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Old 01-05-2011, 03:50 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default Terrain and Different Types of Turns

I've checked out some of Snowolf's videos on turns and i'm beginning to feel pretty confident with my dynamic skidded turns and carving.

However, I'm confused about when to use these different turning techniques. What type of terrain should I be doing dynamic skidded turns? What about carving? Thanks.
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Old 08-04-2011, 06:01 PM   #2 (permalink)
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There are alot of factors that play into when you might want to use a specific turn style. It also depends on the specific radius you want/ are comfortable with using. Here are some examples of what I ride with different turning styles.

Narrow chute/blue-black terrain: short radius dynamic skidded
Wide open and groomed: standard carved turn, varying radius/dynamics for fun.
Off piste: aggressive medium to short radius dynamic turns.
Bumps: very dynamic carved if possible, although that depends on aggressiveness and bump type(icy/soft/smooth) and it ties into radius; all depending on comfort level.

I got alot more examples if you want, just name a terrain and I'll tell you the best ways I feel there are to have fun on it.

Generally, carving can be done just about anywhere, on all terrain (Unless you are doing true short radius dynamic turns, I've found you can't truly carve those) and it is generally the most effecient and smooth type of turn that get you the most out of your board and for your energy.
Dynamics can be introduced to all types of turns on all types of terrain, since it simply means you introduce seperation of the upper and lower body where you are actively pushing the board out from under you to decamber it and utilize the full energy to rebound you into the next turn (on a standard camber board.)

It all comes down to comfort level and personal preference in most cases. Although terrain can definitely decide as well.



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Last edited by NateGC; 08-04-2011 at 07:09 PM.
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Old 08-05-2011, 03:34 PM   #3 (permalink)
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That is very true. I've unfortunately not had many chances to ride the rockers, but when I have, they are definitely great fun and you can shred up any terrain with them once you get the subtle differences locked in.
I feel like they can be a bit sketchier at higher speeds in the long radius, because the camber has a tendency to try to choose your turn radius, but it's just down to how confident and aggressive you are in your control at that point.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:48 PM   #4 (permalink)
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IMO, Carve your ass off and enjoy vaulting in thigh burning turn to turn unless conditions demand otherwise.
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Old 09-25-2011, 09:52 PM   #5 (permalink)
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What about narrow, bumpy trails that transition into choppy blacks? Or choppy/clumpy hardpack with a layer of messy not-so-fresh powder?

What's the best way the handle moguls?
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Old 09-26-2011, 12:34 PM   #6 (permalink)
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I agree with Snowolf. Aggressive dynamic skidded is a good bet, focusing on speed control.
For a higher skill level and a bit of mogul fun, I also enjoy leaper turns, basically picking up my board and leaping the edge to edge transition. It's a bit of a cheat move, but pop some air off the moguls and it's great fun.
The other option for speed control in the chutes is to aggressively carve with early edge engagement. If you are talking about blue-black chutes, you should definitley have enough of a pitch to work with, so basically all you do is give the board a good hard torsional flick with your leading heel (or toe) and engage your downhill edge before entering the fall line. This engages your edge before you start picking up speed, so as you extend into the belly of the turn, you're shaping the entire thing, rather then relying on the bottom of the turn for speed control. Again, this is more advanced and a VERY aggressive style of riding. But it makes bumps, crud, and narrow steeps pretty fun and it's a good thing to try out if you can. The key to success is to actively push the board away from you while engaging the downhill edge, otherwise you'll fall over backward. Which I've done plenty of times
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