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Thread: "The Fear" Snowboarding Psychology Coaching? Reply to Thread
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  Topic Review (Newest First)
02-13-2013 11:51 AM
Soggysnow
Quote:
Originally Posted by makken View Post
fear is a greater obstacle than any feature you can find in a park.

i'm really trying to start learning some inversion tricks, specifically a barrel roll, but i can't grow the nuts to actually throw one. i don't really have any powder fields to practice in. does anyone have any progressions for me to work my way up? or will i just have to suck it up and do it?
Quote:
Originally Posted by tflock82 View Post
im at the same point as you! i just have nowhere to practice them, ive done a couple of tamedogs(frontflips) and broke a board, i tried again after 2 weeks and broke another board, now i have a nice board that i really cant afford to break it again. now im working on barrel rolls , seems like its not as straining on my equipment.
I was having a conversation with a coach this weekend just gone on exactly this. WB does not allow teaching of inverted tricks. Its a bit of a catch 22 really, they do not want to be responsible, but then you have people who get to that point in their progression that want to learn and are having to figure it out with no real training on how to do it as safely as possible.
Tricky.
02-12-2013 05:45 PM
neni I've never got injured while snowboarding but I got two neck discs ruptured doing my other favorite sport (cross country riding) and since you ask about ones personal fear management strategies I think my experience might fit. I was heavily scared of going back in the saddle again. The first half year I rode with a neck stabilizing protector (collar?) and did each jump with fear and tension. I continuously got more scared, less concentrated and didn't dare to approach obstacles with enought impulsion. Shortly after I got a thumb dislocated and tendons ruptured, and when I further hit a tree hard I had to give it a break before something serious would happen.

I began to concentrate on the basics for half a year, did only small but technical jumps, things I could manage with ease and thus build up new confidence and have my muscles notrelaxe. and went riding on race tracks (without obstacles) to learn to enjoy the speed again. I've not compleatly recovered from the fear of getting the neck injured again... if a jump scares me, I mentally repeat the approach-fly-land movements over and over and over again and - most important - breathe very consciously and get everything else out of focus.


Hope, you'll overcome your block soon. Keep trying, but don't put yourself under too much pressure
02-12-2013 05:37 PM
tflock82
Quote:
Originally Posted by makken View Post
fear is a greater obstacle than any feature you can find in a park.

i'm really trying to start learning some inversion tricks, specifically a barrel roll, but i can't grow the nuts to actually throw one. i don't really have any powder fields to practice in. does anyone have any progressions for me to work my way up? or will i just have to suck it up and do it?
im at the same point as you! i just have nowhere to practice them, ive done a couple of tamedogs(frontflips) and broke a board, i tried again after 2 weeks and broke another board, now i have a nice board that i really cant afford to break it again. now im working on barrel rolls , seems like its not as straining on my equipment.
02-12-2013 04:12 PM
makken fear is a greater obstacle than any feature you can find in a park.

i'm really trying to start learning some inversion tricks, specifically a barrel roll, but i can't grow the nuts to actually throw one. i don't really have any powder fields to practice in. does anyone have any progressions for me to work my way up? or will i just have to suck it up and do it?
02-12-2013 02:49 PM
Casual I'm 35 and I ride park 1-2 times per week, at my age injuries come easy and last a long time. I'm just getting over a shoulder injury from a boardslide on a down box. The box was damaged and I caught an edge on it, not really my fault but that instilled the fear again.

These are some tactics I use to overcome it.

1. Work up to it slowly. Do tricks I'm solid at and build confidence, then start working on whatever it is I want to learn on a small feature, even if thats just flat ground and I imagine its a feature. Then to a ride on, then a jump on and then a rail for example.

2. Visualize. This has always been a key for me, if i can't see myself do it I can't do it. I picture myself doing the entire trick from my line, the trick and the landing/ride away. I do this several times before I go.

3. As I'm approaching I stay loose and I tell myself specific things. If I need to turn my head for example I will say "stay calm, turn your head, stay calm, turn your head" on my approach (I'm telling you this is a golden tactic). What you should never do is tell yourself what not to do because almost guaranteed you WILL do it. Do not say stuff like "Don't panic, don't fall, don't freak out" etc. Guess what your brain hears? --->>> Panic! FREAK OUT! FALL!!

Try it - Take a run and say "don't freak out" and see if that calms you down. Next run say "stay calm" and I bet you $1000 it will be more effective. I got this tactic from a psychologist- the word "don't" gets illiminated when your under stress and your brain only hears the following command... so don't freak out becomes freak out... the mind is a crazy thing.

4. Ok so last but not least my tactic to get over the thinking process of sitting above a feature staring it down. Once you have your visualization, and you know what your going to tell yourself on your approach. Just say to yourself "no think just go". lol. My best friend gave me this Jackie Chan quote and I've been using it for years.

Hope this helps... works for me.
02-12-2013 01:54 PM
brucew. You should probably wait until your concussion symptoms disappear before you try riding again, I'm sure thats contributing to your fear. When you're vulnerable from an existing injury there's no way to keep those thoughts out of your head. If you're not wearing a helmet I'd also consider getting one.


What I do for overcoming fear is take a few moments at the top of the line to come up with a plan, visualize the plan...put on a song that gets me amped, take a few deep breaths to clear my mind and drop in fully committed & confident. I try not to think too long before dropping in or else you can pysch yourself out.
02-12-2013 01:26 PM
MeanJoe I completely understand where this OP is coming from. I have a big mental "fear" block on gaps getting onto boxes. Ride on box, I'll go play on it and work on my fundamentals. If it has a gap, it paralyzes me. I wuss out every time. I'm still trying to figure out how to mentally get over this hurdle but I had a small victory this weekend at my local resort...

They had set-up a picnic table box, fairly long. I had been lapping the upper park, hitting the small jump line they built there but kept eye-balling that picnic table box. I finally decided to try it and on the first run approached it but the gap got into my head and I turned off at the last moment and rode past it. The second run at it, I decided to just ride by and take a good look at the transition and gap. I guess I thought I'd see it and realize it wasn't that big and with the angle of the transition and distance of the gap mentally accept that as long as I had forward momentum the nose of my board would clear it. So back up the lift I went for my third run to try this damn picnic table...

At the top of the drop-in (with my fiancé and my buddies hanging out to watch), I stopped and was mostly trying to mentally visualize my approach, visualizing myself clearing the gap and pushing down flat on the box, running through my body position on the feature - shoulders square to the feature with knees bent and loose and eyes on the end of the box, and all those other things to psych myself up when... a 6 year old girl in a pink snowboard outfit dropped in ahead of me and nailed the picnic table box.

Shit, shit, shit!

No way I could wuss out again, not in front of the Future Mrs. MeanJoe and my guy buddies after a 6 year old girl in pink rode it like it was nothing. I dropped in and hit it. I was going a bit too slow and had a little trouble off the box at the end but on the next run I owned that damn picnic table box.

So sometimes maybe the proper motivation will get you over that fear.
02-12-2013 12:48 PM
Soggysnow Thanks
I was originally aiming to make this a more general thread on what has halted other members own progression on whatever jump/trick/feature and how they over came it. A collection of different ways one might try to get results.

I have not wanted to avoid doing something and wanted to do it at the same so much time since first learning how to ride. Its an ongoing mental/physical battle that I am sure will continue the rest of my boarding days.
02-12-2013 12:00 AM
Soggysnow
Quote:
Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
This may have already been asked, but are you able to get someone to record you hitting the feature?
Hi, no I don't have someone that can record. I had a coach from roxy camp take a pic the other day (which they have...hopefully I can get my hands on through fb or something) but the pic they took was one of my better efforts(back board) on a box which I have crashed on and been a bit timid of but am back to hitting again (its super easy mind)
I might see if I can get someone too next weekend, will have to have a hike day, may be able to make it happen sooner, but work etc....
02-11-2013 10:17 PM
Efilnikufesin Breathing is good as Wrath said as well as mental imagery. Take some deep long slow breaths till you feel relaxed, oxygen is a natural sedative in that way.

While taking these deep breaths picture yourself performing the manuever you are looking to accomplish over and over feeling how each body movement is going to occurr as you are completing it.

Never think about the failure of the event while doing it, stay relaxed loose and confident in yourself that it is something you will accomplish. Don't think you might do it, know you are going to do it.

On a side note, make sure that concussion is rested up enough before you head out there.
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