Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: Snowboard Technology Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 
   

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-08-2012 01:09 PM
timmytard Well..
I just sold a guy a brand new never ridden 2002 Palmer Titanium Channel board that has been sitting in a closet for exactly ten years. I too just got one.

The guy I sold it to already has one & has been looking for another one for years. I'm just waiting on payment then I'll be shipping it out.

I guess I'll have to tell him I need a comparison of the two boards.
One has been ridden for ten years & the other has never been ridden.

I guarantee this guy will put it to the test, buddy is a hard booter.
I've been riding for 25 years & have never tried the hard boot thing yet.
& as gay as most people here might think that is, if you've ever seen someone doing it, they put a lot more stress on a board.

I have a feeling they will be exactly the same.

The new one I have(actually I have 2 brand new ones) are stiff as fuck, I don't think I've ever flexed a board this stiff, both seem to flex the same.
To the eye, they both have the same amount of camber.

I have an old K2 that is pre 4 hole pattern, so sporadic holes.
It has tonnes of camber.

TT
11-08-2012 09:04 AM
poutanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
Can't say how much effect all this will have, but pretty sure it'll have some effect.
Yeah I wasn't talking about a board degrading over time while riding, I was talking about one degrading by just sitting in a closet for a long period of time.

If you buy two identical boards today, board A is used for this season, and board B is put in a closet for 10 years and then brought out, I highly doubt any of us would be able to tell the difference (if we could magically fast forward to ten years from now)...
11-08-2012 08:21 AM
wrathfuldeity
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
1) All materials undergo fatigue from stresses. Each and every flex wears on them.

2) Unless you're a delicate rider, you'll apply shocks to your board over and above simple fatigue occasionally. Those add up too.

3) If boards were totally and completely waterproof and watertight, it wouldn't matter. But over time seams will loosen, microfractures will form, and moisture will get into the core. I've had to replace ceiling rafters that got wet, so I know what moisture does to wood.

4) Volatiles gradually evaporate, which will result in man-made materials gradually becoming brittle.

5) Two words: Ultra-Violet light.

Can't say how much effect all this will have, but pretty sure it'll have some effect.
They don't evaporate, I'd bet in 500 years you could still tell it was a snowboard. I believe most manufacturers suggest to store board in a cool dry and out of the sunlight.
11-08-2012 08:01 AM
Donutz
Quote:
Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
I'd be willing to bet that if I bought two identical boards today, and rode one this season, and put the second away in a closet for 10 years and brought it out for a season, that I wouldn't notice the difference.
1) All materials undergo fatigue from stresses. Each and every flex wears on them.

2) Unless you're a delicate rider, you'll apply shocks to your board over and above simple fatigue occasionally. Those add up too.

3) If boards were totally and completely waterproof and watertight, it wouldn't matter. But over time seams will loosen, microfractures will form, and moisture will get into the core. I've had to replace ceiling rafters that got wet, so I know what moisture does to wood.

4) Volatiles gradually evaporate, which will result in man-made materials gradually becoming brittle.

5) Two words: Ultra-Violet light.

Can't say how much effect all this will have, but pretty sure it'll have some effect.
11-08-2012 02:01 AM
matty19 Hmmmm... Pretty much every aspect of board manufacture has changed in the past ten years. Resins are more durable, core materials and profiling are better engineered. Topsheets are thinner, lighter, and more durable. Edges are stronger, hold a longer-lasting edge, and are now often profiled for better edge hold in carved turns. Sidewalls are now engineered for dampening and improved edge hold. Basalt, Kevlar, carbon fiber, and bamboo inserts help to get more/better edge hold, power transfer, turn initiation, and pop. Camber profiles like RC, C2, Camrock, etc really do maintain hardpack carving ability while drastically improving float. Wax-infusion and molecular engineering of sintered base materials yields faster, more durable base materials. Progressive side cuts yield better turn initiation and cleaner carves.

Snowboards are now lighter, just as durable, better performing, and many are much more able to handle a variety of riding styles and snow conditions.
11-07-2012 03:49 PM
poutanen
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nivek View Post
Boards are made of natural materials. If you bought something from 2000 and literally never rode it today it would ride like poo. Board materials break down over time regardless of how often its been ridden. A 2005 that has been ridden at least 60 days is surely smooshy and dead.
I have a hard time believing this. The only natural material in a snowboard is the wood, and if wood broke down by just sitting there all our houses would fall over. The FG and resin aren't going to degrade noticably on a board that was bought and stored for ten years.

I'd be willing to bet that if I bought two identical boards today, and rode one this season, and put the second away in a closet for 10 years and brought it out for a season, that I wouldn't notice the difference.

Luckily I have no organic materials in my board so the fountain of youth it does not need...
11-07-2012 03:27 PM
phony_stark What kind of riding do you do? And how often do you go?
11-07-2012 02:52 PM
Lamps I really think a demo would be a good way to see if it's worth it.

Regarding boards degrading over time I'm not sure that boards that aren't ridden decay but they lose their pop with use; wood cores change their flex after repeated flexing for example.

Ultralight boards are less durable than regular boards and may not be suited for some features, but more generally construction techniques are better so boards of equal durability weigh less now than then.

Try before you buy and if you feel the difference you can decide if it's worth the expense to upgrade. 2012 stuff where available is usually pretty deeply discounted right now.
11-07-2012 02:40 PM
wrathfuldeity Some things have changed for the worse...manufacturing, materials are not as durable...maybe design things like c3...idk...haven't ridden but why not just ride a cambered. I understand the c3 but why not unweight/suck up the knees...and an argument about catching edges is not valid if ur at the the skill level of doing cross-unders. I have a three old 2004/5 made in CA top-end Options that has been ridden hard, had some hits and still have their shit together; one in particular still hands me my ass if I'm not paying attention and there are very few new boards that demand that level of my attention and aggressiveness.
11-07-2012 02:24 PM
Mcfloyd Ok, so I guess what I didn't realize is that the core materials degrade over time? I mean I know that from sharpening, catching rocks on the wax, and aesthetic scratches on the top material are what degrade. I just thought that the core material was NEVER supposed to degrade, since there it is never exposed to the elements directly.

You guys are saying that the core degrades naturally (poorly built boards pre-200ish era), which was evident from the board in my shed. But also that the core degrades from flexing it so often? And when you say it becomes softer, do you mean more flexible or that it loses the ability to bounce back to its original state (like a spring that has been pulled too often and becomes limp)?

And also to touch on the lighter aspects of boards these days:
My board has always been on the heavier side compared to my friends' with newer ones. Is there a sacrifice of durability and increased degradation with a lighter board? I feel like my board wouldn't have lasted nearly this long had it not been so solid.

Thanks for all the responses, these have been extremely helpful and I like seeing the pros and cons to getting a new board. I would have to agree that in the long run a snowboard can be very cheap (I payed somewhere around $200-$300 in 2006 for a brand new 2005 board), since it has lasted me this long. But still as a lump sum this can be damaging to anyone's budget (assuming said person is planning on also spending money for lift tix).
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome