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Thread: What characteristics make bindings GOOD bindings? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
12-22-2010 01:12 PM
JoeR
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyrpn View Post
Oh, you're talking about one specific model. Highback heights are pretty standard across most manufacturers and models these days. You won't find an entire category of "lowbacks" from which to choose. The Burton Lo-Back is (was?) a deliberate recycling of an old-fashioned design; I wouldn't buy it for any type of riding unless you already know exactly how it will behave for you, or you don't mind pure experimentation and possibly wasting your money.
12-22-2010 12:33 PM
monkeyrpn The lowbacks I saw were these Burton Lo-Back Snowboard Bindings 2009 | evo outlet

Thanks for your explanation.
12-22-2010 11:12 AM
JoeR
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyrpn View Post
Thanks everyone! All the qualities you have listed are things I would want in a pair of bindings too~

JoeR. Thanks so much for answering my big question! Would I be correct to say the the low backs would be better suited for more flexible riding like park riding? Thanks!
I'm not sure what you mean by "low backs." If you mean rear-entry bindings with a highback that folds down, then yes, as I said, they're good for any use in which you need to get in and out of your back binding frequently, as in park riding. However, rear-entry does not necessarily mean flexible. For example, Flows come in a range of stiffnesses. Some are supposed to be good for park riding, but the stiffer ones are meant for all-mountain use, or freeriding. Don't make an assumption about flexibility/stiffness based on the type of binding. You will usually find a range of flexes among a line of bindings with the same strap/access style.
12-22-2010 10:50 AM
monkeyrpn Thanks everyone! All the qualities you have listed are things I would want in a pair of bindings too~

JoeR. Thanks so much for answering my big question! Would I be correct to say the the low backs would be better suited for more flexible riding like park riding? Thanks!
12-21-2010 04:21 PM
JoeR
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyrpn View Post
What characteristics they have make them better for certain type of riding.
No one seems to have addressed this question yet, so:

Most people (doesn't have to mean you, of course) prefer more flexible bindings for park riding, stiffer bindings for freeriding, and something in the middle for all-mountain riding. The parts of the binding to which the flexible/stiff rating applies the most are the highback and the ankle strap, although the entire chassis can be more or less rigid, I suppose.

Another performance factor is ease of entry, especially if you are riding park or freeriding at a small resort with short runs. Rear-entry bindings (e.g., Flows, some K2's) or single-ratchet bindings (e.g., Ride Contrabands) can reduce the time you spend fussing with bindings after you get off the lift.
12-21-2010 03:57 PM
jliu 1. Ratchets that dont stick and stay in place after some hard riding
2. Straps that conform to boot without pinch points
3. Durability (more so in terms of the ratchets, high back, strap padding etc. Most baseplates are decently durable only break due to mfg defect..hence the lifetime warranties...having said that...always exceptions to the rule. The other crap can break due to poor design and weak materials)
12-21-2010 03:15 PM
ev13wt
Quote:
Originally Posted by monkeyrpn View Post
What are canted food beds?
Means they are not flat, but canted towards the rider at 2 or 3 degrees, giving you a more natural stance.


1. Useablility, ease of ratches.
2. Doesn't fall apart

For me, Burton has never let me down. Rome Targa is my new one, kind of rough those ratchet edges, the ratched thing never goes into the holder properly and then jams (Little leather thingy) and the left toe strap keeps falling off. :/

But enough of the hate. The cants and the support is grade a and the board really does flex under the bindings and its a great feeling to ride them.

Ziploc ties go a long way to secure that front toestrap. :P
12-21-2010 03:01 PM
Extremo Comfort, responsiveness, durability, ease of access. In that order.
12-21-2010 02:12 PM
Nivek Comfort and the response to match up with the board and riding I'm doing.
12-21-2010 01:02 AM
monkeyrpn What are canted food beds?
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