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Old 12-14-2012, 10:01 AM   #11 (permalink)
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Yeah, I love high speed carving when the snow is good. Nothing like fresh corduroy in the morning for some hard carving!. I think you may be onto something about the short crowded runs; pretty hard to open it up safely in that environment. Out here yo see a fair amount of it. I even saw a guy today fruit booting with an alpine carving board. Thing looked like it as at least a 200 Cm and narrow! They dude was getting on it too. Not my style, but he was impressive doing it....props....
We got a couple guys out here at my local resort with 180+ alpine boards and aggressive forward stances. These guys just kill it and it makes me nostalgic for my early days snowboarding in the late 80s. I'm more mellow now, I enjoy opening it up when conditions and crowds are right but to go full-blown euro-carve style? Nah.
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Old 12-14-2012, 10:54 AM   #12 (permalink)
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carving feels reallly good on a nice sunny groomed day. you can always drag your hand down and wear out your gloves
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:48 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Wel I was working on my toe side a lot this past weekend and started to get the hang of it, I find its really hard to keep weight on that forward foot though... my be my stance.

I was doing really well and getting pretty quick.. I lost focus and caught some jagged ice and launched myelf face first into the ice, gashing my cheek open and ended up having to go to the ER the next morning. I still stuck it out and rode the rest of that day... and now Im going wednesday night YAY.
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Old 12-17-2012, 07:54 PM   #14 (permalink)
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Hi!

Well lets start by clearing up a very common misconception. Actual carving is a different animal than making standard linked turns which are skidded turns (the tail scrapes in a wider arc than the nose and the track in the snow is more of a smear wheres a carve leaves a very thin line in the snow as if done with a knife).

So, you do fine initiating and maintaining a good heelside turn but are having some issues with the toeside? First, is your main challenge the turn initiation or is it in maintaining the turn once it begins?

Some general tips for good toeside turn initiation:

1) Get your weight up onto your front foot so you have good torsional flex.

2) Flex down low anytime you are about to initiate a turn.

3) Dip your front shoulder a little bit down toward the nose of your board. This will put your shoulders parallel to the snow and set you up in a good perpendicular position relative to the slope.

4) When you drop your front knee down to apply toe pressure onto the toe edge with the front foot, roll the knee in toward your rear foot just a bit. This creates rotational force as well as twist.

5) Roll your back knee out toward the tail of your board. This adds more rotational force.

6) Position for front shoulder slightly over the toe edge of your board. This also adds rotational force and it also allows you to pressure the toe edge with your front foot more efficiently.

7) Make sure you don`t have the "mystery date" That is holding the back hand out in front of you. Get that back hand over the tail of the board behind you.

Now, once you are beginning to turn, slowly extend your legs to push against the board. This helps set your edge and it increases the efficiency of the board`s sidecut to make for a more powerful, controlled turn. Along with this, slowly shift your body weight toward the rear. At the apex of the turn, you should be centered and at maximum extension.

For good turn completion, continue your aft shift and begin to slowly flex down low again. This action helps reduce chatter and edge washout at the bottom of the turn.

One big issue for many people with the toeside turn initiation if a fear of commitment. The rider often feels as if they are leaning down hill. This is a natural apprehension and one that goes away with experience. You learn to trust your board and your own abilities with experience. The biggest inhibitor to good turn initiation is leaning back and hesitation. Leaning back prevents your board from being able to engage the sidecut into the snow and start the turn and hesitation creates a sideslip that then must be checked before turn initiation.

At your convenience, provide some more details about what you fee and when with regard to executing your toeside turn and we can narrow things down and hopefully get you some drills to work on the help you with this....
I did a lot of that this past weekend, though I found when transitioning from heel to toe and back it would get 'wobbly' until I leveled out and leaned downhill to add more pressure on the front foot.. I am having a hell of a time keeping enough pressure down and keep squatting down in my turns.
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Old 12-17-2012, 10:21 PM   #15 (permalink)
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Hmmm you could be too rigid on your front foot. You want to be dynamic with the turn, you just need to initiate with the front foot and you only need to be forward enough so your body is perpendicular with the slope.
When i'm starting my turn i'm pretty low but its almost like i'm standing up through the turn then i'm back low again.
Play around with it
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Old 12-17-2012, 11:47 PM   #16 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by DRA6N View Post
I did a lot of that this past weekend, though I found when transitioning from heel to toe and back it would get 'wobbly' until I leveled out and leaned downhill to add more pressure on the front foot.. I am having a hell of a time keeping enough pressure down and keep squatting down in my turns.
Keep working on it, it will come with feel and time. It all takes practice.
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Old 12-18-2012, 01:02 AM   #17 (permalink)
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...... Finally I am stationed in korea for a while and starting to get back into it full speed...
Which resort in Korea do you ride?
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Old 12-18-2012, 01:45 AM   #18 (permalink)
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I agree! True carving is a lost art!!!

Try tucking your back knee in twords the center of the board AFTER you have started the turn. This will keep you a bit more centered, and it will pull the sidecut of the board into better contact with the snow. Think of it as "pumping". Also, as was said above, keep the weight balanced, don't get in the backseat at all! You will wash. It will hold.....it just takes faith.


20+ years of riding and I still have a PJ.....yeah...I can carve a bit. Sometimes.
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Old 12-18-2012, 03:58 PM   #19 (permalink)
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We got a couple guys out here at my local resort with 180+ alpine boards and aggressive forward stances. These guys just kill it and it makes me nostalgic for my early days snowboarding in the late 80s. I'm more mellow now, I enjoy opening it up when conditions and crowds are right but to go full-blown euro-carve style? Nah.

LOL. Alpine Euro style carving is so out these days. I didn't even see any of it in Europe. The neo wetsuit on the mountain just doesn't suit my style
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Old 12-18-2012, 04:21 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by DRA6N View Post
I did a lot of that this past weekend, though I found when transitioning from heel to toe and back it would get 'wobbly' until I leveled out and leaned downhill to add more pressure on the front foot.. I am having a hell of a time keeping enough pressure down and keep squatting down in my turns.
Can you do toeside stops proficiently? If not, maybe you should spend some time practicing those until you get comfortable with them. Toeside stop is essentially an aggressive toeside turn. Find a gentle slope then progress to something a little steeper. From there you should be able to get more comfortable with toeside turns and you can start linking toe and heelside turns and you'll be on your way to shredding Valahalla.
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