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Thread: Another Critique the Crap out of my riding :D Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-14-2012 12:11 PM
wrathfuldeity
Quote:
Originally Posted by quixotic_elixer View Post

Mentioned earlier, I tend to hunch over and round my shoulders in... If I were to stick my chest out and open up my shoulders, will this correct my posture in correlation with my stance?
Riding hunched over...yo butt tends to stick out...stinky butt. To help correct this: tilt your pelvis forward...like abit of humpin...but also tighten your abs; while also tightening yo butt cheeks and sink in your knees and pull back your shoulders.
02-14-2012 12:00 PM
quixotic_elixer
Quote:
Originally Posted by designfemme View Post
Not to throw even more on your plate ( ), but I found that doing the "hump" (i.e., thrusting of the hips forward) on toeside was tremendously helpful. (As a forum lurker, you might've seen the "hump/dump" phrase before.)

It's easy to do, and it's startlingly efficient. As you juggle all these things to remember, the "hump" part, I found, was the easiest to do and not mess up. And you'll feel an immediate difference, too, in your performance.

As a beginner myself, I have mad respect for the progress you made. I couldn't do what you did in the videos after just 5-6 days of riding.
No worries, the more critiques I get the more I crave to go up and improve on them all! I will definitely try emphasizes on the hump/dump. Two things I should be a natural at

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
Okay, just had time to sit and watch your videos several times to see what is going on.

First, before getting started, to clear up a very common misconception, carving is a fairly advanced type of turn that uses only the sidecut of the board to turn and has virtually no skidding at all. It will be a while before you are actually carving a turn so don`t even worry about that right now. What you want is to get more fluid in your skidded turns and then make them more dynamic.

From a board up analysis, the first thing that is obvious is that you are primarily pivoting your board to turn it. Generally, you are traveling down the hill in a fairly straight line and pivoting the back and forth to control speed rather than riding out full completed turns.

Next, moving up your ankles, knees and hips are quite static. You have a fairly decent stance with some decent knee bend, but it really does not vary throughout your turns. In addition, you are favoring your back foot as evidenced by the fact that there is consistently a lot more knee bend in the back leg than the front. In order to pivot the board, you momentarily shift to the front foot and slide the back foot laterally to slide the tail of the board around. Moving up from there your hips and shoulders actually look pretty good and are pretty well aligned with your board. Your are not riding with a countered stance to face forward so keep this up. The only thing I would say is to straighten up a bit. You tend to ride bent at the waist a bit and this is a big part of your heelside problems. As for the arms, try to keep them a little lower down by your sides. As for the head, it is also very static. Turn your head a little more in the direction of each turn to help set up your upper body for turn initiation.

Some things for you to work on that should make some noticeable differences in board performance:

Front Foot Steering! For these skidded turns, lets use the front foot more to initiate each turn by twisting the board at the nose more. Press the toes down to pressure the toesdie edge for initiating your toeside turn and mash the heel down to pressure the heelside edge for your heelside turns.

Shifting your weight forward to make the front foot heavier is going to make a HUGE impact on the how responsive your board is. Also consider this; the heavy end of the board always goes down the hill first. Keeping the board nose heavy is going to make for much cleaner turns.

Flex and extend!. As I said, you have a pretty decent stance and it is really an ideal neutral to always return to but you need some movement throughout your turns. For right now, I want you to flex down to your lowest point as you initiate each turn than gradually rise up through the turn through completion then drop back down to make the next one. You should be rising and falling throughout every turn.

For your heelside turn, sit down more into as opposed to trying to lean back. This will give you a lot better balance and the ability to pressure the hell edge. Increasing forward lean on your highbacks can help a lot too. For the toeside turn, avoid the intuitive temptation to bend over at the waist. This does really bad things to your balance. Instead, drive your shins forward into the tongues of your boots and push your pelvis forward while slightly arching your back to stay centered over the top of your board.

Throw in a little rotary movement for your turns!. When going into your heelside turn, pull the front knee forward toward the nose of the board. This action creates a little bit of rotational movement to the foot that favors the heelside. When going toeside, roll that front knee slightly back toward the tail. In addition, pull the back knee toward the tail. These movements will add a lot of rotational force to your feet that favors the toeside.

Along with this idea of rotary movements. be sure to turn the head more, especially foe heelside. Look over that front shoulder more and it is totally okay to allow a little bit of hip and shoulder rotation to set the front shoulder over the edge you are turning to.

Turn Slower!. Right now you are very quickly pivoting the board around. Using the techniques offered above, be a little patient and allow the board to twist, then tilt onto its edge more and ride the turn through the turn more, making larger radius turns that are more completed and resembling linked C shapes.

Play around with these techniques a bit and shoot another video...
I completely agree with your assessment. I'm going to start working on fixing upper body movements first, and work my way down to the harder stuff that requires more 'feel'.

Mentioned earlier, I tend to hunch over and round my shoulders in... If I were to stick my chest out and open up my shoulders, will this correct my posture in correlation with my stance?

After lurking for a been, and reading a lot of your analysis of your riding it's quite clear a lot of people seem to fall int he same category as me in terms of back foot riding instead of front foot. I also realized this and tried to correct it. Chalk it up to fear of crashing hard, but I'm finding it nerve wrecking when putting my weight forward and the board takes off as it picks up speed really quickly. It's something that i'll progressively (which I am) getting used to. The logic and reasoning's make total sense, but the body just reacts out of fear! haha

My highbacks are leaning forward as much as they will go. I'm using 390boss with burton rulers. Is there anything else I can do?
02-14-2012 10:31 AM
wrathfuldeity Just to add, when focusing on an isolated aspect or technique...really exaggrate the movement. As for the hands...cut them off at the shoulders...you don't need them....stick them in your pockets, grab da nutz, be like Prince Charles and hold them behind you. Don't be like Queenie and wave them around.
02-13-2012 12:57 PM
designfemme Not to throw even more on your plate ( ), but I found that doing the "hump" (i.e., thrusting of the hips forward) on toeside was tremendously helpful. (As a forum lurker, you might've seen the "hump/dump" phrase before.)

It's easy to do, and it's startlingly efficient. As you juggle all these things to remember, the "hump" part, I found, was the easiest to do and not mess up. And you'll feel an immediate difference, too, in your performance.

As a beginner myself, I have mad respect for the progress you made. I couldn't do what you did in the videos after just 5-6 days of riding.
02-13-2012 11:56 AM
quixotic_elixer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Efilnikufesin View Post
Couple of quick things I noticed. One, keep you upper body more upright, bend more with your knees and less with your waist. Two, keep yourself centered on the board. If you look in the video you can see that you have less bend in your leading leg than your trailing leg, hence you are leaning uphill while riding. Keep yourself centered with both knees bent equally, it may feel like you are leaning downhill, but you will initiate turns easier and have more control when you hit choppy terrain.

I at times notice myself still leaning on my back leg on steeper terrain and have to correct myself. If I am washing out alot on high speed turns it is usually because I am leaning uphill. By leaning uphill you are taking weight off your downhill contact point, making especially heelside turns harder to control.

There are members on here that would know better than I though. I'm better at correcting myself than correcting others.
1. I tend to naturally hunch over, this will be a tough challenge!
2. Completely agree with the fact that I am still leaning uphill. I actually realized this the day before and explained why I was falling a lot when on heelside.

Today was my attempt at trying to lean forward mroe and remain centered. Was only able to accomplish a handful of times, and it was a clear difference in feeling when I did it correctly as my heel edge would dig in and pull me through the turns and was a fantastic feeling!

Quote:
Originally Posted by firstx1017 View Post
I totally know what you mean about watching your own videos. I've been posting videos for snowolf to help me on and in the videos I feel like I am doing one thing, but when I watch the video you can hardly tell what I think I am doing. I feel like I am bending my knees at a 90 degree angle but in the video I have straight legs. It's hard to remember "EVERYTHING" when you are on the hill! lol
It's definitely tough when you have so many little things that factor into your form, as well as thinking your doing it correctly when in fact you aren't!

Thank goodness for videos and this form

Quote:
Originally Posted by Death View Post
Yep, that's about what I noticed, you aren't bending and getting aggressive in your carvings and your having your hands up like you do just looks like you're bracing yourself for a fall. But hey, with only 5 days under your belt that's awesome, I have more tips for the cameraman than your riding. You just need to get out and ride some more. Good job
I'm not sure what i'm suppose to do with my hands? lol should I have them spread out pointing head to tail? or should I keep them tucked towards my body? I've been leaning in with my shoulder when trying to initiate turns.

Quote:
Originally Posted by designfemme View Post
Me too!!! I decided to change my mental approach and did this: instead focusing on getting all the goals down in one run, I just try to nail down one or two areas I want to improve consistently — whatever feels right or necessary at the moment I'm going down the hill. Whenever I tried to "do this, do that, do this, don't forget that," I end up over-thinking and not really paying attention to the response of my body/board. Too many things to think about.

I realized that by tackling smaller pieces of my goals, I was establishing "muscle memory" much better. If I try to do twenty things off my mental checklist, nothing is consistently done and nothing ends up as muscle memory.

I don't know if it will work for everyone, but it certainly worked for me!
That is the exact same approach I am taking Working from top to bottom!

So I guess my action plan for the next day is:
1: straighten my back
2: What do I do with my hands?
3. Bend knees more and try to lean forward
4. GO FAST!
02-13-2012 09:42 AM
boardaddicktd u look a lil stiff but if its only your 5th day of riding i'd say ur lookin pretty good. u gotta love the "crowdedness" of happy valley. that run is always crowded as hell. i usually run along the banks at the left side to stay away from everyone haha.
02-13-2012 09:03 AM
designfemme
Quote:
Originally Posted by firstx1017 View Post
It's hard to remember "EVERYTHING" when you are on the hill! lol

Me too!!! I decided to change my mental approach and did this: instead focusing on getting all the goals down in one run, I just try to nail down one or two areas I want to improve consistently — whatever feels right or necessary at the moment I'm going down the hill. Whenever I tried to "do this, do that, do this, don't forget that," I end up over-thinking and not really paying attention to the response of my body/board. Too many things to think about.

I realized that by tackling smaller pieces of my goals, I was establishing "muscle memory" much better. If I try to do twenty things off my mental checklist, nothing is consistently done and nothing ends up as muscle memory.

I don't know if it will work for everyone, but it certainly worked for me!
02-13-2012 08:55 AM
Death
Quote:
Originally Posted by quixotic_elixer View Post
From the video I also seem to be quite static
Yep, that's about what I noticed, you aren't bending and getting aggressive in your carvings and your having your hands up like you do just looks like you're bracing yourself for a fall. But hey, with only 5 days under your belt that's awesome, I have more tips for the cameraman than your riding. You just need to get out and ride some more. Good job
02-13-2012 01:33 AM
Sick-Pow start hitting small jumps. the terrain does not lend it self to naturally taking that progression like it does out west. Don't think like a skier with form, think about playing, watch skateboard videos.
02-13-2012 01:03 AM
firstx1017 I totally know what you mean about watching your own videos. I've been posting videos for snowolf to help me on and in the videos I feel like I am doing one thing, but when I watch the video you can hardly tell what I think I am doing. I feel like I am bending my knees at a 90 degree angle but in the video I have straight legs. It's hard to remember "EVERYTHING" when you are on the hill! lol
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