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  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-16-2011 09:36 PM
ThunderChunky I go flat based from strapping my front foot in till I hit the lift line. But I do not advise this, I have fallen really hard a lot of times. I even got knocked out once. You can try it, but ride within your limits and don't endanger anyone else.

That being said, I can only go flat based for about 20 seconds or so because we have 500 vert and the longest trail is like two or three football fields. I don't know if I'll be doing this on my rocker though, I feel a lot more confident on my Cheaptrick.

*Back foot, I'm stupid.
11-16-2011 09:17 PM
IdahoFreshies
Quote:
Originally Posted by EC99SS View Post
I have a question for those of you who ride flat based. Do you only ride flat based for very short distances before taking it back on edge? Or do you go for a long distance that way? I always thought riding flat based for long distances was not advised due to increased chances of catching an edge.

Thanks
there is a pretty long blue at the local hill. i started riding it, and decided it was too boring so i decided i was just going to bomb it and see how it came out. I pretty much rode that thing flat base the entire time, and you can be dam sure i came close to catching a few edges. i felt it start to catch a few times, but i was crouched pretty low and managed to tweak it and avoid slamming. i got going pretty dam fast haha

but most of the stuff i actually ride its almost impossible to just flat base it the entire time. either it is too steep or there are too many trees in the way.
11-16-2011 06:40 PM
jdang307
Quote:
Originally Posted by CheeseForSteeze View Post
Have Ray Lewis chase you with a bloody machete on a snowmobile. This is guaranteed to increase your speed.
Or Rosie O'donnel/Nancy Pelosi in lingerie.
11-15-2011 03:24 PM
Tarzanman Its already been said, but I would like to re-emphasize the fact that some boards are just SLOW.

I was on a trip to Vail with some friends-of-friends. Vail is huge and has a ton of terrain that is not-quite-a-catwalk and not-quite-a-slope. Anways, this guy would routinely lose speed a couple of yards before the rest of us. He and his brother were similarly sized and similarly skilled, so I am not inclined to think it was a technique issue.

I tuned the guy's board for him that evening at the house with the same wax on my board, but it did not make a noticeable difference. He even went so far to have it waxed and tuned again (this time by a shop). I can't say for sure if the 2nd tuning did him any good because I didn't spend that much time riding with him after.

Anyways... try switching boards with one of the other guys to see if that makes much of a difference.
11-15-2011 11:49 AM
BigmountainVMD If you only weigh in at 120 lbs, the faster you try to go, the more that wind resistance will factor into reducing your speed. Make sure your shoulders are cutting into the wind, instead of opening up your body to the wind to create more resistance. At 6'3" and 175 I have a similar problem, and I attempted to solve it by buying a slimmer jacket and trying to cut into the wind more.
11-15-2011 10:38 AM
wrathfuldeity
Quote:
Originally Posted by EC99SS View Post
I have a question for those of you who ride flat based. Do you only ride flat based for very short distances before taking it back on edge? Or do you go for a long distance that way? I always thought riding flat based for long distances was not advised due to increased chances of catching an edge.

Thanks
To go for fairly long distances flat based (or almost so)...on flats, cattracks or low angled stuff. The trick is to gently weight the nose and keep feet, ankles and knees loose to absorb the bits of roughage...alot like riding 1 footy. If you have weight on the nose, there are no edges to catch because the edges are parallel with the direction of travel. Sometimes it will feel like you are going to catch an edge because of the roughage but keep loose and weighted on the nose and its just a tad squirrely/twitchy...you learn that's normal...you just don't want to stiffen up when it happens. Some say you never ride completely flat based and that is true...but you can get really close to flat.

On steeper stuff, I'll go flat to accelerate for short distance...especially when just getting going or a place where you want a burst of speed so that you can mach in to a carve....like hitting the afterburners.
11-15-2011 08:11 AM
EC99SS I have a question for those of you who ride flat based. Do you only ride flat based for very short distances before taking it back on edge? Or do you go for a long distance that way? I always thought riding flat based for long distances was not advised due to increased chances of catching an edge.

Thanks
11-07-2011 07:16 PM
AAA Decent thoughts so far. It could be your weight (less), your board length (shorter), sidecut geometry (circular radius or overall tighter), base material(extruded), wax (wrong temperature or inadequate job), and/or technique (skidding, more completed turns across the fall line, or possibly using a higher edge angle/tighter turning). The latter variable could potentially be from either poorer or better technique, or just being more or less aggressive. See which variables you can adjust and go from there. Beyond that, just enjoy riding.
11-07-2011 05:14 PM
CheeseForSteeze Have Ray Lewis chase you with a bloody machete on a snowmobile. This is guaranteed to increase your speed.
11-07-2011 08:49 AM
kpd2003 Agreed with most everything said.

But being a heavier rider also sucks - I'm tall, heavy, and have giant feet - each factor can really restrict my choices on which products i can buy and I usaully pay a heftier (sp?) price for everything I buy.

I would gladly trade all of that if it meant no more "bombing" the hill and avoiding another concussion
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