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Old 12-27-2010, 01:26 PM   #1 (permalink)
dbx
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Question Need help

It's probably my first legit season at mountain high.
I get very discouraged easily , and ive been trying to carve for the past 2 times ive went, and i kept beefing.
besides to carve, but to do a 180 toeside turn and stop. if i get that down i can carve.
But i cant do any, and it was pissing me off. It was a point where I wanted to finish off for the whole season.
My friend can do jumps and grind on rails etc. He's been pushing me trying to help me carve and I get real pissed. Not that he's pushing me but because I can't get it to work. Im probably going again tomorrow, and heres the thing about this 180 toeside turn stop: I can swing my back leg, but i beef after that. I dont know what to do, do i put pressure on the front leg? i mean im just lost.

If there's anything you guys can give me tips on it would be great.
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Old 12-27-2010, 02:36 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Another case of why friends shouldn't teach friends. Do yourself a favor and take a lesson. Read below, as written by Snowolf....it will help you get your turns down. By the way carving is a style of turn not turning in general. It means that your nose and tail of the board follow the same path in the snow leaving a thin or trenched line. A basic skidded s-turn is probably what you are trying to do. the below will most likely help you.
Learning to turn

Written by: Snowolf

The heelside turn
Now for the turning thing.....On your toe edge, slow yourself down almost to a complete stall before starting the turn. With just your front foot, begin relaxing that toe pressure so the nose of the board begins to slide downhill toward the fall line. Shift your weight a tad toward your front foot and bend your knees a bit more than when traversing. Also, shift your front shoulder over the heel edge of the board. As the board rotates down the hill, begin to relax the toe pressure you were holding on the rear foot. The idea here is to have the board riding totally flat for a moment at the point it is gliding straight down the hill. Gradually increase the heel pressure on the front foot to get the heel edge to bite into the snow and start the turn. Once the turn is established and you are about halfway into the turn, follow through with the rear foot to bring the board up on it`s heel edge to carve the remainder of your turn. This is a timing thing and most people in the beginning tend to rock onto the heel edge too soon when the board is pointed down the fall line. Give yourself a count of 2 then come in with the rear foot.

To avoid overturning up the hill, a few degrees before you are across the fall line, ease up on that heel pressure on the front foot and the board will travel in a straight line across the hill.

Remember....DONT LEAN BACK! when pointed straight down the hill and accelerating. This "speed anxiety" will totally screw you because if you have no weight on the front of your board, it is never going to turn for you. Additionally, you can squat down a little in the turn to counteract the centrifugal forces that want to pull you to the outside of the turn. Also, it is important to look where you want to go. Sounds kinda funny, but really, your body will generally go where you are looking so turn your head and look over your lead should as you begin the heelside turn.

The toeside turn
Anyway, my advice is to go back to basics for a few runs. Get up toeside and learn to sideslip toeside then do the falling leaf thing and then some J turns to a stop then do Garlands. Stay on your toe edge the entire time when doing this. You might have to do this in sessions as people who are just beginning to do toeside work will get tired very quickly from their calf muscles burning. You don`t use these muscles like this in everyday life or other sports like you do in snowboarding. Conditioning makes this easier and you will be able to ride longer toeside with practice. Just remember that when you are on that toe edge, not to relax and let you`re heels drop and catch the edge causing a slam. When you start getting tired, take a break!

Now for the turning thing.....On your heel edge, slow yourself down almost to a complete stall before starting the turn. With just your front foot, begin relaxing that heel pressure so the nose of the board begins to slide downhill toward the fall line. Shift your weight a tad toward your front foot and bend your knees a bit more than when traversing. Also, shift your front shoulder over the toe edge of the board. As the board rotates down the hill, begin to relax the heel pressure you were holding on the rear foot. The idea here is to have the board riding totally flat for a moment at the point it is gliding straight down the hill. Gradually increase the toe pressure on the front foot to get the toe edge to bite into the snow and start the turn. Once the turn is established and you are about halfway into the turn, follow through with the rear foot to bring the board up on it`s toe edge to carve the remainder of your turn. This is a timing thing and most people in the beginning tend to rock onto the toe edge too soon when the board is pointed down the fall line. Give yourself a count of 2 then come in with the rear foot.

To avoid overturning up the hill, a few degrees before you are across the fall line, ease up on that toe pressure on the front foot and the board will travel in a straight line across the hill.

Remember....DONT LEAN BACK! when pointed straight down the hill and accelerating. This "speed anxiety" will totally screw you because if you have no weight on the front of your board, it is never going to turn for you.
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Old 12-27-2010, 03:12 PM   #3 (permalink)
dbx
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gjsnowboarder View Post
Another case of why friends shouldn't teach friends. Do yourself a favor and take a lesson. Read below, as written by Snowolf....it will help you get your turns down. By the way carving is a style of turn not turning in general. It means that your nose and tail of the board follow the same path in the snow leaving a thin or trenched line. A basic skidded s-turn is probably what you are trying to do. the below will most likely help you.
Learning to turn

Written by: Snowolf

The heelside turn
Now for the turning thing.....On your toe edge, slow yourself down almost to a complete stall before starting the turn. With just your front foot, begin relaxing that toe pressure so the nose of the board begins to slide downhill toward the fall line. Shift your weight a tad toward your front foot and bend your knees a bit more than when traversing. Also, shift your front shoulder over the heel edge of the board. As the board rotates down the hill, begin to relax the toe pressure you were holding on the rear foot. The idea here is to have the board riding totally flat for a moment at the point it is gliding straight down the hill. Gradually increase the heel pressure on the front foot to get the heel edge to bite into the snow and start the turn. Once the turn is established and you are about halfway into the turn, follow through with the rear foot to bring the board up on it`s heel edge to carve the remainder of your turn. This is a timing thing and most people in the beginning tend to rock onto the heel edge too soon when the board is pointed down the fall line. Give yourself a count of 2 then come in with the rear foot.

To avoid overturning up the hill, a few degrees before you are across the fall line, ease up on that heel pressure on the front foot and the board will travel in a straight line across the hill.

Remember....DONT LEAN BACK! when pointed straight down the hill and accelerating. This "speed anxiety" will totally screw you because if you have no weight on the front of your board, it is never going to turn for you. Additionally, you can squat down a little in the turn to counteract the centrifugal forces that want to pull you to the outside of the turn. Also, it is important to look where you want to go. Sounds kinda funny, but really, your body will generally go where you are looking so turn your head and look over your lead should as you begin the heelside turn.

The toeside turn
Anyway, my advice is to go back to basics for a few runs. Get up toeside and learn to sideslip toeside then do the falling leaf thing and then some J turns to a stop then do Garlands. Stay on your toe edge the entire time when doing this. You might have to do this in sessions as people who are just beginning to do toeside work will get tired very quickly from their calf muscles burning. You don`t use these muscles like this in everyday life or other sports like you do in snowboarding. Conditioning makes this easier and you will be able to ride longer toeside with practice. Just remember that when you are on that toe edge, not to relax and let you`re heels drop and catch the edge causing a slam. When you start getting tired, take a break!

Now for the turning thing.....On your heel edge, slow yourself down almost to a complete stall before starting the turn. With just your front foot, begin relaxing that heel pressure so the nose of the board begins to slide downhill toward the fall line. Shift your weight a tad toward your front foot and bend your knees a bit more than when traversing. Also, shift your front shoulder over the toe edge of the board. As the board rotates down the hill, begin to relax the heel pressure you were holding on the rear foot. The idea here is to have the board riding totally flat for a moment at the point it is gliding straight down the hill. Gradually increase the toe pressure on the front foot to get the toe edge to bite into the snow and start the turn. Once the turn is established and you are about halfway into the turn, follow through with the rear foot to bring the board up on it`s toe edge to carve the remainder of your turn. This is a timing thing and most people in the beginning tend to rock onto the toe edge too soon when the board is pointed down the fall line. Give yourself a count of 2 then come in with the rear foot.

To avoid overturning up the hill, a few degrees before you are across the fall line, ease up on that toe pressure on the front foot and the board will travel in a straight line across the hill.

Remember....DONT LEAN BACK! when pointed straight down the hill and accelerating. This "speed anxiety" will totally screw you because if you have no weight on the front of your board, it is never going to turn for you.
Thank you!
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Old 12-27-2010, 03:15 PM   #4 (permalink)
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Keep in mind that the front foot initiates the turn. I always used to think it was the back, and it just didn't work.

Good luck and don't give up.
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