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Old 12-31-2013, 07:00 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default hard carving, progressing from intermediate to advanced?

hi guys, I'm trying to get better at riding. I've been snowboarding for a few years now but this season I have really been trying to improve a lot more. I'm riding 3-5 times a week.

So what I'm having problems with the most is high speed, hard aggressive carving. When I'm riding blues I can lay down neat clean carves. I don't have problems with transitioning. But when I really pick up the pace on blacks I have two main problems.

1) When I'm locked into my toeside carve, sometimes the edge on the front of my board will "pop" out. Last weekend I lost an edge like this on groomer and crashed doing 70 or 80, it sucked. What can I do to keep my edges locked in? I'm trying to weight my front foot more, I usually initiate my turns with my back foot and most of the time my weight is like 30/70 front/back. I'm not sure if this is right? I'm also trying to make sure the start of the carve is clean and locked in before I really lay into it.

2) A similar thing happens with my heel edge, but only on steeps where I am hard on my edge. Perpendicular with the fall line. It will start "walking" out in steps and then slip out completely. I feel my back heel start to "pop pop pop" and the edge grabbing/letting go repeatedly. I can really lay into my heel side a lot harder than my toe side, is this just the limit of traction of the board?

Basically are there any good videos to show how I can put my edges in harder and have them grip? My board is a Rossi krypto with MTX edges, so it should be biting quite hard. Most of the videos and how-tos I see are more for beginners, but I'm hitting a plateau and I want to move into being able to freeride and charge harder.
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:47 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Get someone to follow you and record your run. Or get a monopole and do it yourself. You'll learn a lot from watching what you're actually doing. For instance, I bet you aren't edging nearly as hard as you think you are, and I also suspect you are edging less on toeside than on heelside.

As for weighting, normally on a carve you start out weighted forward but you shift your weight back over the course of the carve. If you're keeping your weighting static, you're probably not as efficient over the whole carve as you'd like to be.
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:49 PM   #3 (permalink)
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Welcome to the forum!

You're pretty much where I'm at right now. 3rd season in, going just as much, and really focusing on advanced carving.

There's a few threads open that might help you out. Since you asked for a video, here's a good one that was posted in a previous thread.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9n_cwQLpo_c

I have the same problem on the double blacks over here in that my transitions are a bit sloppy at times. Honestly, that's more to do with the fact I just need to grow a pair and be more aggressive transitioning my weight forward at turn initiation. You say you initiate with your back foot. That's a big no-no for carving, unless you mean something else. That's referred as "ruddering". Always transition your weight, like you said, to your front foot to initiate the turn.

The thing is, I have a forward stance, so I can get away a bit of knee and ankle roll on my leading foot instead of having to jump forward as much as when I went duck. I also found my angulation a bit better when I went forward, but many experienced riders here carve fast duck, so it doesn't really matter as long as you got the technique down.

As far as heel side, I wish I could tell you. I'm still having a hard time locking it down with great consistency. It's not just how hard you lay down on it, it's your weight distribution depending on where you are at the turn. Same thing as in toeside, but I can't seem to get the mechanics down pat for heelside. I was going to start another thread to address this issue, but I'll just follow this one to see what others have to say.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:16 PM   #4 (permalink)
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higher speed and fast turning requires smooth direction change. you cant just stick the board up and expect it bites the snow and turn at high speed. just imagine suddenly turning your steering wheel at high speed, the car will just keep going forward.
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Old 12-31-2013, 08:41 PM   #5 (permalink)
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I'd imagine its part board, part weighting or shifting your weight in the carve and technique. A board will only hold so much g...so yes smooth shifting/transitioning and also learning to unweight and pop to the next edge. You also ime...as you advance you learn to keep the nose in the fall line and not so much traversing (releasing the carve earlier and go to the next edge) or more flowing the fall line...except for maybe layout eurocarves...which I don't do.
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Old 12-31-2013, 09:18 PM   #6 (permalink)
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It is very hard to tell without a video. Generally issues with the front or rear of the board is a lack of proper pressure or not properly stacking you body over the board.

The fact that you are initiating a carve with your back leg leads me to believe you are not doing it correctly and may not be carving at all. You generally initiate a carve with the front foot by rolling the knee followed by pressing your shins into the boot and pushing your hips forward. The rear of the board should then follow the front exactly.

On intermediate runs (Blue) are you leaving a nice pencil line all the way through your turn? both heel and toe turns. Or is it wider during the last half?

EDIT: Mel M's video is a decent explanation. However, it doesn't talk about the stacking your weight over the board enough.

Last edited by aiidoneus; 12-31-2013 at 09:21 PM.
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Old 01-01-2014, 04:41 AM   #7 (permalink)
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Yeah, depending on how fast you're going, the board can become the bottleneck. What weight are you, and what length board are you riding?
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Old 01-01-2014, 01:30 PM   #8 (permalink)
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thanks for all the advice, i never thought about videoing myself. The youtube video really helps though.

I used to ride a really torsionally flexible short board so I developed this habit of initiating the turn with the back foot which I think is what I'm doing wrong. With my last board that would twist the whole board and let it bite really well. I'm not ruddering or lifting the back foot at all, but I start the lean with my back leg if that makes any sense. I ride 15 deg and 0 in the rear, and to get on an edge I either push my back shin forward or lean it back into the highback. Most of my weight is over the rear all the time so there is no lifting. It's a clean line throughout and I'm sure I'm carving, but I have to start the carve slow. I can tell by the sound the board is making.

I'm 165lb and I'm riding a 159cm this year.

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Old 01-01-2014, 03:11 PM   #9 (permalink)
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You need to take a lesson. Sounds like you have some bad habits there. If you've got the $$ to spare, a private lesson is well worth the bucks. The hard part is leaving your ego at the door and accepting the critique without getting defensive.
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:41 PM   #10 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
You need to take a lesson. Sounds like you have some bad habits there. If you've got the $$ to spare, a private lesson is well worth the bucks. The hard part is leaving your ego at the door and accepting the critique without getting defensive.
I just did a 1hr private today, which turned into 1.5hrs and holy crap I thought I was ok at stacking my weight over my board.... turns out not so much. I am so close to laying down actual carves now and my toe side turns feel so much more powerful and in control. I am 100% for private lessons if $$ will allow it.
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