Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: So how hard is it to work in Canada as a US citizen? Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 
   

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-03-2012 09:34 PM
BigmountainVMD
Quote:
Originally Posted by bkozzz View Post
Like SLC? or care to name a few?
Yeah, well if you want to live a short bus ride from the mountains, SLC or the mountains in CO are a great start. Even somewhere between Portland, OR and Mt. Hood or Bend, OR and Mt. Bachelor. Decent sized towns so there is more opportunity to live close but not ON the mountains. This means cheaper rent and more realistic job opportunities. There are also way more mountains (CO and SLC), and everything is more spread out, more people, more job opportunities, etc... As opposed to Whistler which is essentially just a huge mountain village from my experience there.

Plus with your lack of Canadian-ness, it would just be easier to stay in the US. I also agree with the above poster about the snow. It's good, don't get me wrong, but if you want champagne powder, you can't beat Utah. I guess if you wanted the away from everything experience you could try Alaska.

I have friends in Avon and Eagle-Vail, CO that pay a third what I pay for rent here in Philly, all of them have had multiple jobs on and off the mountain (Beaver Creek mostly), and all get to ride most days. Whenever I go visit, I hop on a bus outside their apt for 5 minutes and am at the mtn.

Depending on you, the possibilities are different. You could get a job at a lodge up at Snowbird or Alta in Utah, at a snowboard shop near Vail or Breckenridge, at a restaurant in Bellingham, WA and ride at Mt. Baker or at a friggin grocery store in Bend, OR... there are a million ways to be a ski bum, just don't put all your eggs in one basket. Aim for a quality part time job where living expenses aren't high and you will get your 100 day season in.
11-03-2012 06:12 PM
bkozzz
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigmountainVMD View Post
Whistler is fun to visit, but way too pricey. I wouldn't ever want to move there any try to get a job unless I had a hookup. Better places to go if you want to ride all day and work part time.
Like SLC? or care to name a few?
11-03-2012 05:57 PM
BigmountainVMD Whistler is fun to visit, but way too pricey. I wouldn't ever want to move there any try to get a job unless I had a hookup. Better places to go if you want to ride all day and work part time.
11-03-2012 05:24 PM
Bones Don't get all worked up.

My point is that, as a visitor, it is pretty easy to get into Canada. There's a long list of countries that don't require a visa to enter, just a valid passport. You can be denied entry for a variety of reasons including a record, but you don't require a visa. That said, visitors are subject to Canadian law but not entitled to Canadian privileges.

Long term residency (1 year +1 day?) and working are another story.

We used to have a problem with foreigners applying for work permits using relative's companies and then immediately hitting up the healthcare system. So many provinces have added a waiting period and the Feds really increased the difficulty level for employers.

Point being, that most employers won't even attempt to jump through those hoops unless you've got a rare skill set that they need. Lifties, dishwashers, etc. aren't going to get it.
11-03-2012 04:53 PM
OldDog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
I realize that it all sounds very restrictive (and it is), you have to remember that once you're on Canadian soil, you can get most of the rights and privileges that a Canadian gets including health care while your "legal/illegal" status is figured out through the courts.

We've got a ton of "non-status" people in the country who we can't deport because their cases/appeals haven't finished, but to whom we have to provide the basic of Canadian rights (food, housing, healthcare, legal aid, etc.)

Visitor permits are easy to get, permits to live and work here....not so much.
A. The OP asked about "working" in Canada.

B. There is no such thing as "visitor permit", it's called a passport. Anyone from the states can "vacation" in Canada unless of course you have a felony record. It which case they will not let you in the country. Keep in mind, a DUI is a felony in Canada and that counts too. If you have only 1 conviction and it was more than 10 years ago, and you can "prove" that with a copy of your criminal record you can still get in. However, it is up to the border agent's discretion.

C. In BC anyway, there is a 30 day waiting period for the provincial healthcare plan and it is not free unless you are indigent (or have sufficiently low income).

D. US Citizens are not granted "landed immigrant" status like those from other countries.

Sorry, but you sir are just plain mistaken (on several fronts).

If you don't need to work, don't have a criminal record, and have a current passport you can visit the Great White North whenever you choose. However, why Whistler is beyond me. I have friends who were volunteer ski safety "yellow jackets" at Whistler for years and the concrete they call powder there sucks, it's overpriced, and mobbed by like 20,000 tourists at most times (many of whom can't ski or board for shit). Per my friends who were locals and there 3 days/week for several years.

There are cheaper and better mountains to be found in BC. From what I hear, Revelstoke is the shit and Kicking Horse is good too.

Anyway, hope that helps.

PS: Stay away from Shames, I here it sucks there.
11-03-2012 03:05 PM
Bones I realize that it all sounds very restrictive (and it is), you have to remember that once you're on Canadian soil, you can get most of the rights and privileges that a Canadian gets including health care while your "legal/illegal" status is figured out through the courts.

We've got a ton of "non-status" people in the country who we can't deport because their cases/appeals haven't finished, but to whom we have to provide the basic of Canadian rights (food, housing, healthcare, legal aid, etc.)

Visitor permits are easy to get, permits to live and work here....not so much.
11-03-2012 02:39 PM
OldDog
So you wanna work in Canada for the winter eh?...

Quote:
Originally Posted by bkozzz View Post
I'm going to go someplace this winter to ski bum it, and obviously Whistler would be an ideal place to be. However, I have heard it is extremely hard for a U.S citizen to get a work visa there. If anybody has done this or knows what the process for being able to be eligible to work over the border is please help me out.
1. You need to prove that you already have a job to apply or that you have "sufficient" means to support yourself while looking for a job. I think it was a bank balance of $10,500 minimum.

2. You need to be a "skilled worker". This means college degree and skills and/or training and experience that are not available in Canada.

3. It will take at least 6 months if you already have a job lined up. More if you don't. That is with an immigration lawyer preparing all of the documentation and taking care of the details.

4. Part of this process will be the preparation and submission of a Labor Market Opinion proving that your skills are not available within Canada (or atleast the local area). I have a copy of the one that was prepared for me and it was like 25 pages detailing my credentials and the 3 months they searched for someone in Canada before hiring me.

I know all of this because I am currently working in Canada as a "skilled worker" on a 2 year work permit.

In other words, you sir are fucked... It ain't gonna happen. Now if you can line something up "under the table" before you come up, great. But I wouldn't count on finding it once you get here. Most employers won't touch you without a SIN (Social Insurance Number).

Maybe we should sticky this or something so I don't have to keep telling people about how their dreams are doomed to failure?
11-03-2012 01:51 PM
snowklinger Or work illegally

They'll only deport you to here
11-03-2012 01:39 PM
Bones It's about as easy as it is for a non-American to get a work permit in the US.
If you don't have a specific job to go to and a sponsoring employer, it's probably a no go.

Contact a Canadian Embassy or Consular office.
11-03-2012 10:30 AM
Lamps There was a thread on this recently, it's not easy. You should consider how much different it would be boarding at vail for example, where you can easily work legally.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome