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-   -   Nitro Team Gullwing Review (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/snowboard-reviews/21779-nitro-team-gullwing-review.html)

supercollider 12-24-2009 04:35 PM

Nitro Team Gullwing Review
 
5'10, 180-185. I got a couple of days in at Mammoth on the team gullwing 159, regular width. We got buried in snow.

First off, it rides smaller than some other boards out there due to the scoop in the nose and tail. This shortens your effective edge.
For Example, the 159 has a 120 cm Effective edge. A Never Summer SL-R 158 has 123, and a K2 Slayblade 158 has 124.
The Minus side is you ride a larger board than you would normally, but the plus side is that you have a long tip and tail for the pow. Also, the Tapered ends are light, so you don't really feel like your're riding a bigger board.
I compared it to a K2 JibPan 158 (Last years, reg. camber) and the JibPan felt way longer. You could see it when you got on the board. So It doesn't feel as big as a board like the never summer SL-R.

It charges really well, I felt fast and stable the whole time. Butters, ollies nice. It has a very playful flex. It took me about two runs to get used to the camber and then I was good to go. Stability seemed good for me, I could really go fast on it and stay in control.

I like having the Camber at the tips for charging, it really feels good to get those tips pressing into the snow. Also the board had a good surfy feel in powder due to the natural rocker. You could lay a turn from a more centered stance, and the board would just bend from the middle and whip around.

One note about the sidecut. It's different from alot of others. It's very straight from the tips but has a lot of bend between the feet. This means entering and exiting turns are very stable, but you have spot in the middle of the turn where the board just whips around. If you're aware of it it's not a problem but for a rider who's used to a constant radius sidecut it may seem odd at first. It was designed this way to avoid hooking when spinning and landing off balance, and it seems to work. Also, in straight lines it's pretty easy to relax and not worry about catching an edge.

Lastly, I'd have to comment on the base. I don't know if it was the wax or what (I used toko Cold/Warm 80/20, my buddy used Bluebird/Swix) but I was way faster than my him and alot of others on the flats, runouts, etc all weekend.. He had a new Never Summer Evo-R with a fresh coat of wax on it.

I can't really say how it did in choppy/cruddy snow, because it dropped about 4-5 feet(!) that weekend, so it was all powder and groomers with good snow. (Heh heh.) I have a hunch it would do fine though...

To me the toss up would be between this board and a never summer . I could probably drop down a size in the NS if I wanted to, just because of the edge length. Haven't demoed one yet.

lorcar 01-31-2010 06:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by supercollider (Post 225715)


One note about the sidecut. It's different from alot of others. It's very straight from the tips but has a lot of bend between the feet. This means entering and exiting turns are very stable, but you have spot in the middle of the turn where the board just whips around. [...] It was designed this way to avoid hooking when spinning and landing off balance, and it seems to work.

very interesting, and a good point indeed.
I had this in mind, but I am not sure I completely understood what happens once you are on the board after you set your turns. What does it mean "whips around"? does it mean that looking at your sign on the snow it will not be a smooth continuous line?
what is the hooking supposed to be avoided through the gullwing?

supercollider 02-01-2010 06:16 PM

Whips around = you are carving a very long arc in the beginning of the turn, but once you center your weight over the middle of the board, the very tight sidecut in the middle of te board takes over and the board starts trying to make a much tighter turn than it was previously.

Hooking means catching the edge, on some models where there is a tight sidecut towards the tip and tail, you can be spinning or jumping (or both :) ) and all of the sudden the board starts to turn sharply during landing, this can be undesirable. Nitro gave this board a very mellow sidecut at the ends in order to avoid this

Veccster 02-02-2010 11:32 PM

Great review - Thank you!

I am looking at both the Nitro Gullwing and the NS SL-R (or maybe EVO). Any further of a comparison to the SL-R? Is it a lighter board?

Any idea how the flex compares?
- Gullwing has an "all terrain" flex
- SL-R has a "5" flex
...............:dunno:

supercollider 02-03-2010 01:15 PM

No Problem.
Well, as it happens, I have an SL-R right now. I Got my board nitro from DogFunk, so I had the option of returning it. Eventually, I did, but it took me alot of runs and switching off between boards (team gullwing and sl-r) to do so.
The basic summary is this: I feel like the Team Gullwing is more fun to ride and play around on, the SL-R is a bit more of a charger ride. Not by much though.
Head to head, I'd say they compare as such:
A 159 Team Gullwing Compares to a 158 Sl-R, and you could possibly go shorter on the sl-r. They have a really long contact length for their size, whereas the nitro has a shorter contact length for size. There are plusses and minuses to this.

-Sidecuts: Totally Different. The SL-R has more sidecut overall, and Wants to carve a shorter turn. The Team Gullwing Likes a to straight line it, as long as you don't use the middle part of the sidecut. Also, Vario grip works. I could really feel it kicking in on Icy turns.
-Stability: Due to the sidecut, the Team gullwing is more stable pointing it (It is less catchy), but when on edge I'd give it to the Sl-R. It has more dampening so it has less chatter, and also a much longer contact length. This causes your heel edge to skip out less. Pretty close on edging though.
-Flex: Close. The Nitro is a bit softer, but felt poppier. I think the SL-R is going to soften up a lot though. My friends did, and I've heard that about never summers. I have no problem with that. Disregard comparing a board by "Nitro says all mountain flex, but never summer says flex is a 5" One company's 5 is another company's 7.
-Weight: Nitro is lighter hands down, which leads to...
-Durability: Never summer, hands down. Nitro's well built, but you're talking about never summer here. The base is more durable than the nitro base as well. Although I do think Nitro is better built than last year. They're using one piece bases now rather than those die cut bases which would pop out. (that blew). The nitro took some rail shots and handled it, but I rode over some stuff on the Never summer that I though was going to hurt and the board still looks awesome.
-Base: Nitro base is much faster. Pretty much every nitro base I've ridden seems faster than any of my other friends. This one is no different. It doesn't even look sintered, it looks like it's extruded or syntruded, but it's still much faster.
-Freestyle - I'd give this to the Nitro, it's got shorter edge length, feels easier to spin and is lighter.
-Jumps - either or. That degressive sidecut works for the nitro, but the NS is great too.
-Rails - Are you kidding me? I'm 34.
-Charging - Never summer. See stability.
-Powder - In a foot and under, I'd say either board, but if it's deeper, I'd actually say nitro. It's got a much longer tip and tail which helps. Plus that Gullwing Camber combined with the deep side cut in the middle makes the board really fun to turn in powder. Just stomp on the middle of the board and it wants to spring around like a surfboard or something. It was really fun.

Overall, I picked the Never summer because I knew it was more durable, and I felt like it was more capable Off Piste. However, it was really hard to pick, and the nitro just felt like more fun in alot of conditions. Also, I knew the NS would get great resale if I wanted to ditch it later in the season, and they were selling out. I wouldn't kick either board out of bed...

patongue 03-02-2010 05:27 PM

Hey guys,

I just picked up a Team Gullwing 157, or have one on order I mean. However when I look at this site, it looks like I need a 162? Don't want to be toe dragging. Can anyone share their experiences? my current board's a 156, but now I'm reading about this board riding short.

Nitro Men's Snowboard Size Chart - 2010 | evo

I'm 5'10, 165 lbs, with size 10 boots.

supercollider 03-02-2010 05:30 PM

I'd stick with the regular width, not the wide. I think you could go with the 159 or 157, depending on whether you bomb runs or hit the park more. What's your current board?
Edit: Just checked that size chart you're looking at, I'd say it's screwed up somehow. It says the regular width goes up to a size 9 and the wides start at 11.5 that's a pretty ridiculous gap. If you're a 10, you can definitely ride the regular (width of 25.2)

patongue 03-02-2010 06:17 PM

yes the sizing chart really weirds me out, until I saw Team had a sizing of 162 for feet 9.5-11.
To me, that's strange - my current board is some 156 firefly something. So when I saw 162 - thought it was weird. I guess i'm riding 157 for all mountain!

supercollider 03-02-2010 06:23 PM

Wow, I had to look firefly up. I think you're gonna be stoked regardless. The nitro's a snappy, fun board.

Triple8Sol 03-02-2010 10:56 PM

Much thanks for the detailed review...seriously. I have an NS SL-R 158 right now and love it for a daily driver. However, when I'm bombing with friends, I do wish I had just a little bit more tip/tail length and a little more stiffness. No complaints about the dampening or speed of the base at all, of course. With Sierra's crazy deals going on now, I was seriously considering the Gullwing, but after reading your review I'm pretty sure I'll pass. Sounds like back to my latest plan of getting a Heritage-R or maybe even Premier F1-R or Lib Dark Series C2.


Quote:

Originally Posted by supercollider (Post 248493)
No Problem.
Well, as it happens, I have an SL-R right now. I Got my board nitro from DogFunk, so I had the option of returning it. Eventually, I did, but it took me alot of runs and switching off between boards (team gullwing and sl-r) to do so.
The basic summary is this: I feel like the Team Gullwing is more fun to ride and play around on, the SL-R is a bit more of a charger ride. Not by much though.
Head to head, I'd say they compare as such:
A 159 Team Gullwing Compares to a 158 Sl-R, and you could possibly go shorter on the sl-r. They have a really long contact length for their size, whereas the nitro has a shorter contact length for size. There are plusses and minuses to this.

-Sidecuts: Totally Different. The SL-R has more sidecut overall, and Wants to carve a shorter turn. The Team Gullwing Likes a to straight line it, as long as you don't use the middle part of the sidecut. Also, Vario grip works. I could really feel it kicking in on Icy turns.
-Stability: Due to the sidecut, the Team gullwing is more stable pointing it (It is less catchy), but when on edge I'd give it to the Sl-R. It has more dampening so it has less chatter, and also a much longer contact length. This causes your heel edge to skip out less. Pretty close on edging though.
-Flex: Close. The Nitro is a bit softer, but felt poppier. I think the SL-R is going to soften up a lot though. My friends did, and I've heard that about never summers. I have no problem with that. Disregard comparing a board by "Nitro says all mountain flex, but never summer says flex is a 5" One company's 5 is another company's 7.
-Weight: Nitro is lighter hands down, which leads to...
-Durability: Never summer, hands down. Nitro's well built, but you're talking about never summer here. The base is more durable than the nitro base as well. Although I do think Nitro is better built than last year. They're using one piece bases now rather than those die cut bases which would pop out. (that blew). The nitro took some rail shots and handled it, but I rode over some stuff on the Never summer that I though was going to hurt and the board still looks awesome.
-Base: Nitro base is much faster. Pretty much every nitro base I've ridden seems faster than any of my other friends. This one is no different. It doesn't even look sintered, it looks like it's extruded or syntruded, but it's still much faster.
-Freestyle - I'd give this to the Nitro, it's got shorter edge length, feels easier to spin and is lighter.
-Jumps - either or. That degressive sidecut works for the nitro, but the NS is great too.
-Rails - Are you kidding me? I'm 34.
-Charging - Never summer. See stability.
-Powder - In a foot and under, I'd say either board, but if it's deeper, I'd actually say nitro. It's got a much longer tip and tail which helps. Plus that Gullwing Camber combined with the deep side cut in the middle makes the board really fun to turn in powder. Just stomp on the middle of the board and it wants to spring around like a surfboard or something. It was really fun.

Overall, I picked the Never summer because I knew it was more durable, and I felt like it was more capable Off Piste. However, it was really hard to pick, and the nitro just felt like more fun in alot of conditions. Also, I knew the NS would get great resale if I wanted to ditch it later in the season, and they were selling out. I wouldn't kick either board out of bed...



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