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post #1 of 5 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 05:32 AM Thread Starter
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Hi, I've been snowboarding about 5 times now and have an arbor board, and it's a wide board and has the grip tech function - So when I was snowboarding today I was doing nice medium carves and small carves (not enough to slow me down too much), and I kept on noticing that when I turn toe-side the board sometimes grips into the snow and when I'm nearly half way through initiating the turn the board just sticks and I obviously fall over - I bend my knees, I do nice slow carves, but when I want to do anything a bit quick it just screws up (my board is actually quite heavy compared to most boards I've looked at).
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post #2 of 5 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 06:15 AM
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Ill go ahead and say you are probably doing skidded turns not carves, the feeling you may be getting just before hitting the snow is probably your edge really engaging and hooking you into your toeside turn.

Ive done this plenty when i was (and still am) learning to carve properly. I still cant do it very well at all and ive had much more than 5 days on snow. To be doing real carves after 5 days would be very very unusual, so dont take that as a swipe, just facts.

Also from my own experience speed actually helps carving, so by going slow you may be off balance or something like that. The other thing to make sure of is that you are not getting any toe drag, that can cause similar problems.

Ohh and BTW i dont think you asked a question, so im not sure why i answered.....

my names's Petey and i have gigantic balls
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post #3 of 5 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 05:04 PM Thread Starter
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cjcameron11 View Post
Ill go ahead and say you are probably doing skidded turns not carves, the feeling you may be getting just before hitting the snow is probably your edge really engaging and hooking you into your toeside turn.

Ive done this plenty when i was (and still am) learning to carve properly. I still cant do it very well at all and ive had much more than 5 days on snow. To be doing real carves after 5 days would be very very unusual, so dont take that as a swipe, just facts.

Also from my own experience speed actually helps carving, so by going slow you may be off balance or something like that. The other thing to make sure of is that you are not getting any toe drag, that can cause similar problems.

Ohh and BTW i dont think you asked a question, so im not sure why i answered.....
Thanks, I was just curious about what I was doing wrong
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post #4 of 5 (permalink) Old 09-02-2012, 05:06 PM Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
Yeah, with 5 times under your belt, you are not truly carving your turns yet most likely. What you are doing most likely is a skidded turn. A carve is where the tail follows in almost exactly the same path as the nose and your track in the snow is no more than about half a board width. The perfect carve is one where there is a thin cut in the snow no more than a few CM`s wide.

I am not sure exactly what you are describing here so a little more detail would help. My first guess is that what you are feeling is actually the board trying to get into the carve as you are increasing tilt in your turn. The catching feeling is most likely when the sidecut tries to fully engage and pull you into a tighter turn. You are not ready for this and don`t have the experiences to carve properly so you loose your balance.

Additionally, a carve can really only be maintained with stability at higher speeds. When this happens at slow speed, you have too much edge angle to maintain balance. It is like leaning too far into a turn on a bike at too slow of a turn.

Until you get a little more experience and start exploring actual carving, when this happens, try flattening the board out a little and extending your turn into a wider arc. This will often release the edge and allow you to regain your balance.
Sure, thanks for the tips!
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