Dropping into a halfpipe is a more extreme example, but its the same idea. You have to commit or you wont be riding with the same weight distribution over your board which will cause you to lose control. Thats of course easier said than done. The first time I was rewarded with the benefits of letting go was finally saying to myself screw it and going for it. No technique or this or that. It was all mental. I was just sick of hesitating. With that said...I still find myself in plenty of situations hesitating even though I know what to do.
09-03-2014 08:58 AM
chomps1211
Quote:
Originally Posted by neni View Post
Thanks to all for the input.

Well, natural reaction of someone very hesitant maybe. I’ve seen how the SO did ride the same spots. Fluent. No counter-rotation. Well… also half the number of time and turns . I’ve just takes from my cam, which won’t help a lot (you just see waving arms and a board).
Ahhh,… OK! From the way you described becoming aware of the issue, I presumed you had some video from another viewpoint showing yourself using the bad form you were looking to work on.

As for your SO? Sounds like he was using CassMT's method for navigating that terrain!
09-03-2014 08:46 AM
neni Thanks to all for the input.
Quote:
Originally Posted by chomps1211 View Post
It may be, as some have already stated, that it is simply a natural reaction to riding the type of terrain you are describing.
Well, natural reaction of someone very hesitant maybe. I’ve seen how the SO did ride the same spots. Fluent. No counter-rotation. Well… also half the number of time and turns . I’ve just takes from my cam, which won’t help a lot (you just see waving arms and a board).
Quote:
Originally Posted by slyder View Post
As to your question, now that you know the type of terrain that you have the issue with I think this is where you need to really turn up the concentration since you describe it as almost sub-consciously
Haha, you're right in a way... tho I grant I was super concentrated, but more on the surrounding than on me (oh, mind the rocks, mind your speed, mind the sluff, don't follow the fall line, stay right of the shrund - you don’t see it but it’s there, btw, which side is right uhm…, mind the radio, oh mind the ice over there, and for heaven’s sake don't fall). So I was pretty occupied with all that info and trying to pick a nice line, I guess, there was no brain cell left for concentration on my technique .

I’m used to ride terrain I can see or I know each inch. So there’s only a limited number of things to mind. The shitty snow conditions together with the unfamiliar steepness and all the factors to mind being on glaciated terrain was a new level.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonicusa View Post
Practice proper body position on moguls or other challenging terrain as a warmup.
Hmmm… I actually almost like to ride moguls… they’re a good exercise for concentration and timing. Tho I hardly use the upper body and ride them with the legs mainly. And I’d say I pretty much permanently ride with open shoulders - and hips… maybe due to the +/+ angles...

But I guess I have a clue now… it all comes together, bit of everything. Lack of experience leads to lack of confidence leads to lack of proper technique. Staring down the fall line, too distracted by the surrounding, maybe bit in the back seat, and probably too slow, so without the help of the upper body I had no chance to throw the board around quick enough at slow speed on a short turn in 50°. Gonna mind some more things next time

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
Only thing that I've found that helps a bit is to practice turning an predetermined times rather than spots. Ie count 1,2,3...1,2,3 turning on every 3 not matter what is under my feet. It helps me to focus back to terrain that I'm moving toward rather than what is on the fall line below me.
Funny you mention this. I’ve practiced the very same thing on groomers to make the leg/feet movements independent from the glace scanning the terrain. Hmmm… need to scan our mountain for something steeper/more challenging to further exercise.

Quote:
Originally Posted by snowklinger View Post
I quit smoking cigarettes by smoking 3x as much weed.
If you know how much weed I already smoked, thats some work son.
you're welcome.
4. Profit
LOL. I see what you've done there
09-03-2014 08:18 AM
CassMT the proper technique for steep and narrow is to don't turn at all, problem solved

internet answer/
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