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-   -   Whats next after linking turns on greens (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/tips-tricks-snowboard-coaching/45387-whats-next-after-linking-turns-greens.html)

ohhhnick 01-14-2012 01:24 AM

Whats next after linking turns on greens
 
Hello everyone, first post here looking to try and figure out what to work on next.

Some quick background: I'm 5'8 175 pounds. I ride a 2012 Burton Clash, Burton Ruler Boots, with Custom bindings (I didn't know what I was doing when I bought this stuff). I had previous to this season ridden maybe 5 times, but all I could do was the falling leaf. This season I started learning how to turn heal and toe side.
2 trips ago, the light switch went off and i could link turn on green runs easily. This last time I went, I got faster and smoother turns and I'm not sure, but I think I was getting pretty dynamic with them as well. All on green runs of course. (I hit the lift 28 times)

I tried a blue run, at Mountain High, but it was way too steep for me, I slide slipped half of it down before it got to the point I felt comfortable.

So questions are:
What do I practice next? Do I stay on the green runs and try getting more dynamic, and keep practicing, do I step up to the blue's and try and link turns there? Any other suggestions for practice.

Also have i outgrown my board already? should I upgrade, or should I wait till the end of season? I don't want to hold me back from turning on steeper terrain, I know its designed for beginner easiness, and reading reviews on it has me scared trying to go faster on blue runs.

Thanks for your help!

AIRider 01-14-2012 02:34 AM

green, blue, black, yellow, purple, white, doesn't mean shit. People think just because they can snowplow down a double black diamond that all of a sudden are expert riders. Stick to what you are comfortable, experience it all, and don't worry about the runs your friends are doing, and what they're bragging about.

Keep linking your turns, and get as much time as possible on your board, your confidence will go up, your experience level will improve, and keep learning, asking questions, and observing how others are doing it … again, don't obsess about run colours.

cjcameron11 01-14-2012 04:58 AM

^^^^Good advice, it was hard for me to stick to greens and mellow blues while my mates were hitting blacks etc but now i think i am better technically than some of those mates and fall less while going faster and hitting jumps. practice practice!

aiidoneus 01-14-2012 08:29 AM

33 Attachment(s)
Great advice, ride on the edge of your comfort zone. That way you progress, but develop good techniques. I saw a guy last night who could not even do skidded turns trying to do Ollie 180s on a decent blue, it looked retarded and painful.

ohhhnick 01-14-2012 08:06 PM

Thank you all so much for the replies. I'm going to spend another day on the longer green run working on getting dynamic narrow equal turns before stepping up to skidded turns on the blues.

On the second part of the question is, when will I have outgrown my current board? I read reviews online at Burton Clash Snowboard Review which states its good for the very basics of turning down, but won't help learn how to carve a turn. I also bought the board in a 151 (I think a 155 is more for my weight) so it would be easy to learn on.

I'm not saying the board is the reason why i can't progress, but does it make it more difficult? at what skill level should I get something that's better? Or should it be fine for the rest of this season?

I'm trying to go about 1 to 2 times a week, I expect at least another 12 trips this season.

Thank you all again, you guys are awesome.

C.B. 01-14-2012 08:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ohhhnick (Post 467105)

On the second part of the question is, when will I have outgrown my current board? I read reviews online at Burton Clash Snowboard Review which states its good for the very basics of turning down, but won't help learn how to carve a turn. I also bought the board in a 151 (I think a 155 is more for my weight) so it would be easy to learn on.

I'm not saying the board is the reason why i can't progress, but does it make it more difficult? at what skill level should I get something that's better? Or should it be fine for the rest of this season?

the shorter board will be easier until you start getting into steeper/faster terrain.

Solitaire 01-16-2012 04:38 PM

I have a quick related question as I attempt to begin learning dynamic skidded turns (and hopefully dynamic carved turns soon).

Are dynamic skidded terms essentially an extension of linking your turns tighter and tighter together, until you get to the point where you don't really traverse the hill at all, and just keep turning every time you are about to cross over the fall line? Further, does this mean that instead of slowing pressing down on your front foot, waiting for the board to turn, etc...you moreso "force" the board into place via springing legs up and down?

I watched snowolf's video and whenever I attempt to move the board quickly from toe to heelside or vice versa, I almost always catch an edge. Any advice or tips on this would be much appreciated.

Thanks!

firstx1017 01-16-2012 11:34 PM

Ohhhnick - my husband learned to snowboard at Mountain High - and it was not our favorite place. The green runs are so short by the time you get a few links in, you are at the bottom of the hill. Conquest is pretty steep for a blue run- so is that blue run that starts with a "W" - Wedge of something like that on the left side of the mountain. We quit going to Mountain High and now go to Snow Summit - they have a much longer green run - about a mile - which is a great long run for practicing on. When that gets busy the left side of the mountain blue runs are a great step up from the green Summit Run. Here is a video of me learning at Snow Summit last year. I really recommend Snow Summit over Mountain High if you can work it out.

vicki learning to snowboard at 50 - YouTube

ohhhnick 01-17-2012 11:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by firstx1017 (Post 468111)
Ohhhnick - my husband learned to snowboard at Mountain High - and it was not our favorite place. The green runs are so short by the time you get a few links in, you are at the bottom of the hill. Conquest is pretty steep for a blue run- so is that blue run that starts with a "W" - Wedge of something like that on the left side of the mountain. We quit going to Mountain High and now go to Snow Summit - they have a much longer green run - about a mile - which is a great long run for practicing on. When that gets busy the left side of the mountain blue runs are a great step up from the green Summit Run. Here is a video of me learning at Snow Summit last year. I really recommend Snow Summit over Mountain High if you can work it out.

vicki learning to snowboard at 50 - YouTube

Thanks!, I just looked at the trail map, and that is awesome! and nice progress in your video!

gjsnowboarder 01-18-2012 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ohhhnick (Post 467105)
Thank you all so much for the replies. I'm going to spend another day on the longer green run working on getting dynamic narrow equal turns before stepping up to skidded turns on the blues.

On the second part of the question is, when will I have outgrown my current board? I read reviews online at Burton Clash Snowboard Review which states its good for the very basics of turning down, but won't help learn how to carve a turn. I also bought the board in a 151 (I think a 155 is more for my weight) so it would be easy to learn on.

I'm not saying the board is the reason why i can't progress, but does it make it more difficult? at what skill level should I get something that's better? Or should it be fine for the rest of this season?

I'm trying to go about 1 to 2 times a week, I expect at least another 12 trips this season.

Thank you all again, you guys are awesome.

Don't worry about buying a new board at this stage. Wait until you discover what type of boarding and terrain you want to do and then target a deck made for it. The Clash will do fine for carving at your level of riding. Initially carving is more about the rider's technique and less about the equipment.

To get better faster once you have reached level 4 status i.e. connecting turns. Consider taking a private lesson or half day group lesson to give you something new to work on and a person to watch your technique to help prevent habits that can limit your progress.


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