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post #1 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
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Forward or Duck?

I had my bindings set on my board today while I was out trying on boots, and he set me at +18/-6, which is of course duck, though pretty mild. I don't think I've ever ridden duck (I've only used rentals til now and I've never actually checked), but my guess is that most mountains set up their rentals as forward.

I am a beginner, just getting comfortable with linking turns. I mostly free-ride, but am not opposed to hitting some features when I get more comfortable. I'm on a 155 Evo-R, so I'm thinking the duck would be nice since it's a true twin.. but I'm not sure. Felt a little weird to step into just in my room (but I was not wearing boots.. so, take it as you will).

Will it be significantly different in turns and such? I don't want to have to re-learn everything I've learned to far. Or is it maybe just the completely wrong stance? Like I said, not sure what they use at my home mountain for rentals.
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post #2 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 04:25 PM
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forward stance is for skiers

THERE ARE SPECIFIC REASONS AS TO WHY I AM MORE LOCAL THAN YOU


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post #3 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 04:31 PM
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Just go out and ride, if you want to eventually do some park you'll want the duck stance. If you think all you're going to do is freeride then go back to forward, either way changing you stance isn't going to make you have to learn all over again, it'll just feel a little awkward and eventually you'll get use to it... if not change around the angles of the duck stance till you find what you like.
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post #4 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 04:42 PM
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For me forward feels completely awkward and unatural. I've played sports my whole life so a natural athletic stance is what feels most comfortable to me. I've varied from 15, 0 to 18, -9, which is what I currently ride. When riding with duck angles you need to make sure you have a proper stance because your back knee can take a beating if you don't. I see people riding around with duck angles but have their back knee pointing downhill
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post #5 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 06:00 PM Thread Starter
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Will it be harder for me to learn to progress in Duck? Or is it strictly a comfort thing?
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post #6 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 07:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
Mostly a comfort thing. Now, learning to ride switch will be a lot easier with a duck stance. From a "learning to ride" perspective, I favor setting my students duck right from the start. A large part of this logic is about 50% have no idea whether they are regular or goofy, so an even duck setting around 9 and -9 is right in the middle of the bell curve for most people.

Another reason, I like setting students up evenly duck is tends to be conducive for proper ankle and knee flexion. The rider starts developing good riding posture right from the start. A forward stance can create some weird lower body postures that are hard to break as the riders moves into an intermediate level.
I always thought that the stance is dictated by the type of riding, and board (directional or twin). You are saying that duck is a better and more correct posture than forward, in general or that is more practical for your classes and/or the learning periond? I never tried duck because I don't do park. I'll try this season and see how it feel.
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post #7 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-16-2010, 08:18 PM
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I think duck is a more "natural" posture because like it's been stated, it's basically the way you normally stand, (with both feet facing outward). Riding with a forward stand gives you more of a lean which gives you more torque/force in your turns, but if you really think about it its a pretty unnatural way to have your feet setup. How often do you have your back knee bent forwards on a day-to-day basis?

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post #8 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-17-2010, 12:04 AM
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I normally set up my beginner students to be 15 on the front foot and 0 on the back. If you are just a beginner , 90% of the time, you are going to be going one way. When you go to intermediate to advanced riding, you will be wanting to sink down and towards the tail of the board when you are finishing your turns. Its kind of un-natural and harder to sink down on the backfoot when your knee is pointing towards the tail of the board.

Just do a simple experiment, lay your board flat on the ground and stand on the board as if you have your both your bindings at 0 degrees. Now bend both knees the same evenly, Your butt should be in the middle of the board.
Now turn both your feet say 45 degrees forward (just to exagerate) and now bend both knees evenly, your butt should be moving towards the tail of the board. which is where you want your to be moving your weight during at at the end of your turn.

Also if you have a massive duck stance, draw a line along the binding angle toe edge to the heel edge. Compare the distance between the 2 feet on the toe side to the distance between the lines on the heel side.

When are you are flexing, naturally on the toeside you are pressuring the outsides of the board which is what you want to be generally doing when turning. On the heelside, if you have a big duck stance, you will be pressuring the middle of the board which is not what you want to be doing at the beginning or the end of your turns.

Hope this helps a little bit! I'm not against a duck stance as I ride a little duck myself, but if you are just into free riding and going in one direction, the forward stance will be working better for you especially on the heelside which if you ask any intermediate/advanced rider is the harder of the 2 turns.

There is a reason why racers have a forward stance
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post #9 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-17-2010, 12:27 AM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by SiKBOY View Post

Hope this helps a little bit! I'm not against a duck stance as I ride a little duck myself, but if you are just into free riding and going in one direction, the forward stance will be working better for you especially on the heelside which if you ask any intermediate/advanced rider is the harder of the 2 turns.

There is a reason why racers have a forward stance
I have no problem with heelside turns.. big problem with toeside though.
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post #10 of 15 (permalink) Old 10-17-2010, 12:33 AM
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I have no problem with heelside turns.. big problem with toeside though.
yeh, thats normal when you first start out. Depending on your ability, and a few lessons, you should be able to dial in your basic toe turn pretty quickly. Normally in my group lessons, most of the students are linking basic turns on a mellow slope by the end of their 2nd 2hr lesson.

What problems are you having with your toe turn?

Last edited by SiKBOY; 10-17-2010 at 12:37 AM.
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