How to avoid excessive use of the back leg, especially to initiate heel-side turns? - Page 2 - Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums
SnowboardingForum.com is the premier Forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 01-09-2013, 11:55 AM   #11 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Posts: 17
Default

Great tips guys! Quick question to liner or anyone else who wants to answer in reference to liner's post. What is happening with my back foot as the front foot is twisting? By stable, do you mean it's flat through the first part of the twist and as one works their way to the rocking stage, then the back foot follows to complete the carve?
chinobiz19 is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-09-2013, 12:07 PM   #12 (permalink)
Member
 
liner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New hampshire
Posts: 84
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by chinobiz19 View Post
Great tips guys! Quick question to liner or anyone else who wants to answer in reference to liner's post. What is happening with my back foot as the front foot is twisting? By stable, do you mean it's flat through the first part of the twist and as one works their way to the rocking stage, then the back foot follows to complete the carve?
Yes, in general

when just kinda free carving, I try and keep the back half of my board nice and flat and just engage my front edges, whichever one. For reference, my weight is still primarily hovering over my front foot(or maybe hanging just behind my front foot.) Keep your weight in unison with the board. You can still be a G and ride real far back if you want, but you still keep your weight as one with the board. Be one with the board haha. To me the hardest part of really perfecting carves(including the backfoot swing) is the weight. If you keep your weight balanced, and engage the turns correctly, as soon as you rock on your edge you can slow down, accelerate, turn, noseflip, 180, literally anything, all by flex in your feet, NOT your legs.

When you wanna do real quick carves in succession, you almost want the board to flex in a semi circle through the apex, how you achieve that would be a full on contour of the board you achieve from using say your front toe-side edge, and your back heelside edge, to initiate the turn lightning fast.

when all is said and done, if your ripping carves, your doing the "twist" for all of 1 second. Its a super fast technique that is soooo easily missed in the moment.

If you are familiar with a stick shift think clutch and gas, as in, give it a little toe action twist to start the turn then gradually follow with your back foot once the turn has been initiated.

You can also think of a roller coaster going through a turn, the front car leads, and the back car follows. after the turn the coaster has to flatten out before it can really enter the next turn.

Last edited by liner; 01-09-2013 at 12:35 PM.
liner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 06:46 AM   #13 (permalink)
jtg
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: WA
Posts: 458
Default

Yeah I'm confused now. I didn't think we were talking about carving.
jtg is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 06:53 AM   #14 (permalink)
Member
 
liner's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: New hampshire
Posts: 84
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Snowolf View Post
Overall, a pretty decent post with mostly correct information and you`re getting really close on the other points. You have mostly correct ideas here but you're not quite there and have a few misconceptions.

One big one is that no you don't need to point the board down the hill to make an edge change. In fact, on steep terrain, you want early edge change with the board across the fall line so you can work the top of the turn. What the board has to be doing to make any safe edge change is be traveling straight tip to tail with no sideslip. The board does not care what direction it is pointing.

I think you are trying to describe board performance concepts which are actually Tilt, Twist, Pivot and Pressure. I am assuming when you say "rock" you are referring to tilt. As for twist, you should not be using any twist if you are truly carving; this is all about tilt.

If you are doing a dynamic skidded turn, twist is certainly not for just the initiation of the turn; you maintain twist throughout the entire turn.

So, we use different board performance concepts depending on the type of turn we want to perform.

Not dissing you or trashing your info, just adding a little bit of higher level information to the already good grasp you have here......cheers...
Thanks for the feedback! I teach snowboarding at my local mountain and the "stance, twist, rock" is the thing they teach so I guess it has rubbed off a bit. Hoping to get level 2 cert by the end of the season, so terminology is important. 90% of my students are under 10 years old, so its not so much telling them the right info, but getting them to do the right thing. And feel it.

Your absolutely correct on the board pointing downhill, I meant you have to come back to neutral before you can completely switch edges.

not being able to see the rider in question makes it a bit difficult doesnt it :/.

As far as carving, I had a instructor tell the twist carve thing and always just accepted it. Today when I go out Ill have to give a look at my mechanics. your right, that doesnt make sense....

Snow, you are an wealth of incredible informative goodness!!!


We werent talking about carving, I was just going off on a tangent.

Last edited by liner; 01-10-2013 at 06:57 AM.
liner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 08:51 AM   #15 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Matthews, NC
Posts: 4
Default

Thanks for all the good advise. I learned snowboarding on my own and this will certainly change the way I ride.

I currently ride goofy even though I am right footed and I think it is because I use my back foot to steer. After reading this it looks like I have been riding wrong for 12 years. Should I try and ride regular now? Or just continue to ride goofy and try these techniques?

I look forward to your advise.
bigwinw is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 09:15 AM   #16 (permalink)
-LIFETIME MEMBER-
 
SnowOwl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Location: Bear Mountain
Posts: 836
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigwinw View Post
Thanks for all the good advise. I learned snowboarding on my own and this will certainly change the way I ride.

I currently ride goofy even though I am right footed and I think it is because I use my back foot to steer. After reading this it looks like I have been riding wrong for 12 years. Should I try and ride regular now? Or just continue to ride goofy and try these techniques?

I look forward to your advise.
Continue to ride goofy, just tweak the errors. Dominate foot doesn't matter in snowboarding. Skaters who ride regular sometimes ride goofy and vice verse. Its about comfort so just fix the little things and fine tune yourself and you'll be
SnowOwl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-10-2013, 09:39 AM   #17 (permalink)
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Matthews, NC
Posts: 4
Default

That's what I was hoping someone would say. Headed to Breck in a week so I'll have some time to devote to practicing.
bigwinw is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 08:20 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0 PL2
VerticalSports
Baseball Forum Golf Forum Boxing Forum Snowmobile Forum
Basketball Forum Soccer Forum MMA Forum PWC Forum
Football Forum Cricket Forum Wrestling Forum ATV Forum
Hockey Forum Volleyball Forum Paintball Forum Snowboarding Forum
Tennis Forum Rugby Forums Lacrosse Forum Skiing Forums