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12-20-2010 12:22 PM
rasmasyean
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
And tied to a wench?...she must be really strong.........

cool! Is that a scan of a porno mag from you childhood Snowolf?
12-20-2010 11:34 AM
HoboMaster That picture is so priceless, Lol.
12-20-2010 11:08 AM
HoboMaster
Quote:
Originally Posted by rasmasyean View Post
That is, groomers (or rather, packed because at a certain steepness, it's not groomable I don't think)
Most resorts don't, but at mine they have a double black diamond off the face of one of the bowls that they groom with a wenched cat,(the grooming cat is hooked to a cable at the top of the bowl, allowing it to groomer super steep terrain).

That run is the bomb after a nice grooming, (it can be sketchy when it's icey).
12-19-2010 03:11 PM
Jeklund
Quote:
Originally Posted by rasmasyean View Post
The reason why is that powder (if ridden on at least) is more variable and bumpy with unpredictable pack density (is that a term?). Thus I have found that my board goes all over the place more and I have to constantly adjust for chaotic terrain and tire out my legs. I don't know when I'm actually going to accelerate or decellerate and sometimes even inadvertantly come to a stop....which throws off my rythm.
Ride some fresh powder that actually has some depth to it and I'm sure you will change that statement. When you get a good dump of the stuff it covers up most of the bumps and therefore makes a smooth ride. Not only that but on the steeps it helps keep your speed down which ends up being one less thing to worry about. Also on a steep groomer if you fall its pretty difficult to get back up if you start sliding as you have nothing to help you slow down, in powder you just fall into a pile of snow which doesn't hurt and gives you something to slow down with.
12-19-2010 01:34 PM
rasmasyean
Quote:
Originally Posted by HoboMaster View Post
What are you talking about, on groomers or on powder? I think personally steep groomers are more difficult then pow since you have to commit far more to sticking your edge and transitioning then you do in powder,(you also gain more speed).

Initially steep terrain scares you into side-slipping and avoiding your transition because since the pitch is so high; you gain speed far faster then you are used to. This means that you have to be in control as soon as you drop in since too much speed on certain terrain = out of control = crash.
First of all, make sure your edges are maintained and SHARP. Magnetraction may help with icy patches.

With that said, I actually find the reverse. That is, groomers (or rather, packed because at a certain steepness, it's not groomable I don't think) are easier than powder...at least the powder than has been ridden on before. I don't have much experience with fresh powder.

The reason why is that powder (if ridden on at least) is more variable and bumpy with unpredictable pack density (is that a term?). Thus I have found that my board goes all over the place more and I have to constantly adjust for chaotic terrain and tire out my legs. I don't know when I'm actually going to accelerate or decellerate and sometimes even inadvertantly come to a stop....which throws off my rythm.

With more packed terrain, there's less of this problem because what you see is what you get usually. And although you gain speed downhill a lot faster, it is more controllable. I have no problem with picking up some speed, as long as I know I can slow down at the right moment. However, sometimes you have to realize you cannot stop in a certain area.

One of the key mental aspects for me => Get over the fact that you will have to lean forward... A LOT.
This facing downhill can be nervewracking in steep terrain but if you do it, it will align your neutral body position to the slope (as if you were on a leveled slope) and allow you to manuever your board MUCH easier. You will also gain speed much easier, but as I've mentioned, at least you will be in control. If you get scared and put your weight on the rear by standing "upright to gravity", it's real difficult to turn and you might crash because you can't control your direction and stop as quickly.
12-19-2010 12:54 PM
rasmasyean Well, for all we know, this guy could be 16 years old and president of the hip-hop club, but you can see him booggie some pretty extreme terrain with some intense moves.

12-19-2010 11:24 AM
jlm1976
Where's your spray at?

When you are riding where do you spray snow? Does it change from Blues to Blacks to Double Blacks?
A game to play to learn early edge pressure and the turns SnowWolf is talking about is to try to spray snow to the sides of the trail on a steepish Blue trail while make some short skidded turns that SnowWolf described. Try to make it so you are spraying as little snow as possible down the hill. Play with spraying alot of snow to the sides and just a little. What happens when you spray alot? A little? After you have that down, try to spray snow up the hill(very hard to do but fun to try, don't feel bad if you can't get this). After that, play with spraying in all three directions(up, to the side, and down) on a different turn. Then slowly take it to steeper and steeper terrain.

The idea behind this and early edge pressure is to start braking before you actually pick up speed. That way you aren't agressively braking at the bottom of the turn fighting to scrub speed you built up through your turn because you never gained the speed. The reason behind practicing all 3 directions is so you can apply edge pressure when and where you want it in a turn.
If you watch Pro's like Jeremy Jones riding steeps, their spray is always biggest and starts by spraying to the side of the slope rather than down it.
Good luck. Oh the above exercise is even more fun with a buddy, then you can ride side by side and try spray each other as you ride down.
12-18-2010 12:22 AM
SiKBOY The steeper it is, the more aggressive you have to be with your riding. When initiating your turn, project yourself over the nose of the board to get your weight over your front foot. Initiating your new edge earlier in the turn will help you with speed control. The earlier you initiate your new edge before the fall-line the better off you will be. Good pressure control is going to help you slow down between the turns so make sure that you unweight the board before you start your turn and then really sink down on the new edge at the end of your turn.
12-17-2010 10:46 PM
deelissh yeah, i think i start to lean back too much and so i kinda skid on my ass for a second and then am back up and turn... but then skid a little again

guess i just need more practice?
12-17-2010 09:03 PM
HoboMaster What are you talking about, on groomers or on powder? I think personally steep groomers are more difficult then pow since you have to commit far more to sticking your edge and transitioning then you do in powder,(you also gain more speed).

Initially steep terrain scares you into side-slipping and avoiding your transition because since the pitch is so high; you gain speed far faster then you are used to. This means that you have to be in control as soon as you drop in since too much speed on certain terrain = out of control = crash.

In order to be in control you need to get a decent amount of turns in depending on the steepness in order to keep yourself at a controllable speed. Not committing to your turns is not an option, because the less turns you make the more out-of-control your going to get. I suggest finding a steep groomer, and practicing slowly your transition from front to back, making a full/close to full stop between each turn in order to keep your speed down and familiarize yourself with how it feels.

The more you do this, the less sketchy making turns on steep terrain is going to feel and pretty soon you will be able to connect fluid turns without having to speed check yourself. Like any other terrain, it's mostly just a process of getting used to the feeling associated with your body moving at a faster speed then you are used too and keeping in control.

Also, be aware of the conditions! Have the groomers been chopped/moguled up? Has the pow been compacted into crud? Taking these conditions into effect with your riding is important because fucked up snow greatly increases your chances of eating shit when going fast, especially on steep terrain. You can be doing everything right and hit an ice patch/mogul hump and it will completely throw you for a loop.
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