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-   -   Advice you wish someone had given (beginner) you. (http://www.snowboardingforum.com/tips-tricks-snowboard-coaching/52794-advice-you-wish-someone-had-given.html)

Daggs 12-29-2012 08:15 AM

Advice you wish someone had given (beginner) you.
 
I've been snowboarding a few times the last couple seasons, but this is the first season I'm actually serious about learning the sport and progressing. So, in hindsight, are there any tricks, or pieces of adivce, that you wish you had known when starting out?

lonerider 12-29-2012 08:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Daggs (Post 558532)
I've been snowboarding a few times the last couple seasons, but this is the first season I'm actually serious about learning the sport and progressing. So, in hindsight, are there any tricks, or pieces of adivce, that you wish you had known when starting out?

Get a private/semi-private lesson from a good instructor.

MeanJoe 12-29-2012 08:28 AM

Agree 100% with lonerider... save yourself a lot of pain during the learning curve by learning to do things correctly the first time with lessons. You'll progress faster and build a proper foundation for your riding and avoid ingraining bad habits that will be harder to correct later.

Learn about layering and quality base layers, mid layers, and outerwear. Proper layers and good gear is the key to staying warm and dry while riding which makes for a happier day. Bulking up with cheap long johns, two pairs of socks, a sweater, scarf, and restrictive Columbia jacket is not the way to stay warm and dry.

Get a helmet. Seriously. It could save your life.

Read many of Snowolf's excellent posts on turn initiation, visualize the concepts even mimicking the moves on dry-land.

Read and understand the basic rules of etiquette and trail safety.

Ride trails appropriate for your ability level. You won't have fun falling every 10 feet on a black and everyone else will hate you for being there when you shouldn't be.

sabatoa 12-29-2012 08:54 AM

Learn switch early because you're not going to want to bother "starting over" once you get decent.

slyder 12-29-2012 08:57 AM

I think Mean Joe nailed this one. Simple, concise and dead on.

Me I was to ill informed and nieve and just went out and did it. Now that I'm learning park I'm taking this very same approach and just applying it to a different part of the sport.

Don't build up expectations of flying down all the runs. I took me about 3 outings to become beginner proficient. For many not all it takes a few days of riding to really click and then be comfortable on the green and blue runs. Keep using good form and you will progress quickly and safely.
Enjoy it is a blast.

AIRider 12-29-2012 12:53 PM

When on toe side edge, imagine a penny between your butt cheeks, and squeeze it.

chomps1211 12-29-2012 03:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AIRider (Post 558592)
When on toe side edge, imagine a penny between your butt cheeks, and squeeze it.

:blink: :blink: :huh: :question:
Won't the copper turn your ass cheeks green? :laugh:

AIRider 12-29-2012 04:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chomps1211 (Post 558648)
:blink: :blink: :huh: :question:
Won't the copper turn your ass cheeks green? :laugh:

Help pushing/aligning your pelvis over the board, thus making you flex more at the ankles, so you're not hunched over. That was my biggest problem when I first started out.

cb1021 12-29-2012 06:06 PM

Commit, more aggressive, use more body strength (it's a sport after all)

that1guy 12-29-2012 07:01 PM

Do not drink and ride a snowboard while you are learning. :dizzy:


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