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-   -   Recording Yourself for Critiques (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/tips-tricks-snowboard-coaching/49312-recording-yourself-critiques.html)

inpajamas 08-23-2012 08:54 AM

Recording Yourself for Critiques
 
Hey All,

It's still only August but I'm already thinking about getting my ish together so that I can be prepared for this upcoming season. A little bit about myself before I start with my questions: I ride mostly on the east coast, started 2 seasons ago (going into my 3rd) and have about 20 days of riding under my belt. I've been out to Vail and Breck over the past two years and have made it an annual thing to hit up the west coast for riding, so that type of all mountain terrain is what I'm trying to develop my skills for. I'd really like to succesfully ride down a mogul runs and tree runs this year if I can. But I'm also very aware that I could have really basic things I need to improve on so if you guys all come back and tell me I'm not ready for tough runs, I at least know where I stand.

So basically my question is, how should I go about recording myself while I ride so that helplful people such as yourselves are able to critique me better? I'm wondering things like:

1) What kind of camera do most people use (gopro?)

2) Should I have someone else record me while I ride? Or use that stick thing that people look like they're holding to record themselves? (what is that by the way)

3) Is it more beneficial to provide videos of me just riding easier runs so you can criticize really basic stuff, or is a wide variety of slopes better?

4) What view is the best angle for people critiquing? Full body from behind? From the side?


I'm really looking to make significant improvements this year and will probably take a lesson or two, but I'm not rich and this forum is easily the best place for constructive criticizm so I thought investing in a camera/making videos would be worth it.

Thanks! Any and all suggestions are greatly appreciated!


inpajamas

WVrider84 08-23-2012 09:23 AM

You are asking excellent questions. Its an eye opening experience to see yourself snowboard. I will give my personal take.

I am going to answer your questions out of order.

4) The best angle is all of the above. It is beneficial to see your self from the front /side / behind. Different perspectives can give you a lot of different insight into your riding. It is very hard to accurately critique from a "POV" with like a helmet cam or holding a gopro on a stick.

2) I think the best way to get good video for movement analysis / critiquing is to have someone recording you riding down a slope from a static position (Your friend rides down stops and records you riding down and past the camera). Think about it. If someone is standing still recording you they will capture all of the angles you want. As you are riding down the slope they will capture a front on perspective, as you ride past the camera they will capture the side perspective, and as you keep riding past they will record you from behind. Holding the camera on a stick makes a cool looking video. Personally I dont think its that useful for analysis.

1) I bought a gopro last year on proform. its a sweet camera especially for the stick type video or POV. I found that it is lacking when it comes to getting good video from a stationary perspective (having a friend go ahead stop and video tape you riding down the mountain). Since the gopro doesnt have an active zoom (and the best lens mode is wide angle) you get only a very short segment of video that's useful for analysis. Unless you are really close to the camera you will appear very small in the frame making it hard to really use the clip for analysis. I am personally going to buy a true HD camcorder this season that has image stabilization and a nice optical zoom and 60fps recording (they can be very affordable). I think this is the best way to go if you are looking to get good quality video for movement analysis purposes. If I didn't get the gopro for half off I wouldn't have bought it. I don't think they are worth the 300 dollar price tag just my 2 cents.

3) You should do all of the above. I think the toughest part is getting friends to go ride with you who are interested in doing Movement Analysis. Most of my friends just want to "ride" or "ski", so they arn't really interested in stopping to take video.

Getting good video of yourself is a great way to improve your technique.

tlake2568 08-23-2012 10:03 AM

Yo!

To answer your questions:

1.) Most people use a gopro because it is rugged, has an outer shell that protects the cam from the elements, and it shoots a pretty good video :thumbsup: Contour HD, ect will also work, but GoPro made a name for themselves, and the "Pros" love using them for SPECIFIC POV (point of view)
When you are watching a snowboarding DVD or movie back in the day, they are using high quality dedicated video cameras in specially built housing for the camera to protect against the elements. What you don't know is that the cost of those cameras were insane. Nowadays, you can get a Digital SLR with video capabilities, get a good lens on it, and you can really get some impressive shots... From personal Experiences learned however, Riding with a Digital SLR is not the smartest of things to do, as they dont take falls very well.

2 & 4.) Having someone ride behind/in front/side are all good angles. By doing multiple runs, we can edit and anayalze from multiple angles to critique your riding.
The pole you are referring to can be a monopod attached with the camera mount or, as a DIY project, you can size a metal broomstick from your local dollar store, cut it to fit, and then attach the camera mount to the other end of it. Simple search of google can provide DIY instructions.

3.) A good mixture of both. Show that you have the basics down first, then start to incorporate the more difficult tricks/tasks. Dont forget to get dynamic!

Hope this helps!

inpajamas 08-23-2012 12:21 PM

thanks for the responses guys. really appreciate the detailed feedback.

i guess i won't go for the gopro and i'll see if i can get a somewhat decent handheld camera that will be able to stand up to the elements a bit. i tried getting my gf to record me with her iphone once but it doesn't really work all that well. can't see enough detail to make out whether or not i'm doing anything right.

gonna do some camera research and hopefully in 5 months i'll be posting some videos to get some analysis help. thanks again!

slyder 08-23-2012 03:03 PM

I've used my cell phone to take video and that has worked well. Ive taken video of my kids to help show them what they are doing right or wrong. I have even posted those said videos to the forum for some of the.better riders help point out things I missed
So you don't need to spend money if you don't want to, to accomplish what you are trying to do.

inpajamas 08-24-2012 06:19 AM

thanks, slyder.

i think i'll try and give it another go with my phone first. maybe spend a little time trying to position myself better for better viewing angles and stuff. if for some reason that doesn't work, then i'll consider picking up a used camera or something.

thanks again guys!

slyder 08-24-2012 06:35 AM

inpj's you don't need super great angles and such. Sometimes just seeing it, you will pick out corrections that need to be made. At that point if you need more detail than go to that level.
I have been stationary and have followed from behind with my cell phone. It worked well enough to use.


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