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Old 11-23-2013, 08:31 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Waterproofing Windstopper

Is this an effective method/route to take for gloves and Mitts?
What products work, if so?

Researching seems to point to Oven Mitts from Burton are very cozy. The rub being Windstopper fabric isnt the best for keeping out moisture.
Dick's has the Mitts for 89 bucks! Seems like a great deal for very warm fingers, but I may have some wet warm fingers, versus dry warm fingers.

Thanks everyone.
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Old 11-23-2013, 08:37 AM   #2 (permalink)
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Level Snowboarding Gloves & Ski Race Gloves | Free Shipping

Love these. Very warm, built in wrist protection.
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Old 11-23-2013, 05:07 PM   #3 (permalink)
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I believe Windstopper is just a softshell with a windproof membrane.

I would wash it by hand in Atsko Sport Wash then apply your favorite waterproofing spray (NOT wash in!) and either iron or dry on as high of heat setting as the garment allows.

I'd recommend Atsko Permanent Water-Guard or Grangers XT. They both contain fluorocarbons, which is what most factory DWR's are. Heat activation is key with either of these products, as is making sure that you are applying them on a clean garment. NEVER use regular detergents on performance fabrics as they can not only clog the breathable membranes (Gore-Tex) but they can also leave residues on the fabric that prevents the DWR from beading water properly.
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Old 11-23-2013, 06:47 PM   #4 (permalink)
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they do have a level of waterproofing to them, i'm unsure what it is. My buddy that skis has a pair and has never complained about wet hands; sweaty hands are a different story
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:27 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I usually use the Nikwax.com wash-in waterproofing stuff... usually the Tech Wash and TX.Direct package from REI

Nikwax Hard-shell Outerwear Care Kit - Free Shipping at REI.com
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Old 11-24-2013, 10:30 PM   #6 (permalink)
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No. If you want waterproof, buy waterproof. Anything else is putting a bandaid on a shotgun wound.
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Old 11-24-2013, 11:12 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linvillegorge View Post
No. If you want waterproof, buy waterproof.
+1

I can't speak for the other products, but the Nikwax line of stuff is great for cleaning and renewing the DWR on fabric that uses DWR as its breathable waterproofing. It doesn't do anything for non-DWR treated fabric.

Don't waste your money on trying to waterproof non-waterproof gear, it won't work.
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Old 11-25-2013, 07:26 AM   #8 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bones View Post
+1

I can't speak for the other products, but the Nikwax line of stuff is great for cleaning and renewing the DWR on fabric that uses DWR as its breathable waterproofing. It doesn't do anything for non-DWR treated fabric.

Don't waste your money on trying to waterproof non-waterproof gear, it won't work.
The stuff seems to work on my bibs....

Of course, the stuff does a great job renewing the waterproofing on my jacket.
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Old 11-25-2013, 12:08 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Nikwax (specifically the wash in type) is what you want to stay away from if your fabric has a breathable membrane. It's wax based so it clogs the pours in the membrane, leaving you to get coated in your own sweat. And it's not as durable as an actual fluoro dwr which means you'll have to reapply more frequently.
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Old 11-25-2013, 08:22 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jibfreak View Post
Nikwax (specifically the wash in type) is what you want to stay away from if your fabric has a breathable membrane. It's wax based so it clogs the pours in the membrane, leaving you to get coated in your own sweat. And it's not as durable as an actual fluoro dwr which means you'll have to reapply more frequently.
That is not really correct. Nikwash, including the wash-in type, is perfectly fine.

Some background: Most factory-applied DWR are fluorcarbon based. A number of re-proofing products (Granger, etc.) also use such fluorocarbons. In contrast Nikwax is a wax-based polymer (but not actually wax). Both types work just fine for tech fabrics (unlike silicone or simple wax products).
Main difference is that fluorocarbons are persistent molecules that do not degrade in nature and some have been shown to have carcinogenic properties. Most manufacturers have worked to remove the most problematic compounds (such as perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and
perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA)) from their products and/or change to shorter polymer chains (like the C6 fluorocarbon used by Granger).
The basic Nikwax polymer does not have the persistence issue or health concerns. It also does not require tumble drying to bond to the fabric. However, it has been reported to be less durable.

Both fluoro based and Nikwash can be applied as spray-on or wash-in and neither will 'clog the pours' [sic] or affect breathability. The wash-in is slightly more convenient, but there are reports (anecdotal - I have not seen any proper studies) that it does not perform as well as the spray-on, especially for Nikwax. I also prefer the spray-on, because it lets you target specific areas of the garment (e.g., shoulders if using backpack).
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