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Old 03-29-2012, 12:46 AM   #21 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by srdeo View Post
Don't try to push yourself too much just to keep up with your fiance. You will end up hurting yourself. Go with what is comfortable for you. It will especially important for you since you already have bad knees. Until you feel comfortable going fast don't. Have your fiance ride switch. You will prob ride at similar speed.

Keep pushing yourself. Just don't try to keep up with someone well beyond your skill level.
Thanks for the note of caution. I'm definitely not trying to keep with her! Not for another season at least. I want to be able to confidently link turns on greens before trying to link them on blues, but perhaps that is the wrong way to thinkg about it.
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Old 03-29-2012, 12:48 AM   #22 (permalink)
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The OP is riding at Snoqualmie central, which unfortunately has no good terrain in between super shallow greens and impressively difficult blues with some really long flat sections that necessitate holding a lot of speed. She'd have to drive over to Alpental to do her blues, and the Sessel lift over there that has some relatively mellow blue terrain isn't always turning.
I'm a "he" actually I'll be at Cypress Mountain the next two sundays so maybe I'll try a steeper slope there.
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Old 03-29-2012, 01:11 AM   #23 (permalink)
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I'm a "he" actually I'll be at Cypress Mountain the next two sundays so maybe I'll try a steeper slope there.
Ah, well... whoops.

At any rate, if you're going to be in the PNW for next year as well, you'll want to spend a lot of time at Snoqualmie summit west on the Pacific Crest lift (during the week, if you can swing it, weekends are crowded as hell on that run.) That hill in particular has some of the best low-mid level learning terrain I've ever seen, but it's closed for the season now.

For this season, keep an eye on the lift status for alpental, and try to get over there when Sessel is running. It's in between the difficulty of Central Express and Holiday, and doesn't have anything so flat that you'll get stuck when you wipe out. Do not get on the big main lift (Armstrong Express.) You will regret it bitterly.
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Old 03-29-2012, 01:49 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Otherwise, it's way better to stay on an edge. I think it's sloppy boarding to flatbase. Do very light carves but you're pretty much bombing. I do this on all long traverses, it's actually faster than flatbasing, and you rest each set of muscles every few seconds or so (instead of getting calf pump or quad pump by the end of the traverse).

Also, not sure what the hype is about keeping your weight centred. You actually need to have your weight in all different areas depending on the snow, your speed, etc. Best way to feel out what weight does is to start off heelsliding, then gradually put more weight on your front foot, then back to centre, then towards your back foot.
I agree. Above all, stay focus and keep calm.


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Old 03-29-2012, 02:21 AM   #25 (permalink)
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Do very light carves but you're pretty much bombing.
How do you do a "light" carve? I thought one needs to really dig the edge into the snow in order to carve (and therefore eliminate any sideslip).
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:12 AM   #26 (permalink)
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This sounds like a good trick. Can't wait to try it!
I hope it works well for you! Make sure you keep your athletic stance up while doing this.


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Originally Posted by PNWRider View Post
I understand what you're saying, but the only reason I was concerned with bombing straight down was so that I dont chicken out when attempting to do a toeside turn and the board is pointing straight down the fall line for a couple of seconds. I feel that if I cannot handle those 2 seconds of fall line on a green, then I can't really handle it on a blue either.
Ok, now I understand it. That's a natural fear when you're starting out. It's scary as shit to think about the board just pointing down the mountain & picking up speed when you're first getting started. Now that we've gotten that out of the way, stop thinking about the fear of pointing down the mountain. A trick I taught a friend was to bend his knees deeper when initiating a turn & straighten them out (back to a loose athletic stance) to finish the turn. What is your stance on your board? (angles, width?) I ask, because I think a duck stance is an easier way to gain control when starting out & the knee bending move works extremely well in a duck stance. No need to go to crazy angles, but it's something to consider & play with, maybe starting around +9/-9 or +12/-12. It's a more natural position for your knees to bend also, which will make the bending to initiate a turn trick a little easier to get down. It also occurs more naturally with a duck stance.

Try this on some greens & link a few turns successfully. Then try it on a milder blue, or a milder section of a blue run. Link a couple turns successfully on a blue & then consider going to another green & continuing to link turns on what is now much tamer terrain. Continue doing this back & forth, side slipping when needed. I would also suggest spending some time side slipping & traversing on your toe edge, since it seems turning to your toe side edge is scaring you a little.

Bombing down a green is really unnecessary to build the confidence needed to make the toe side turns. If I were you I'd work on linking turns successfully & being on a edge while picking up some speed as you make wide(r) S-turns or work on linking your C-turns. As long as you can hold a heel edge & a toe edge, you can stop. So don't be afraid to point the board down the fall line in these transitions. Worst case, you can always bail & fall (just be sure you don't put your hands out in front of you to stop the fall!!!). As Mixie said earlier, learning to fall is imperative to progressing in this sport, since you'll likely fall while pushing yourself to progress


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Originally Posted by PNWRider View Post
Thanks! I'm totally fine with doing the shallow greens by myself and working my way up while she's off on her own though, so I'm not rushing to try to catch up with her or anything.
No worries. I was just throwing that out there in case you felt you were being pressured to keep up with your fiance. I have no doubt she would wait for you in that case, but I don't know her so I have no idea, haha. It may be a good idea to ask her to go down a run with you, with her leading so you can watch what she's doing to link turns, etc. Maybe she can watch you ride & give you some pointers as well?


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Just bought the last medium size of these padded shorts in the greater Seattle area tonight on my way home
Hope you like them. They're great for keeping your ass padded & warm in the event you're sitting (or landing) in the snow for any period of time.

Last edited by handscreate; 03-29-2012 at 03:22 AM.
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:26 AM   #27 (permalink)
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Do at your own risk
The fear is pain in a fall, lack of control, undesirable speed.

Break it down into components. Mixie is right about falling. Also I found I fall more and harder on the flat area then steeper, it is like riding a bike very very slowly, go too slow and you fall. I don't like wrist braces because it teaches you it is okay to fall open handed and twisting on it.

On dry ground improve core/stomach muscles mental exercise

1) Jump up and pull your knees to your stomach, not feet to butt . try one leg at a time - the pulling up of your knee is going to teach you how to be light on your feet, also land softly in control and quietly. If you play basketball, think double pump. You will jump off your toes and land on your toes. Why- Sometime you might be driving the toe edge for a hard carve or panic braking on ice, when you board skips, jumps, slides, starts to get away from you, like when you hit a hard ice patch. Usually what will happen is , there is no more resistance on the board and your body becomes fully extended and you fall. Instead try pulling your board back to save it , or tuck into the fetal position. You may not understand it but your muscles will figure it out. The landing light on your feet will have you "save it"

2) Calf stretch toe lifts.

3) maintain your PT drills,

4) Although bad, stretch your neck , look over your left shoulder

Learn to Fall

-Throw a bunch of pillows and blankets on your bed, stand knee straight and fall face first, you can try to catch yourself with your arms - This is catching your front edge and face planting.

-Now try as you fall bend at your waist bend your knees fall think fetal position, hug yourself and try to impact with a larger surface area of your body. upper arm, shoulder. Sure could dislocate something but you could also break an arm , or get a spiral forearm fracture catching yourself.

-Try it backwards - like Loosing your heel edge ,"heel staking", falling up hill, or worse catching heel edge down hill , head plant backwards, you bell will be rung, so avoid it.

-Now try as you fall tuck, chest to knees and roll with it, there is a falling technique of using your arms surface area to disperse the energy, maybe you can find a youtube video, it is taught in martial arts.

Now you know how to fall lesson learned, never hit the ground fully extended, it hurts.

Confidence knowing it wont hurt as much it part of the fear.

Foot work - for now your left foot leads and your right foot follows or doing the opposite , this opposite action will change as you get faster. sit on the couch feet on the floor put some of your weight on your feet. lift your toes and go one your heels, move just your left toes down and lift your left heel (turn initiated) , hold a second ( board now pointing down hill) now do the same with the right foot ( riding toe edge now ). Now put your left heel down and lift your toes, and have your left foot follow. You are doing s-turns now. Keep doing it, The opposite motion will help prevent catching the down hill edge. You won't be actually steering with your just your feet, but it is the opposing action you are learning, to prevent edge catching.

Now stand , you are now on your board. if you try to steer by leaning forward , you will fall on your face, if you try to lean back, you will fall on the couch, so no leaning. Think karate kid your right leg is your bad leg, you can't put weight on it , you don't have to lift your arms in the air. If you put too much weight on your uphill foot, gravity will turn it into the downhill foot. Hop up and down on just your left, this is your dominant leg.

Daniel san - remember your right leg is bad, learn to do a forward roll, try it, you'll see your left legs bend , weight goes to the ball of your left foot , bend at your waist , hand hits the ground, weight is off your right leg ,top of your shoulder hits , and you tumble, if you do it slowly and stop at the point when you reach for the ground, but still balanced on your feet, this is your toe edge turn.

Now imagine, you are bout to sit a a chair but you are unsure if it is strong enough, so you slowly bend without totally committing to sit, you still have a bad right leg. If you get to the point where you actually sit down, then you would have fallen on the snow, so remember weight is aways on your feet.

To break, after the board points down hill, your right let will follow, now add more weight as it follows the left foot , and the board will stop.
Now gain the confidence knowing you can slow down if you get too fast.

Now for the mountain. whenever you ride an edge , try to over exaggerate and lift the other edge, you will do this by bending your knees.

Now point the board down hill, try the forward roll motion and sit on the chair drill, It is not the speed that you are scared of , but the stopping , you will quickly develop your stopping and turning stills.

I have very low ankle flexibility, so for me to get low, I have to bend at the waist or create heel lift.

Probably the longest post in my life.

good luck
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Old 03-29-2012, 03:52 AM   #28 (permalink)
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Where in the Pacific Northwest are you? We might be able to spand half a day together clinicing these topics...
That would be amazing. I'm in Seattle and alternate weekends in Vancouver BC. I was contemplating trying to make a trip down to Portland to try to book a class with you at Meadows but given my personal situation, my fiance and I are constantly driving back and forth between Seattle and BC, so a weekend to drive to Oregon is rare. I was sorry & sad to read about recent events with your former work place. Unbelievable that the management there cannot recognize true talent!

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For drills, it really sounds to me like you are intimidated by the toeside transisiton.
Pretty much I've tried to read every thread I could on this topic. I can transition from toeside to heelside with proper weight distribution so I *know* what a proper heel-to-toe should feel like (versus kicking out the back leg), but just can't do it!


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Next, go back to heelside Garlands. Why you might ask work heelside? Because it is generally the transition from heel to letting the board "point" that is the scary part for most people.
Spot on.

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Do NOT pressure the toe of the back foot UNTIL the turn is well established; about 45 degrees is ideal
OK, so back foot remains flat until the turn is 45 degree off the fall line.

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I have been helping Vicki on these
I've read up on almost all of Vicki's threads to learn as much as I could (very impressive & rapid progress! Kudos to her). So rapid in fact, that after her first couple of posts, the information was beyond my level

The cowboy stance sounds interesting. I'll try that on the slopes on Sunday.

Thanks for all the advice Snowolf! I'll let you know how it goes.
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Old 03-29-2012, 04:14 AM   #29 (permalink)
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Pretty much I've tried to read every thread I could on this topic. I can transition from toeside to heelside with proper weight distribution so I *know* what a proper heel-to-toe should feel like (versus kicking out the back leg), but just can't do it!

Bend ,squat, slowly rise up using just your left leg, this will put weight just on your left to pick up the necessary speed to turn. if you stand before getting the board pointing down hill, repeat, don't try to put weight on your rear foot unless you have a little bit of speed, hard to describe, you have to develop your own feeling.
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Old 03-29-2012, 04:36 AM   #30 (permalink)
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Default Don't fight gravity too hard.

One: Relax front foot and allow the board`s nose to slip down the fall line.

With weigh in the front add a little right heel drag and the nose will fall down the fall line. try to torque the board a little.

(Leftfoot/RightFoot) heel/heel, then flat/heel ,then toe/heel, then toe/flat, then toe/toe this is when you are cutting across the fall line

Going with the fall line is easier. When teaching my wife, I didn't teach her to go across until later. When you go across you have 2 forces, your momentum going where your nose is pointing , plus gravity pulling you down the fall line. When you momentum unexpected stops, it is easy to fall down the fall line and hit your head or face. Pointing straight down a flat green run , you are not fighting gravity hard.
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