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Thread: Will this board work ok for me? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
01-22-2016 05:02 PM
Scramble
What model board is this?

Rossignol 162 "______" I believe it's a 1996 model. I have been told it's the 'Cob' and 'The Tin Man'. I'm hoping to get this cleared up and maybe where to find appraisal. Here's a link to a pic-
https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resi...nt=photo%2cjpg


Thank You
12-09-2010 04:34 PM
VESPADADDY I'm in good shape as far as instruction, as a local instructor from an online motorcycle board is going to hook me up with a free lesson. He might also have a more modern board that fits my (low) budget. Win Win Win!
12-09-2010 02:12 PM
Lupin
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeR View Post
Having friends give you tips is a lesson, just not a paid one. If your friends know what they're talking about and will spend time with you on the hill, I would agree this is a fine way to get started. If not, as a former snowboard beginner , I think a getting a lesson from a good instructor is very useful, indeed crucial.
Hahaha. Well I am sure people on here will give tips! But yes, like I said people have different experiences. I did not find a lesson altogether useful but it doesn't mean you won't. But I definitely would not say its CRUCIAL for everyone.
12-09-2010 01:54 PM
JoeR
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lupin View Post
As a former ski and snowboard instructor I probably shouldn't say this BUT I don't think its that useful to go to a lesson as an absolute beginner, you really just need to get a feel for the board and boarding and your friends can give you tips.
Having friends give you tips is a lesson, just not a paid one. If your friends know what they're talking about and will spend time with you on the hill, I would agree this is a fine way to get started. If not, as a former snowboard beginner , I think a getting a lesson from a good instructor is very useful, indeed crucial.
12-09-2010 01:45 PM
Lupin I do not know about most people here but when I first learned to snowboard (with my school in grade 6) it took me a good 8 times out to finally be able to link my turns and make it down the whole hill without falling. Within the first 4 times I could toe-side turn but did not feel very comfortable on my heel-side. I think it took 6 times to link turns and be comfortable and 8 times before I could really start laying into the edge and feel like I wasn't going to fall (and to start to go fast). Once I was really comfortable I found the transition from simple linked turns to carving was pretty quick and straightforward. For me 8 times out=8 weeks (with the school program) and then the next year I went to Jay Peak and was comfortable enough going down the blacks at Jay, but I wouldn't have done that my first year.

But I might have been a slow learner, I know people that picked it up in about 3 weeks (3 times out). I was always a little scared to fall (it is soooo sudden when you catch an edge-absolutely nothing like falling on skis, which I don't care about). And I found people that took a more aggresive approach to learning tended to learn faster.

As a former ski and snowboard instructor I probably shouldn't say this BUT I don't think its that useful to go to a lesson as an absolute beginner, you really just need to get a feel for the board and boarding and your friends can give you tips. But that is really just my experience. I am sure other people will have different experiences. For me I found the lesson really helped when I was already able to link turns and the instructor was telling me how to board more aggresively.
12-09-2010 01:23 PM
JoeR Then I say, go for it. Just ride it. This is not the sort of setup I would choose for myself, or recommend to a beginner, but heck -- it's totally free. Try it out for a while and take some lessons. Once you make a bit of progress you can decide about purchasing a better, more up-to-date board and fresher boots.
12-09-2010 12:25 PM
VESPADADDY I've got the Burton UniDisc, and yup, they'll fit.
12-09-2010 12:05 PM
JoeR
Quote:
Originally Posted by VESPADADDY View Post
Does this board setup look adequate for a beginning boarder? I was able to put this setup together for free, as one friend gave me the boots and bindings (Burton Mission bindings and Moto Boots), and another buddy gave me this Rossignol board.
Will you be able to mount the bindings on the board? Burton bindings (non-EST) use a three-hole insert pattern. Your Rossi board has a four-hole pattern. Did the bindings come with an alternative, four-hole adapter disc?
12-09-2010 11:47 AM
TLN That's closer to the true =)

You will get a lot of fun, if you freinds doesn't ride fast. Be ready to fall all the time for 2-3 days.
I think it doesn't matter if it got a wood core or not. You won't feel the difference.

Cons of this setup(IMO):
1. Boots. Modern boots offer more comfort, and that's the main thing. You contact the board with your feet. Also this may not give enought hold.
2. Binders. All the same. All about hold and response.
3. Board edges. They must be sharp enough, eve for the newbie.
4. Board response. Hard to explain, but modern board are more predictable.
12-09-2010 11:24 AM
VESPADADDY
terminology

I'm concerned that my terminology is a bit off. All I'm looking to do is ride down, in control, being able to turn and go where I want to go. I *am* expecting to be able to pick this up and learn at an average pace, but I'm not expecting to be great at it right away.

That said, I'm pretty sure I'll be willing to fall down enough times to eventually get the hang of boarding. I think perhaps what I should have said was 'cruising'. I don't plan to ride down black diamond runs or anything, I just want to cruise down the hill with my friends and have a little fun.

I know that people will generally suggest that I buy something more modern, but I'm most interested in knowing *why* this particular board is too old to be a decent choice to learn/cruise on.

I was told that this board does NOT have a wood core--it's a Rossignol that's about 12 years old. That's all I know about it.

Thanks for the previous (and any subsequent) feedback.
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