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Old 11-11-2008, 07:14 AM   #1 (permalink)
CliveCucumber
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Default Never Summer SL-R for a first-timer?

Hi all,

I know a lot of people have posted a similar question, but everyone has their unique features so my turn to try and get your advise:

I'm going boarding for the first time this February to Verbier. I'm 5'11 and about 190lbs. I'm ideally looking to buy a board that will not only help a complete beginner get to grips with the sport but also last me several seasons as I improve. Also, I'm a fan of subtle design so, although not the most important factor, I would always choose a nice simple design over some of the louder graphics out there (for example, I like some of the simple Arbor boards, KZ zero, Burton EcoNico, etc.)

I've been trying to research the right board and keep coming across the Never Summer SL-R which seems to not only get great reviews but has a nice design. So, the million dollar question, is this a good board for me? If not what would you recommend? If it is, then what bindings should I go for?

Thanks in advance for any help.

Last edited by CliveCucumber; 11-11-2008 at 07:15 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 11-11-2008, 07:52 AM   #2 (permalink)
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You should rent the first few times.
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Old 11-11-2008, 08:04 AM   #3 (permalink)
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I was originally going to hire but as the cost of rental is so high I'd generally prefer to buy a board than throw money at rental.

For example, to rent a board will cost 100 for a week but you can buy a board for 200-300. If I snowboard more than 2 to 3 times then I will cover the cost of rental - and I already have 2 trips planned this winter.

If thats the way to go then let me know but didn't think it made sense on a long term view.

Thanks
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Old 11-11-2008, 09:44 AM   #4 (permalink)
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I agree with your logic. I'd also rather buy a board then rent it but I guess he was trying to tell you that as a beginner you should first get some experience as to find out what your riding style is and what style you prefer. will you be riding park, groomers, pow? You'll find out eventually...

A board is not just a board. The shape, size and weight of all the boards out there make a huge difference in riding style and fun factor.

But to be honest, I bet you probably sort of made up your mind anyway and really want to get the board anyway and we're just here to help your conscience get on its way So, here's my very subjective advice since I just bought the Never Summer Legacy-R (I gots the big feet), its a really fun board and you'll love it. The SL is the same version as the Legacy but with the normal waist width.

Seriously, if money's not a real issue, go for it. You can't go wrong with SL. Oh yeah and I got me the Burton Cartel 07/08 bindings for the board. The good value for your money. If you ask around, somewhere along the line someone will probably also mention the Rome 390 bindings. But its also a personal preference and thats another thing you'll find out once you get out there and test ride your buddies' board or someone else's.

Have fun and don't give up. Bruises are part of the good memories
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Old 11-11-2008, 10:02 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Thanks for that response - you have nailed my thoughts exactly.

Money is not really a massive issue and I would prefer to buy for 300 then 'throw away' 100. So if I follow that logic then is that the best choice of board? The reviews seem to suggsest it can handle park, freestyle and everything well enough for anything I will be doing in the near future.

Thanks for you input - anyone else got any thoughts?
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Old 11-11-2008, 10:58 AM   #6 (permalink)
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If you're just asking if the SL is a good board? Yes, its definitely a good board, IMO better than average. And I'm assuming you're somewhere in the UK, so you've also got your Never Summer rep sitting in your country which makes it much easier to contact them just in case you should make use of the 3 year warranty they give you. Do you know what...phone them up and just ask them the same question. They're really approachable. I did the same when I had a few questions about their boards. I have been riding for 5 years now and I'm really stoked about my Legacy-R. Perhaps in your situation the best thing about the Board is the "R"...the rocker tech, which makes it so much easier not catching any edge. You'll know the difference once you try out a different board with a normal camber base.

But if you're just generally asking which is the best choice of boards for your purposes...be prepared for heaps of different opinions, since everybody will have their own opinion on their best choice of board. The SL for one will def handle the park/pipe and groomers.

Here's maybe another option: do you have a chance to visit one of those indoor ski/snowboard centers then do that first, rent a board, learn to ride so that you advance to the point of where you're able to link turns and then try to demo a board in the indoor center....and then get the NS SL you see I'm still really stoked on the Never Summer board
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Old 11-11-2008, 02:12 PM   #7 (permalink)
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If I'm reading his question right, it's not so much that he wants to know if it's a good board, or if we think it's a good idea for him to buy instead of rent. I think he's asking if the SL-R is a particularly good board to learn on, and/or does NS's rocker make for a more forgiving, easier board for a beginner to get acclimated on. If that wasn't actually his question, then it is mine.
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Old 11-11-2008, 03:41 PM   #8 (permalink)
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I'm not to sure how to answer that. Its as if I would have to tell someone that its easier to learn to ride a bike on a no-name brand bike vs. a professional bike used in the tour de france. In the beginning the only importance would be that the bike has wheels, pedals and some handle bars. Once you know how to ride a bike you will want to have a lighter bike, niftier pedals, better gear system etc. and thats when you notice the difference between "good" and "better" quality equipment.

Same with the board. Its a really good make of board. Never Summer is known for its quality boards. I can't say anything specifically for the SL-R, since I only own the Legacy-R, but it should be similar. Only the rocker tech is where I could give my 2 cents and yes, IMO it should make it easier and more forgiving for a beginner as you'll probably won't catch an edge as easily as with a cambered board. I'm not saying you won't ever catch an edge...trust me, it WILL happen and its part of the learning curve and part of the fun. But the R should help out a bit.

So IMHO, yes the board should help out at the beginning, less catching an edge and through the rocker its easier to turn the board, so going from edge-to-edge is a breeze. So its a good learning board and once you gain confidence and your skills improve you won't have to go out and get a new improved board since the SL-R is at a top level already.

But come on everybody knows, you'll buy a new board within the next three years anyways as you want to try something new or want to have another design or some board company introduces its new tech which 'revolutionizes' snowboarding and you want to try that out too. So the SL-R will def treat you nice the next three years and after that be a good enhancement to your quiver of boards in the future
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Old 11-16-2008, 09:23 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Hey guys. Im going into my 8th season (i think?) and ive had my 05' SL for 3 seasons. It is an amazing board and im planning on ordering the 09' SL-R any time now, but for a board to start riding i wouldn't recomend it. Renting is great to feel out different boards, but if thats really not what you want to do then maybe try borrowing a friends to try out. At the same time, this is just to find something comfortable for you to learn on, you wont notice the small changes in boards like fuzz said until your more experienced. The SL is really responsive but its also rigid. Im an instructor too and to learn how to snowboard it really helps to have a more flexible board. When your learning you need something that is going to bend to the weight you put into it, because until you build your confidence in your turning you wont be putting everything into your turns, and having to fight a more regid board would be really frustrating. Now im 6' and 160 but when i got it i was 5'10 and 145ish, and i found i had to realllly put alot into it to get the response needed from it, even on steeper gradients. That being said i didnt weigh as much then so its a bit of give and take, but this board will excel once you can really push it. For learning though, I would personally recomend a lower end burton or something. Put your money into some kick ass boots and bindings. Good boots are amazing (i ride burton rulers which arent even that high end) and maybe something like the cartels for bindings. Theres no point in a sweet board if your bindings suck so get something responsive and nice/comfy that you can carry over to your next deck. For a board id go with something with a good deal of flex and inexpensive. And then next season I'd jump on an SL, or different NS board if your looking for a more specific riding style.

As for the board itself, it does have camber to. check the site { SL-R } Never Summer Boards the SL-R has both rocker and camber technology. click on the yellow "New" it will explain it. Anyway with my own NS Ive taken it into powder, bowls, moguls, the park, all-mountain freeriding and just straight jibbing and its never let me down. Its a ton of fun, responsive, super smooth even at high speeds and butters like a dream.

Goodluck man

Last edited by Venture; 11-17-2008 at 02:18 AM.
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Old 11-19-2008, 09:45 AM   #10 (permalink)
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i guess if moneys not really an issue then go for it, but a neversummer board is a bit above a beginner in quality. youll probably trash it pretty good before you ever become good enough to appreciate it, and then you'll end up buying another board anyways
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