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  Topic Review (Newest First)
09-23-2012 02:25 AM
snowklinger
Quote:
Originally Posted by john doe View Post
Put a sticker on your board that says "Warning: This board has been coated in human semen." Maybe it has. Maybe it hasn't. But what thief would take the risk that it is true?
I don't have to, I ride Never Summers, everyone splooges on my boards.

Plus they are already wearing gloves.

You love human semen.
09-22-2012 09:08 PM
john doe Put a sticker on your board that says "Warning: This board has been coated in human semen." Maybe it has. Maybe it hasn't. But what thief would take the risk that it is true?
09-22-2012 02:27 PM
Nito
Quote:
Originally Posted by legallyillegal View Post
theyre called skikeys, and theyre disabled by a common screwdriver
I believe that a screw driver could break the lock but you would also need a hammer to tap (3 taps?) the screw driver in. So if I'm in the lodge and see someone swinging a hammer near my board, I'll bust a chair over their head.

Where as the Ball and Chain can be cut with Bolt cutters. Bolt cutters although cumbersome, can be hidden under a jacket. So theft would be much more discrete.

Those retractable coil locks are trash and can be cut with tin shears. But they are a mild deterrent.

In the end, most thieves will avoid locks and just take the unlocked board. The exception being, the thief wants your board, considers your lock not a problem and the board is worth the risk of getting caught.

PS - So I guess the best answer is to find the old style locking snowboard racks and pay the $1 in quarters to lock your board up.
09-22-2012 10:39 AM
Bones
Quote:
Originally Posted by legallyillegal View Post
theyre called skikeys, and theyre disabled by a common screwdriver
How?

My local hill always seems to have some maintenance guy out there wailing away on the rack to get them off when someone loses their key.

I like the ski key. My bitch is finding an empty slot on the racks
09-22-2012 10:24 AM
pwol I just use one of those burton retractable locks. Its not as strong as some bike lock but I think that just having any kind of lock on it will make a thief not bother and move onto something else.
09-22-2012 10:09 AM
legallyillegal theyre called skikeys, and theyre disabled by a common screwdriver
09-22-2012 09:28 AM
Nito
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheepstealer View Post
A U-lock? Seriously? I don't mean to be cynical Nivek, but isn't that a bit overkill? I'm actually honestly interested if any one on here uses one of these. I have one for my bike and it weighs close to 10 lbs.

I've always used a simple retractable lock (fits right in my pocket). They're light and easy to pop on and off. Yes, the cable is a little flimsy but its kept away most of the Boston/NY doucheheads that migrate to the mountains I ride...

Just my $0.02.
Nivek isn't to far off the mark. There are new snowboard racks that have deep rails with a hole at the end for a lock. You buy a small lock from the on mountain Pro store to lock the board onto the rack.

If you are going to a resort that does not have the new secure racks, Kryptonite has a coil lock called "Ball and Chain."

BTW, forget the retractable locks. The cable is so thin, you can easily cut it with a pair of tin shears.
09-22-2012 08:47 AM
onthefence I was looking around for a lock myself and found that most people dislike the retractable pocket sized locks because they just stop working eventually, either the retractor gives out or the lock jams and will not open. Also the plastic casing is just cheap and can be forced open if one was willing enough.

I just got this in the mail last week:

OnGuard Combo Lock Terrier Combo | SnowShack.com

Its convenient because its designed to be used with your gloves on. Also it does not have any fragile parts, its all just a simple bar/chamber interlock system so I don't imagine it will ever stop working or break due to the cold. Its not as portable as the retractable locks, but it still can be fit in an empty jacket pocket; I just recommend leaving it locked on a post if you only intend to dock at one location during your day.
09-21-2012 09:25 AM
ETM My lock is a swallowtail and positive camber rofl!!!
09-21-2012 09:20 AM
sheepstealer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nivek View Post
ProductInformation

That will keep you safe. Or a u-lock that is big enough to fit around the waist but not the tips. So that it isn't rideable.
A U-lock? Seriously? I don't mean to be cynical Nivek, but isn't that a bit overkill? I'm actually honestly interested if any one on here uses one of these. I have one for my bike and it weighs close to 10 lbs.

I've always used a simple retractable lock (fits right in my pocket). They're light and easy to pop on and off. Yes, the cable is a little flimsy but its kept away most of the Boston/NY doucheheads that migrate to the mountains I ride...

Just my $0.02.
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