Why don't pro snowboarders ever wear helmets in movies? - Page 3 - Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums
SnowboardingForum.com is the premier Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-17-2012, 02:00 PM   #21 (permalink)
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
SnowRock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: NW NJ via NYC
Posts: 208
Default

Somewhat relevant to this discussion, just saw this in today's Wall Street Journal
Quote:
Originally Posted by WSJ
Where Snowboard Injuries Are

An analysis of snowboarding accidents published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine found significant differences in the location and severity of head injuries in beginners compared with experienced snowboarders.

Experienced snowboarders were more likely to have frontal-region injuries.

The study used data on 2,367 snowboarders, including 959 beginners and 1,408 experienced intermediates or experts, injured in northern Japan from 1999 to 2008. The average age was 24.

Falls accounted for 71% of beginner injuries. Among experienced snowboarders, falls and collisions accounted for 44% and 32%, respectively. Both groups suffered injuries most often in the occipital region at the back of the head. Experienced snowboarders were more likely to have frontal-region injuries.

Researchers said experienced snowboarders had more collisions with trees and other snowboarders and skiers. They also had more facial bone and head fractures than beginners.

Less than 2% of the beginners and 9% of the experienced snowboarders wore helmets. But this had little effect on severe intracranial injuries, which affected 3% of helmeted snowboarders and 2% of those without helmets. Helmets lead to more risk-taking and may not provide effective head protection, the report said.

Caveat: Beginner and experienced snowboarders weren't clearly defined.
What I think is interesting is in bold.. basically, if you are going to really f up your head, the helmet isn't going to save you. I do think for more minor falls/accidents they do their job well, but they have their limits.

I bought a helmet last year (first year back on the snow in 5), and wear it most of the time. Its comfortable and warm and I see no reason not to... though yesterday for some reason I didn't throw it on.
SnowRock is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-17-2012, 02:20 PM   #22 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
GreatScott's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Los Angeles
Posts: 223
Default

I ride with a helmet to protect me from cracking my skull on jibs, trees and noobs. Thinking that a helmet is going to keep your brain from smashing up into the front of your skull is dumb. A helmet is not going to save you from a concussion.
GreatScott is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 02:27 PM   #23 (permalink)
Leo
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
Leo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Detroit Area
Posts: 6,230
Default

I'd also like to see complimentary statistics on how educated those with helmeted injuries were on the proper usage and limitations of said helmets.

Also, it's talking about severe head injuries.

Furthermore, it states that less than 2% of beginners wore helmets and less than 9, again, 9% of EXPERIENCED riders wore them. The statistic itself said that experienced riders had more head injuries. Significantly more experienced riders wore helmets than beginners. So of course, you're going to see more severe helmeted injuries when most of the helmeted riders were experienced who obviously take more risks. By the way, do the math on that. 8% of 1408 vs 1% of 959. Huge difference. We're talking around 113 experienced riders wearing helmets in this sample vs around 10 beginners wearing them.

This is why statistics can be very misleading. You have to think about the numbers critically. This study is inconclusive and the author should be ashamed of himself.
__________________
www.aGNARchy.com Reviews and David Z's rants
Leo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 02:29 PM   #24 (permalink)
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 227
Default

i actually got a concussion last year (had to be woken up by ski patrol on the trail), and a lot of friends say how i was so fortunate that i wore my helmet. but i always wondered, if i didn't have it on, would i have done what i did to put me in a situation that led to the concussion? i mean, studies have definitely shown that additional safety measures are correlated with riskier behaviors that at least partially offset them. one of life's catch-22s.

i still wear my helmet because even if the safety is offset, the additional risk-taking helps me progress. plus, i bought a higher-end helmet that weights next to nothing and is very warm on my head.
onefutui2e is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 02:30 PM   #25 (permalink)
With extra cheese.
 
CheeseForSteeze's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 1,750
Default

I think I've hit my head twice in my snowboarding "history", once with and once without. Both times felt equally painful but left me with less than even a grade I concussion. However, I've hurt my shoulders, ribs, hips, shins, forearms more times than I can count. Even on rails, I've never even come close to hitting my head, it's always something else that hits.

The pros probably just don't wear it out of habit. Helmets aren't considerably irritating, uncomfortable, expensive, heavy or whatever else, so I have to imagine this is out of habit. Seb Toots wore a helmet in his part in Black Winter, I have to wonder if someone required him to wear one or if he just chooses to.
CheeseForSteeze is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 02:32 PM   #26 (permalink)
Leo
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
Leo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Detroit Area
Posts: 6,230
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by onefutui2e View Post
i actually got a concussion last year (had to be woken up by ski patrol on the trail), and a lot of friends say how i was so fortunate that i wore my helmet. but i always wondered, if i didn't have it on, would i have done what i did to put me in a situation that led to the concussion? i mean, studies have definitely shown that additional safety measures are correlated with riskier behaviors that at least partially offset them. one of life's catch-22s.

i still wear my helmet because even if the safety is offset, the additional risk-taking helps me progress. plus, i bought a higher-end helmet that weights next to nothing and is very warm on my head.
No study has done such thing. It's a hypothesis and practically impossible to determine. I debunked the statistic that was shown above. Most statistics in articles are like this.

While I think it's very possible for someone to take more risks thinking they are safe-guarded, I think that's a rare occurrence given that the person was properly educated on the limitations of protection.
__________________
www.aGNARchy.com Reviews and David Z's rants
Leo is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 03:02 PM   #27 (permalink)
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
SnowRock's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: NW NJ via NYC
Posts: 208
Default

I'm confused.. what exactly are you debunking? ...here is the abstract which has some of additional stats, but not all of those referenced in the write-up. Differences in Clinical Characteristics of Head Injuries to Snowboarders by Skill Level

What I said I found interesting was that many of the "anti-helmet" crowd argue that helmets (as a reuslt of their tech limitations) do little to actually protect you when you are going to experience one of those severe injuries and this study seems to bear that out no? Basically this argument:

The Problem with Snowsports Helmets - The Backcountry Skiing Blog

Now I see no downside to wearing one so I choose to.. knowing full well that its not a magic shroud.
SnowRock is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 03:10 PM   #28 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
PeaceMaker's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Lyon, France
Posts: 16
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cr0_Reps_Smit View Post
your knees are, in my opinion, the most important thing you use while snowboarding. you blow out your knee and youre not going to be riding for awhile. plus its gonna make a lot of other things in your daily life a bit more difficult.
Of course. You're right saying that. But you can't deny that head/spinal injuries are less serious injuries than broken knees. I prefer having a daily life more difficult because of broken knees that no life at all... or being paralyzed for all my life.

But you made a point all of you guys in saying that the most important is to wear protection but without taking more considerable risks, which definitely offsets the protection.

So... Keep it SAFE and Enjoy the Ride !!
__________________
French rider - freestyle/freeride (spot: the Alps)
If you see a mistake in my English, please let me know in your reply, or give me notice by MP. It'd be nice!

Board: LibTech Skate Banana 145
Bindings: Burton Malavita M/L
Boots: Nitro team TLS
PeaceMaker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 03:49 PM   #29 (permalink)
Veteran Member
 
grafta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Vancouver, BC
Posts: 1,752
Default

That's a good read
grafta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-17-2012, 04:05 PM   #30 (permalink)
Leo
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
Leo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2009
Location: Detroit Area
Posts: 6,230
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by SnowRock View Post
I'm confused.. what exactly are you debunking? ...here is the abstract which has some of additional stats, but not all of those referenced in the write-up. Differences in Clinical Characteristics of Head Injuries to Snowboarders by Skill Level

What I said I found interesting was that many of the "anti-helmet" crowd argue that helmets (as a reuslt of their tech limitations) do little to actually protect you when you are going to experience one of those severe injuries and this study seems to bear that out no? Basically this argument:

The Problem with Snowsports Helmets - The Backcountry Skiing Blog

Now I see no downside to wearing one so I choose to.. knowing full well that its not a magic shroud.
You know what? I messed up my logic with the math. Sorry, I retract the math aspect of it.

My other points are still valid. There is more that needs to be known about this study in order to jump to that conclusion. Educated on helmet limitations vs uneducated makes a difference. A more clear picture needs to be painted about the skill levels and type of riding that is being done here.
__________________
www.aGNARchy.com Reviews and David Z's rants
Leo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:48 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums