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Old 08-06-2014, 11:41 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Do it yourself 3d printing

Did anyone catch that Home Depot last month partnered with Makerbot 3d printers and will be doing in store demo's as well as selling them online? I was scouring the internet reading a lot of various articles from Bloomberg, Slate, LA Times, etc. etc. on this and it seems the mass consensus is that for those of us under 45 currently we will all end up with one in our house to aid in DIY fixes.

What struck me as interesting is that Burton has had a 3d printer for years in their prototype test facility and I've seen the bindings they've made and they are rideable. But now DIYer's could theoretically make a binding in their home or at least fix those obscure parts that are hard as hell to find a replacement for when they break.

I'm curious if any of you guys out there with the engineering mind that have done DIY boards or other snowboard specific things would consider this?

For those that want a little more perspective here's a shameless plug to an article I wrote. 3D Printing and the Future of Do It Yourself Snowboarding Innovation « But if you want other links I can post up the ones to Bloomberg and what not as well.
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Old 08-06-2014, 11:54 AM   #2 (permalink)
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The cautionary issue I have is materials are not all the same. I suspect a 3d printed binding disk would have a tough go at it given the stresses and temperature variances. Yes, I've seen the 3d printed 'guns'. From a material stand point I'm just not sure it makes sense.

Yes kreo may fit together with legos, but hold the two in your hand and its a no brainer which is which.
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Old 08-06-2014, 12:18 PM   #3 (permalink)
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we had 3d printers at school and it took about 36 hours to print a 4" x 4" model and cost about $180 in resin. and the result was not really top notch. this was about 4 years ago, so who knows what has happened since.

I honestly don't think the quality of the plastic is an issue. they make sure you use top notch (i.e. very $$$) resin, which I would assume is better than what goes through the factories in China. if anything you can get creative and find ways around it. you can 3d-print a mold for example and pour whatever material you want in it. and I've seen demos where they would print with different consistencies, so part of the model was solid and another part was rubbery, yet there were not joints between the two.
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Old 08-06-2014, 12:47 PM   #4 (permalink)
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The biggest issue is the size constraints of each printer. You would need a minimum print volume ~10"x6"x4" to make a reliable binding baseplate.

2nd would be material for specific parts being replicated.
ABS - medium impact resistance, medium heat resistance, medium print difficulty
PLA - low impact resistance worse heat resistance, easy print difficulty
PC (polycarbonate) - Better all around, harder to get a good 3d print (requires alot of temperature monitoring)

Not sure if the makerbots are capable of using polycarbonate. If you are trying to replicate a boot plastic clip or BOA ratchet ABS would be good just make sure it's thicker than the original for safety. Binding pieces will all vary for strength, impact resistance, and heat resistance requirements. If you're trying to make a new heel cup or high back then you need to match to the existing sizes and watch the machine tolerances and warping of materials.
I'm not sure what 3d programs come with the printer, but I've used free3d modeling software before and it's crap compared to the $1000k+ programs if you want any real contour to your models.

So size, material, and simplicity are your limiting factors.

I've designed a binding around my 9.5 Burton Ion boot using SolidWorks. If I were to make it with a makerbot replicator 2, I would need the thermal bed so that the ABS wouldn't be able to cool and warp too much. Many people complain about the need to constantly recalibrate them and each baseplate print would cost about 1 spool (2.2lb spool $30).

I haven't looked into the Airwolf Airwolf 3D Unveils AW3D HDx 3D Printer For Polycarbonate and Nylon Printing - 3DPrint.com or other polycarbonate capable printers enough to know how accurately they can print, but the cost of the printer (3500+) and material (5lb spool $188) makes it harder to justify.

If it's a from scratch part, you can always make it thicker for strength. But if you're trying to replicate a part, you need to carefully look at size and materials.
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Old 08-06-2014, 01:11 PM   #5 (permalink)
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Then again I'd once again have the back to all my remotes. So for a $1000+ there's that....
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Old 08-06-2014, 01:15 PM   #6 (permalink)
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Woops $1000 not $1000k. didn't edit
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Old 08-06-2014, 01:18 PM   #7 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike E View Post
Woops $1000 not $1000k. didn't edit
Back in the mid 90s when we were doing SLA 3d models you were perfectly fine originally.
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Old 08-06-2014, 01:19 PM   #8 (permalink)
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Yeah, I've heard. Some programs are still $25k+ per liscense in an office.
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Old 08-06-2014, 02:09 PM   #9 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike E View Post
The biggest issue is the size constraints of each printer. You would need a minimum print volume ~10"x6"x4" to make a reliable binding baseplate.

2nd would be material for specific parts being replicated.
ABS - medium impact resistance, medium heat resistance, medium print difficulty
PLA - low impact resistance worse heat resistance, easy print difficulty
PC (polycarbonate) - Better all around, harder to get a good 3d print (requires alot of temperature monitoring)

Not sure if the makerbots are capable of using polycarbonate. If you are trying to replicate a boot plastic clip or BOA ratchet ABS would be good just make sure it's thicker than the original for safety. Binding pieces will all vary for strength, impact resistance, and heat resistance requirements. If you're trying to make a new heel cup or high back then you need to match to the existing sizes and watch the machine tolerances and warping of materials.
I'm not sure what 3d programs come with the printer, but I've used free3d modeling software before and it's crap compared to the $1000k+ programs if you want any real contour to your models.

So size, material, and simplicity are your limiting factors.

I've designed a binding around my 9.5 Burton Ion boot using SolidWorks. If I were to make it with a makerbot replicator 2, I would need the thermal bed so that the ABS wouldn't be able to cool and warp too much. Many people complain about the need to constantly recalibrate them and each baseplate print would cost about 1 spool (2.2lb spool $30).

I haven't looked into the Airwolf Airwolf 3D Unveils AW3D HDx 3D Printer For Polycarbonate and Nylon Printing - 3DPrint.com or other polycarbonate capable printers enough to know how accurately they can print, but the cost of the printer (3500+) and material (5lb spool $188) makes it harder to justify.

If it's a from scratch part, you can always make it thicker for strength. But if you're trying to replicate a part, you need to carefully look at size and materials.
The 3D Printing market is still evolving. In the past few years the 3d printing company's have made a bunch of advancements.

As for printing bindings, I think that could be possable with in the next 2 years. The only thing that is holding that back would be the material. 3D Printers, 3D Printing, 3D Parts and Rapid Prototyping | www.3dsystems.com Started printing shoes, so being able to do other stuff is not far off.

There's already are printers for the home starting at $999. The software is becoming more and more user friendly. For instance look how google sketch up took off.

As for part replication the 3D printing company's have come out with scanners that would allow one to make and exact replica of a part. In addition to the scanners, there are other software that is on the market to do testing/stress analysis.

I think the 3d Printers would be good for a DIY guy that like to make proto types and test diffrent stuff out.
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Old 08-06-2014, 11:03 PM   #10 (permalink)
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3D printing takes too long and isn't economical. We printed some components for our robot using ABS, they were wheel hub supports and hubs. Even when printed at 50% density (it has a honeycomb structure, the density controls how big the honeycomb is in our slicer software) and a fairly decent shell thickness, it easily cracked with an impact load.
It's great for rapid prototyping.
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