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post #1 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 06:08 PM
goodtry
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Staying on edge

I went boarding yesterday and relized even on flat parts when i was trying to gain speed i couldnt just have the flat bottom of the board on the snow, it kept feeling like i was going to catch an edge. I had to stay either on heel edge or toe edge, is this normal or are you suppose to be able to go flat.
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post #2 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 07:23 PM
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Totally normal and exactly for the reason you state. Being even a tiny bit on edge will allow the board to stabilize and feel locked on. The "catch an edge" feeling you have when the board is running flat is the side cut of either edge trying to engage. Better to pick one and stick with it than have one suddenly grab when you are running flat.

The only time your board should be flat is if you are on a rail or box, on the top of a pipe wall, or lip of a jump. The rest of the time flat should only occur for a millisecond between turns, and even then the board isn't truly flat if you are steering with the front foot.
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post #3 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 07:26 PM
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It's normal. I've found I can leave the board closer to flat-based as I get more practice, but it almost always takes a little edge.

I've read some of the more experienced guys on this site suggest twisting the board so you use the toe edge at one end of the board while using the heel edge at the other end. Personally I haven't got that to work yet.
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post #4 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 07:34 PM
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Originally Posted by alf View Post
I've read some of the more experienced guys on this site suggest twisting the board so you use the toe edge at one end of the board while using the heel edge at the other end. Personally I haven't got that to work yet.
Remember that only happens for a split second at turn initiation, you wouldn't try and let the board run like that for any distance.
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post #5 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 07:40 PM
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Remember that only happens for a split second at turn initation, you would'nt try and let the board run like that for any distance.
Nah, this was in context of trying to keep up momentum for long flat stretches, not for torsional steering. I'm thinking, whether it works at all might depend on how flexible your gear is... But agreed that the real answer to the OP's question is that you expect to stay on edge for flats!
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post #6 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 07:45 PM
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Nah, this was in context of trying to keep up momentum for long flat stretches, not for torsional steering.
How is that supposed to work? Can you point me to the thread? If you are on toe edge in front and heel edge in back and trying to run the flats it seems that you would be killing your speed rather than gaining it. It also seems like it would force you into a turn.
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post #7 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 07:53 PM
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Nope, riding on both edges is perfectly normal.

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post #8 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 07:59 PM
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I've found that the best way to stay stable on the flats while maintaining speed and staving off leg fatigue is to stay locked into a fairly high edge angle carve. If you stay on one edge and let it shift your body across the trail you are actually losing a lot more speed to friction and wearing out your legs. Instead, keep a nice small radius carve back and forth. You should not be staying on one edge long enough to change direction. Just let the board pass back and forth beneath your torso and you'll be much more stable. Not to mention it feels better and your legs will thank you.


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post #9 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 08:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Grizz View Post
How is that supposed to work? Can you point me to the thread? If you are on toe edge in front and heel edge in back and trying to run the flats it seems that you would be killing your speed rather than gaining it. It also seems like it would force you into a turn.
Can't believe I actually found it (or one of them)
http://www.snowboardingforum.com/tip...html#post30599

The idea would be to have less angle on either edge than you'd have if you were riding on one (so it doesn't slow you down too much), and the two edges cancel eachother out as far as turning, I guess.

Or for a more practical alternative:
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post #10 of 100 (permalink) Old 01-06-2009, 08:10 PM
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Can't believe I actually found it (or one of them)
http://www.snowboardingforum.com/tip...html#post30599

The idea would be to have less angle on either edge than you'd have if you were riding on one (so it doesn't slow you down too much), and the two edges cancel eachother out as far as turning, I guess.

Or for a more practical alternative:
Thanks for digging that up. I'll check it out.

Ok, still not buying it. I'll try it tomorrow. Even if it's possible (??) I don't see what is to be gained over using all of one edge vs 1/2 of one and 1/2 of the other.

That think looks like a bitch to ollie.

Last edited by Grizz; 01-06-2009 at 08:40 PM. Reason: Checked out the other thread
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