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post #11 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-07-2010, 02:32 AM Thread Starter
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You know, in retrospect the onslope attitude could be considered more of a life skill more than anything. I've had my share of dick moments in the distant past, including wigging out an a skier who cut across the racecourse in front of me during an old USASA Giant Slalom event. No one is immune to anger, but I hope people read this and think about if it helps anything at the time, it doesn't, maybe in high-speed bomber runs, but not in other aspects.

I guess what I try to remember is that we are all out there to have fun. Some people like to do it at the expense of others, which is their choice, but more often than not they are not the greatest riders themselves. Maybe it's because I've gotten older that I can handle the bad stuff now, dumb wrecks and whatnot. Last season after strapping in I was buttering around at the top of the resort and slipped out right onto my back. Flat. There's 2 ways to handle that. One is "what the fuck", the other is "hahahahahahaha". For those that are self conscious, you'll almost always get a much better reception from the people around you when you're cool about it.

As for the slams, you're right David, giving up is unacceptable in sport driven by self-progression. If it's not a nasty slam and you can get up right away, I've found the best thing is to go for it again. Even if it's a scary wreck, or something that could of gone a lot worse. I try to teach friends and other riders that going for it again is what gets you past the fear and self-consciousness. If you do a trick, crash and decide not to do it for awhile (as long as it's within a riders skill level), going for it again will reduce the what if thoughts from building up and clouding the progression.

As for the bad days Snowolf, yeah we all know they are coming. I agree that a brew or 2 can help immensely, but for some reason the more I drink the more I want to do rails rather than kickers or freeriding...

Anyways, I just prefer to ride with people will a positive attitude, which is usually the case around the resorts with the more adult crowd anyways. Who you ride with can and sometimes will wear off on you. One of the coolest things to hear someone say on the lift is when the snow or terrain isn't the greatest but they're just happy to be riding, stuff like that makes my day, and I'll usually keep in contact with them if I see them around the slopes.
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post #12 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-09-2010, 05:18 PM
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Lastly, I don`t know if this is true for many others, but my biggest problem is comparing myself to other riders on the hill. Here at Mt. Hood, we have some amazing riders who make everything look like a cake walk. I have a tendency to rate myself based on other riders and after a little bit of that, I think I really, really suck..... The reality is that I am a solid intermediate but more important than that is that my riding improves. I think it is important to not compare your riding to others but to yourself and where you were a year ago or more.
I definitely have this problem sometimes as well. Just have to come to grips with how well we ride and how well we're progressing not compared to some of the other people on the mountain. I used to ride with a friend who was just naturally talented on a snowboard. In fact he's the only person I've ever seen grab a board with no lessons and be able to shred the first time up. Riding with him could get super frustrating because i'd want to keep up with what he was doing but I was/am clearly not as naturally talented on a snowboard as he was/is. Overall though it's about keeping positive and just trying to improve.
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post #13 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-09-2010, 09:35 PM
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As for the slams, you're right David, giving up is unacceptable in sport driven by self-progression. If it's not a nasty slam and you can get up right away, I've found the best thing is to go for it again. Even if it's a scary wreck, or something that could of gone a lot worse. I try to teach friends and other riders that going for it again is what gets you past the fear and self-consciousness. If you do a trick, crash and decide not to do it for awhile (as long as it's within a riders skill level), going for it again will reduce the what if thoughts from building up and clouding the progression.
A while back someone around here had posted a youtube self edit, riding somewhere in PacNW (Crystal? Snoqualmie? don't remember) with a total n00b. So he's riding with his friend and in order to instill confidence, I guess, or to teach that "don't give up" lesson, he kept trying to do nollie to front flips on the flats. And he kept eating shit.

But eventually started landing them.

I wish I had bookmarked that video.

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post #14 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-09-2010, 09:39 PM
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My tip to beginners would be "no mind"

"no mind, you got too many minds" (from The Last Samurai).

I'll show them the technique, and let them explore on their own. I thought the way I learned how to link turns was different from other people. I learned by using my hips and kicking my back leg out to get over to my toe-side. To some other people, their toe-sides are natural and heel-sides are very difficult. I just keep reminding them that I used to be just like them if not worse. I think it's important to remind newbies that, they'll wake up sore for sure, exhausted, maybe even some bruises. Remind them that you used to be in the wet-and-miserable stage of leafing.

That, and stop dropping the soap (don't lean forward/bend over all the time). By reminding them that if they're going to fall, it's better to fall/sit down on the butts.
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post #15 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 12:29 AM Thread Starter
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I think it's important to remind newbies that, they'll wake up sore for sure, exhausted, maybe even some bruises. Remind them that you used to be in the wet-and-miserable stage of leafing.
Absolutely. I'm one of the few who's never taken a formal lesson, I caught on pretty quick, but I like to tell beginners watching more advanced riders that they'll get to that point but we were all a beginner at some time and not expect it to happen overnight. The biggest thing for me when I'm teaching someone to ride is patience and positive reinforcement. As a new rider, they might not know what they are doing right in the learning process or notice their own progression, they just know they aren't falling. I remember Louie Vito out here doing the halfpipe (USASA) comps when we was very young, he didn't even know how good he was doing trick-wise, lol.

It seems a lot of beginners are afraid to ask questions too, the majority of us are more than willing to help out a fellow rider with some tips via a chairlift conversation or taking the time to slow down and gain some snow-karma. It's important though for them to learn at their own pace, and not get talked into doing things. There's a difference between guts and ability, guts without ability will only get you hurt. For example, if your more of an advanced rider and you see a rail/box that looks like it might be sketchy, hit it before your newer rider does and check it out for them. Last season this happened with me and a good friend of mine who is newish to the park stuff. They just got done shaping the approach to a table and it looked like it was not lining up right. I hit it first, and damn near caught the nose of my board on the edge of it. I tried to wave off my friend from doing it...but it was too late, nose of the board went under the edge of the table...you know the rest.

David, wish we still had that video around, would love to see it!
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post #16 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 12:43 AM
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Tell me about it.. I was sore for 2 days..could barely walk when I took the hit on my tailbone.

November needs to hurry up and come
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post #17 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 10:34 AM
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I'm no noob, but nowhere near advanced either. Which means I tend to have more guts than ability, so I eat shit a lot And usually when I do, I act like I just stomped a gnarly trick. Always seems to get good responses and keeps the mood light for me
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post #18 of 19 (permalink) Old 08-10-2010, 05:14 PM
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Oh I haven't seen this being brought up yet, so I'll mention it...

Newbies, when you're getting off of the lift, GO STRAIGHT! I'm serious, most resorts have set up their landing pads so it's impossible for you to go fast right off of the lift. Even if you can't stop, you'll just slowly/gently carass the wall of snow ahead of you. If it's an open area (like the top of Northstar), your board will eventually lose momentum, or you'll just cruise into a crowd of warm-blooded, soft bodied humans. Just GO STRAIGHT!

I know this is messed up, but I'm scared to get on the lift with newbies, it's not like all of them announce they're newbies, but the next thing you know, they try to take out your ankles with their boards.
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