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Old 01-13-2011, 10:09 PM   #1 (permalink)
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Default How to think of turns

I've seen and heard a few different methods of learning turns, i learned by pointing where i was looking and just turning my head, no lower body movement, and that worked fine. I recently checked the snowboardaddiction learn to ride video, and they explain it all in the knees. What do you do for your skidded turns?
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Old 01-17-2011, 08:58 PM   #2 (permalink)
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Thanks for the response Snowolf, I learned to get really nice turns in without using the upper body to initiate or control the turn, but on the blues and easy blacks I often end up doing sideslips at the end of each turn, I can traverse at the end of each one but i end up on flat base too long and lose control. Any tips?
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Old 01-25-2011, 01:39 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
The best way to practice this maneuver and be able to feel the difference is by doing slash turns. These are turns we use ti kick up a wall of snow to spray people. Most of us do this by going into a hard turn and at the end, pushing the tail out hard by extending our rear leg. This really creates a skid and throws snow out in an impressive wall. Now try doing this same maneuver but instead of pushing the tail out, shift your weight back and collapse your rear leg like you are going to sit on your rear binding. You will feel a big difference. You will slow down much more rapidly and it will be smoother without the chatter. You will also not throw up as much spray. On the steeps, this will allow you to regulate speed without as much skid and loss of edge control.
You probably don't take requests but if you ever feel like doing a video about this demonstrating it on steep terrain, that would be awesome!
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Old 01-25-2011, 04:37 AM   #4 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
Absolutely!

The key to cleaning up you riding and maintaining control as you progress to steeper terrain is to get more dynamic in your riding. The main ingredients to dynamic riding are flexion/extension movements, fore/aft movements, independent rotary movements and intensifying your edging movements.

The problem of control loss at the bottom of your turns on steeper terrain that you describe is very common and we all struggle with this as we push ourselves with increasingly more difficult terrain. The main culprit here is stiff legs. While all aspects of dynamic riding will improve you riding, let's talk about two fundamentals that will best address your specific issue.

Flexion/ extension:

The lower you can get to your board at turn entry the better. This gets your center of gravity low which is good but the main reason for doing this is to allow you to extend through the top half of your turn. This gradual extension greatly helps you set your edge and allows constant braking action at a point in the turn where you have the best control. At the apex of the turn as the board enters the fall line, you have the ability to hit the brakes and speed check by briskly extending and pushing the board out away from you. If you wait to hit the brakes until the bottom of turn, loss of edge control is the likely result. The reason is because it is at the bottom of a turn is when all forces come together to try to throw you to the outside of the turn and the edge simply cannot stay engaged. You have gravity, momentum and centrifugal force acting on you at this point and extending to apply the brakes just adds even more force at the worst possible point.

So, we know when to brake but often more needs to be done to retain control as we complete our turns. This where loose legs helps. As you reach the apex of the turn and hit the brakes, retract by slowly begining to flex lower and lower as you complete the turn. This reduces the forces that are trying to break your edge hold. In addition, rough snow and crud will throw you if you have stiff legs. By remaining flexed you have loose legs and can absorb any board chatter without loosing edge hold. Any time you feel that skidding " ka chunka chunka chunka " sensation as the board skids down the slope, it is the result of sudden and total loss of edge hold. The biggest culprit is usually riding extended with stiff legs. This is also why it happens far more on heelside too; we are naturally stiffer on our heels.

Fore/Aft Movements:

Weight distribution has a huge impact on your edging movements like torsional twist and tilt. This is the reason that so much emphasis is placed on getting new riders to lean on their front foot when initiating their turns. The more weight you place on the edge, the more responsive the board becomes and the more effective your edge pressuring becomes. On steep terrain, this becomes crucial.

Starting into a turn with a forward shift of your weight gets the edge set early and allows for a powerful and positive engagement of the sidecut for strong turn initiation. As the turn progresses, the most effective part of the sidecut moves along the length of the board. By slowly shifting your weight back, you place your weight over this area. This keeps your edge locked into the snow, giving you maximum traction and control through superior edge hold.

Finishing a turn on steep terrain in this aft position also allows for good speed control without any of the bad things that happen when you push the tail of the board away from you by extending. At the point in the turn where this the most force trying to break the edge free at the tail and throw it down the hill, this aft shift of your weight puts extra downward force to keep it locked into the snow.

The best way to practice this maneuver and be able to feel the difference is by doing slash turns. These are turns we use ti kick up a wall of snow to spray people. Most of us do this by going into a hard turn and at the end, pushing the tail out hard by extending our rear leg. This really creates a skid and throws snow out in an impressive wall. Now try doing this same maneuver but instead of pushing the tail out, shift your weight back and collapse your rear leg like you are going to sit on your rear binding. You will feel a big difference. You will slow down much more rapidly and it will be smoother without the chatter. You will also not throw up as much spray. On the steeps, this will allow you to regulate speed without as much skid and loss of edge control.
good info. you are so good to at explaining things.
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