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Old 12-21-2012, 04:27 PM   #21 (permalink)
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I don't really get the question. I've never found the board anymore catchy at high speed. Or problematic completely flat based either. I assume the RC has a lot to do with this but in either scenario it's just not an issue. I know the the 'catchy' feeling but it's happened like 3 times and has always resulted in a minor adjustment, not an actual catch. I just don't get the need to stay on an edge
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:47 AM   #22 (permalink)
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To a certian extent, I think the more conditioned you are to riding and flatbasing while riding, any "squirelling" from flat basing will be automatically compensated by muscle memory and you will still be stable. It's just balance that comes with practice. But front weighting helps a lot.

The other thing that helps requires a modification of your board. You put a base bevel on the edge like 2-3 degrees. Looking from the front, it would look like \_________________/ ....but only 2-3 degreees, not like 60. You should also detune (round) the tip and tail sections which helps in pretty much all riding situations. Look it up on Youtube.

This mod will help reduce squirelling and edge catching at the expense of requiring more lean to turn and have a longer turn transition....which only matters if you're reacing anyway. Ppl also do this as a performance tune for rails, such that it will not catch on nicks in the rail and domino you. It's better than "rounding" as a crude method (aka detuning) so it's no longer sharp anymore. The latter will reduce riding performance on normal trails.

You can also do a side bevel to maintain the 90 degree L-shape of the edge.

Last edited by rasmasyean; 01-17-2013 at 07:49 AM.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:51 AM   #23 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oldmate View Post
Mmmm dunno if I agree. I have flat based at massive speeds. It's about keeping your weight over your front foot and your shoulders in line with the board. If you are on an edge you are washing speed off
You're washing speed off if you're skidding on an edge. If you're carving on an edge you'll come out of the turn with more speed than you took into it.
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Old 01-17-2013, 07:57 AM   #24 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chomps1211 View Post
Correct me if I'm misinformed about this, but the snow conditions will make a world of difference in how squirely "flat basing" feels as well won't they? I mean on gouged & cut up hard pack or icy groomers, you've got more (...features?) looking to snag or engage your edges without your consent, right? So any lapse in concentration or technique can result in punishment! Plus, when riding flat based on hard pack like that, unless you are pressuring an edge, the running edges of the board are not really in contact with anything to help stabilize your tracking? Is this an accurate assessment?

The few times I've been able to ride in a couple inches of "Fresh",.. where the running length of the board was actually "In" the snow,.. riding flat seemed much more stable & controlled, and not just when bombing straight out!! (...bombing being a relative term for a NooB like me!)
This would also highly depend on your board. A stiff board will have a better time "plowing" through the chopped up snow than a really flexible board.
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Old 01-20-2013, 01:41 PM   #25 (permalink)
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Do not bevel the edge as noted below....you want a good edge for blasting...guaranteed going 50 mph you want edges and if beveled you are going to be squirrly, all over the place and be overcompensating your movements to get an edge, if you even get one with those beveled edges. You want the 90 degree edges to cut and bite....otherwise you will be washing out/wiping out. IMPROVE your skills.


Quote:
Originally Posted by rasmasyean View Post
To a certian extent, I think the more conditioned you are to riding and flatbasing while riding, any "squirelling" from flat basing will be automatically compensated by muscle memory and you will still be stable. It's just balance that comes with practice. But front weighting helps a lot.

The other thing that helps requires a modification of your board. You put a base bevel on the edge like 2-3 degrees. Looking from the front, it would look like \_________________/ ....but only 2-3 degreees, not like 60. You should also detune (round) the tip and tail sections which helps in pretty much all riding situations. Look it up on Youtube.

This mod will help reduce squirelling and edge catching at the expense of requiring more lean to turn and have a longer turn transition....which only matters if you're reacing anyway. Ppl also do this as a performance tune for rails, such that it will not catch on nicks in the rail and domino you. It's better than "rounding" as a crude method (aka detuning) so it's no longer sharp anymore. The latter will reduce riding performance on normal trails.

You can also do a side bevel to maintain the 90 degree L-shape of the edge.
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Old 01-20-2013, 03:41 PM   #26 (permalink)
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Is there a thread that talks about the 1/1 or 0/0 concept? I don't understand.
Thanks
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Old 01-20-2013, 03:47 PM   #27 (permalink)
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there's obviously a way to haul ass flat without eating it. I've seen many people succeed...but, from their body language, it always looks like they're "all in" for the risk. I've also seen just as many people get all the way to the bottom...then eat it so hard at full speed, rescue has to carry them away. Scary.
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Old 01-20-2013, 04:14 PM   #28 (permalink)
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Don't mean to hijack the thread but does anyone know of a good edge tuner thats not too expensive?
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Old 01-21-2013, 02:45 PM   #29 (permalink)
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from my limited experience , im in the staying on your edge concept.

you can of course flatbase it, but if the conditions are bad or choppy it takes very little for your board to catch some snow on top and just dig in...i never like to take that risk...personally i only flatbase when i am going extremely slow and just trying to make it pass a very long flat.

usually i try to keep sllight pressure on one of my edges, if i feel the board turning i go on the opposite edge...its basically going straight down and switching from edge to edge...i don't care if it scrubs off speed because it definitely allows me to feel a lot more in control than flatbasing it...and thats what i care about the most.
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Old 01-21-2013, 06:49 PM   #30 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Zcev5454 View Post
Everytime I seem to get going fast, I end up flat-basing and catch an edge. Any tips on how to stop doing this?
Slow down either lean down hill or pull up on the rear, which ever way your mind makes it work.

If you are just learning and traversing a lot with the board perpendicular to the slope, both feet have to work hard to keep the down hill edge up, and this should be your primary focus when sliding down perpendicular. If it is not, you will catch that edge.

If are moving in a manner where you have a front foot and rear foot, and you get going too fast and start to get scared , you will learn on your up hill foot out of fear, if you you lean on the uphill foot, that foot will start to fall down the hill in an unexpected and manner, it will fall either toe or heel side, whichever one is bearing the weight. If you have the weight on the uphill toe, the board will come around and catch toe side and face plant. If your weight is on the heel, you wont see it coming and you'll end up on your back looking at the sky.

I learned to do a jump whenver I space out and my rear foot gets a mind of its own. It is usually on a very flat area and I start to relax, stand straigt up and start looking around for the rest of my group.
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