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  Topic Review (Newest First)
08-11-2008 09:37 PM
Grimdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowsam17 View Post
ok thanks for all the help. it is clear to me that i need new boots and i will take all of the advice into consideration.

and grimdog, it is clear that you have a totally different definition of the term advanced rider than most people i know, as i would consider near-pro riders to be experts (a notch above advanced). In my standards i am upper intermediate/almost advanced but no where near expert. I can understand how our different perceptions of the term caused some misunderstanding. Also, the reason for the groomers is that i am on the ice coast and everything within five hours of here is almost exclusively groomers. I also play hockey during the winter and am in school so i really have no opportunities to take any trips to the backcountry. I know this makes my snowboarding opportunities fairly limited and i cant wait to get out to the pow as soon as i have the chance. But for now ill have to stick with bombing the groomers and catching air off of any shit i see on the sides of the trail.
It's all relative. Enough said.
08-11-2008 08:29 PM
snowsam17 ok thanks for all the help. it is clear to me that i need new boots and i will take all of the advice into consideration.

and grimdog, it is clear that you have a totally different definition of the term advanced rider than most people i know, as i would consider near-pro riders to be experts (a notch above advanced). In my standards i am upper intermediate/almost advanced but no where near expert. I can understand how our different perceptions of the term caused some misunderstanding. Also, the reason for the groomers is that i am on the ice coast and everything within five hours of here is almost exclusively groomers. I also play hockey during the winter and am in school so i really have no opportunities to take any trips to the backcountry. I know this makes my snowboarding opportunities fairly limited and i cant wait to get out to the pow as soon as i have the chance. But for now ill have to stick with bombing the groomers and catching air off of any shit i see on the sides of the trail.
08-11-2008 02:37 PM
BurtonAvenger The boot doesn't fit your foot shape thats evident by how you're cranking the bindings. You need to find a boot that when you're standing flat in it all sides of the liner are touching you. Then roll right and left in the boot and see if your foot moves first then touches the liner or if it moves all as one. Next while standing flat footed bend your knees deeply and roll forward onto the balls of your foot and see if the heel lifts.
08-11-2008 02:18 PM
Grimdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
I beg to differ. A rider can be a kick ass freeride, Eurocarver, backcountry or what not and have never, ever left the ground or hit a box. I think the almost obsession among snowboarders with park riding has skewed the opinions of what a good rider is based soley on their park skills. This is total BS as I have seen my fair share of park rats who can grind any rail or throw any trick off a kicker, but shit their pants when confronted with a 50 degree pitch and a 2000 foot vertical drop on ungroomed piste. A rider can really be top notch in one area and a newbie in another. AASI is recognizing this in it`s certification process and is moving towards a more Canadian or European system with a seperate Freestyle certification. It is now easier for older riders to gain their cert 2 and 3 without having to master all of the park skills that many older bodies just can`t take any more. These riders may have been tearing it up as younger guys, but just can`t do it anymore, yet have a wealth of experience to pass on as instructors and managers. The AASI freestyle rating allows younger instructors who can just rip it in the park to fill a niche also; it is a win win for instructors and customers alike.

To answer your boot question, Burton Avenger is right. Even though heel lift may not be a problem, the boot sounds too big at least in some places for your foot. I would suggest a boot with a medium stiffness rating for your riding goals with starting to learn park where a bit of give is a good thing, but still having the support for all mountain riding. I am not up to speed on women`s boots, but in general, I would advise you to try lots of pairs on and make sure to walk aroung or run in the boots to really get a good feel. Having a demo board with bindings in the store to strap into to get a real feel is also very helpfull. When doing this trying on thing, try to pick the shop you will ultimately buy from as the time these people invest in boot fiting is wasted if you don`t buy boots from them.
I guess Iím being a little over critical and donít want to beat the topic to death as the real question is about boot fit, but since skill level was referred to as a possible explanation for the boots not working I had to have an a-hole moment. My interpretation of an advanced rider would be someone a couple steps away from being sponsored and/or turning pro, someone that has the skill level to work as a guide in the backcountry, or someone who could be a level 4 instructor. Iíve been riding for 21 seasons straight, am comfortable with any run on the mountain, and would consider myself a good intermediate though that may be me being a humble Canadian. There are a lot of examples on this forum and others where noobs flop around in the park for a season before they actually learn any fundamental skills and call themselves an advanced rider. Iím not sure why this bugs me but it does. I definitely agree that someone can be an advanced rider and have never been nor have any interest in riding park. My deduction came from the comment that the original poster rode ďmostly groomers,Ē so I guess they could be an advanced groomer rider. Anyhow, enough said, any more discussion can be started on another thread.

Iím sure you were not being literal but if you are an advance backcountry, eurocarver, or freerider, your board has definitely left the ground.

snowsam17, good luck in your quest for the perfect fitting boot. Take to heart what Snowolf and Burton Avenger have to say as they know what they are talking about and have some of the most experience of anyone on this forum.
08-11-2008 01:16 PM
snowsam17 ok thanks for all the help snowolf
08-11-2008 09:47 AM
snowsam17 ok well i just feel that the boots are not responsive enough to be able to handle the turns that i make at speed.

what i meant was that it doesnt matter what you define my riding as. even if you think i am only intermediate or whatever, i still feel the boots are inadequate. I like to bomb down groomers, and the boots just dont feel right. i wasnt looking to start an argument.
08-11-2008 09:29 AM
Grimdog
Quote:
Originally Posted by snowsam17 View Post
im actually almost positive the boot is the right size because my toes touch the front slightly and they are pretty snug on my foot. I normally wear a size 8 show but the bots are size 6. Could it just be the shape of the boot that isnt fitting right? Well im probably just gonna head over to the shop and try on as many boots as they have until i find something that feels perfect.

And as far as the riding abiility thing, i was just estimating, im not really sure where i fall so call me whatever you want. Its not really related to my question anyway.
Actually in your original post you suggested that your problem may be that you have outgrown them skill wise so that would make your ability relevant to the question.
08-11-2008 08:52 AM
snowsam17 im actually almost positive the boot is the right size because my toes touch the front slightly and they are pretty snug on my foot. I normally wear a size 8 show but the bots are size 6. Could it just be the shape of the boot that isnt fitting right? Well im probably just gonna head over to the shop and try on as many boots as they have until i find something that feels perfect.

And as far as the riding abiility thing, i was just estimating, im not really sure where i fall so call me whatever you want. Its not really related to my question anyway.
08-10-2008 07:45 PM
Grimdog Don't mean to be a dick but if you are "just venturing" into the park you are nowhere near an advanced rider.
08-10-2008 06:21 PM
BurtonAvenger Actually your boot is too big for you and thats why you're having all those issues.
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