Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums - Reply to Topic
Thread: If you can ride on the East Coast you can Ride anywhere... Reply to Thread
Title:
Message:
Trackback:
Send Trackbacks to (Separate multiple URLs with spaces) :
Post Icons
You may choose an icon for your message from the following list:
 
   

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in









Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



  Additional Options
Miscellaneous Options

  Topic Review (Newest First)
11-30-2012 09:43 AM
BruceWard
Ice Mandatory Wear

Quote:
Originally Posted by deeken View Post
I have to disagree with that notion that if you can ride on the east coast you can ride anywhere. I started out in VT and learned here for my first year. My skills weren't really progressing until I took a trip out to Tahoe and got a taste of that powder. I did a few days there and my skills drastically went up more in a week there than months on the east coast.

For me it was the confidence you get when falling in soft snow over falling on hard, packed east coast ice. After falling on that east coast ice so much I focused my attention on riding cautiously and avoiding falls. I'm in my mid 30's and I'm pretty big. When I fall it effen hurts. But once you hit the West coast powder and falling doesn't hurt as much, you take a lot more risks and push yourself.

I remember when I got back from my Tahoe trip I had so much confidence that I took a trip to Hunter with my buddies to show off my skills. I was doing great up until I took a nasty fall when I caught an edge and I quickly realized I wasn't in the West coast anymore.
All that F'ng said, i ride with mandatory body armour but maybe that'c cause I'm old as s*it and already broke my neck on ice.

I know this more from skiing but I was able to handle Squaw's KT22 on my first attempt mainly due to dealing with icy shit at Whiteface, the West was harder from a pow, terrain, get lost aspect but it is worth saying the east experience does PREPARE you to go but once you are out there a whole new skill set gets introduced that you would rarely experience on the Ice Coast.
11-30-2012 09:32 AM
BruceWard
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
Where there is a will there is a way. Take it easy and make steady progress and you will be a well rounded rider. Go out and ride in the nastiest shit mother nature comes up with and learn what you can and cannot do in any situation and always push your comfort zone and current skill level every day you ride. Scare yourself just a little every time but always within the safety margin.

While today I ride 50-55 degree big lines in the PNW and Alaska, there was a time not all that long ago where I thought I was going to shit myself riding the first blue run off the top of the Agazis chairlift at Arizona Snowbowl. It's all about progression and time behind the wheel!
11-26-2012 12:23 AM
tonyisnowhere
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
Now those of us who do ride anywhere, anytime and in any condition can in fact ride ice just as well as any ice coaster. When icy, the nature of our terrain adds a lot more extra challenge to ice riding so a frequent ice riding westerner is probably a better ice rider. Even if all you are doing is riding groomers, our easy blue runs are equivalent to black runs in the east. Now, ride our off piste shit in icy conditions; that separates the men from the boys....
Thanks Snowolf, by the way awesome vids! I am a somewhat of a new rider so I appreciate any info.
I would love to be one of those who do ride anywhere but I am stuck here on my small hills! Maybe once my lkids are bigger I can at least go back to VT or go to Whiteface. but.... I need to go out west. I even have dreams about wanting this experience. Hey maybe I could hire you as a teacher I really want try it all!
11-26-2012 12:11 AM
binarypie
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post

.. snip ..

Trust me, the people who know what they are talking about are not making this mistake! We know the difference between powder, corn, packed powder, frozen granular, sastrugi, styrofoam, rain/sun crust and ice.....

I do however totally concur about skill; that's really what this all boils down to!
Oh I know. I was just making fun. This is the Northeast section we are posting in.
11-25-2012 11:28 PM
tonyisnowhere Well put!! Thanks for the great post you two!
11-25-2012 10:56 PM
Bones I live in the east and ride once a year in the Canadian West.

So does riding in the East somehow make up for not being able to ride in the West?

In a word: no.

Yes we have ice and if we want to ride, then we have to ride ice. Do you learn fine edge control? yes. Do learning fine edge control make a difference? Yes, but nowhere near enough to make up the gap. There's just too much in the West that Easterners just don't get to experience: huge drops, deep powder, gnarly chutes, etc.

A westerner can come here and ride our ice (hating every second of it), but an Easterner is in for a learning curve on their first time on a real mountain in bottomless powder.
11-25-2012 09:51 PM
deeken I have to disagree with that notion that if you can ride on the east coast you can ride anywhere. I started out in VT and learned here for my first year. My skills weren't really progressing until I took a trip out to Tahoe and got a taste of that powder. I did a few days there and my skills drastically went up more in a week there than months on the east coast.

For me it was the confidence you get when falling in soft snow over falling on hard, packed east coast ice. After falling on that east coast ice so much I focused my attention on riding cautiously and avoiding falls. I'm in my mid 30's and I'm pretty big. When I fall it effen hurts. But once you hit the West coast powder and falling doesn't hurt as much, you take a lot more risks and push yourself.

I remember when I got back from my Tahoe trip I had so much confidence that I took a trip to Hunter with my buddies to show off my skills. I was doing great up until I took a nasty fall when I caught an edge and I quickly realized I wasn't in the West coast anymore.
11-25-2012 08:21 AM
tonyisnowhere Thanks for the info all! I do love Vermont. In fact my wife and family want to move there! I learned how to snowboard in Vermont. I live in the NJ/PA area so it isn't easy getting up there. The closest I can get within a 4 hour drive is Belleayre /Hunter/Windham. Otherwise I am stuck with my local hills, Blue, Camelback, Mountain Creek and so on. But I guess time on a mountain is better than no time at all. Now all I have to do is pray for my local weather man to sound like this guy. AccuWeather.com Snowpocalypse Now! Meteorologist Freakout - YouTube
11-25-2012 12:42 AM
poutanen I grew up in the east, moved to the west and can hold my own out here. Mountains are more rugged though and things come out to bite you quick. Take less chances than you do in the well manicured east. Oh and a true powder day will kick your ass at first. Great workout but...
11-25-2012 12:11 AM
binarypie
Quote:
Originally Posted by tonyisnowhere View Post
thank man but I am beginning to feel like everyone is saying this because we are stuck here and it kinda makes us feel better about ice skateboarding...I mean snowboarding.

I hope to make a trip out west soon. I think I just need to experience it.
There are nuances in the skill sets you'll naturally pickup while learning to ride on a specific type of terrain. ice, powder, parks, streets, pipes, etc...

I grew up in Vermont. Smuggs, Stowe, Jay, and Bolton where my places. I did a few trips to NH (Loon), Canada (Mt. St. Louie, Horseshoe) and CO (Vail, Brek, and Copper).

Later in life I lived in Oregon and rode Mt. Hood. That was my first taste of deeper snow on a regular basis.

Now, I ride Kirkwood in Tahoe and I've never seen so much snow (not counting last year. ugh.).

** they say they have ice out here but they really mean hard packed snow. **

From all of this experience I can tell you that my ice-coast heritage only taught me that falling hurts and not to do that. That's it. I'm just slightly more confident on shitty snow conditions than others who grew up here.

However, skill overcomes any sort of perceived advantage in the end.
This thread has more than 10 replies. Click here to review the whole thread.

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

 
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome