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Old 03-05-2013, 02:22 AM   #101 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by poutanen View Post
Yeah, I ride about 1/2" wider than reference stance, and the stance just happens to be about 1/4" back from centre. So I put the forward binding 1/2" further forward than reference and I'm off to the races!

It's certainly harder to ride in powder though. Great for switch, not great for every other aspect of riding...
Got it. Thanks.

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Originally Posted by ItchEtrigR View Post
As long as your centered over your sidecut, you'll be good. Don't push your stance on boards with setback too forward otherwise you'll be ahead of the waist on switch and in front of the tails flex point while regular. IMO I wouldn't tinker with it too much or at all, as switch is just a matter of practise, centering a stance on a directional board isn't going to make you learn any easier. It's just going to make your tip & tail the same length, off center your stance with the sidecut and flex pattern of the board...
Got it. Thanks.
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:25 AM   #102 (permalink)
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The transition from one edge to the other is the dangerous point in the turn. Too soon or too late and you catch an edge. Your body remembers that from learning the first time. Good news is you'll learn it a lot faster the second time.
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Old 03-05-2013, 09:52 AM   #103 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by ItchEtrigR View Post
As long as your centered over your sidecut, you'll be good. Don't push your stance on boards with setback too forward otherwise you'll be ahead of the waist on switch and in front of the tails flex point while regular. IMO I wouldn't tinker with it too much or at all, as switch is just a matter of practise, centering a stance on a directional board isn't going to make you learn any easier. It's just going to make your tip & tail the same length, off center your stance with the sidecut and flex pattern of the board...
I would say this depends on your progression.

While you're learning, the sidecut shape does not matter as much because you're not going to be carving a whole lot of your riding...at least not to the point where the "sidecut profile" really matters. If your board is directional, it likely has a significantly longer nose than tail. Therefore, when you are performing SKIDDED turns, riding switch will be harder because there would be more rear edge to drag on the snow...making it harder to turn. It's the basic principle of leverage, where you would put your hands more toward the end of a tire iron to producing more force on the nut. So it would take more work to skid the board. You can definately feel it, especially when you're much better, which is why they make twin boards.
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Old 03-05-2013, 02:09 PM   #104 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by rasmasyean View Post
I would say this depends on your progression.

While you're learning, the sidecut shape does not matter as much because you're not going to be carving a whole lot of your riding...at least not to the point where the "sidecut profile" really matters. If your board is directional, it likely has a significantly longer nose than tail. Therefore, when you are performing SKIDDED turns, riding switch will be harder because there would be more rear edge to drag on the snow...making it harder to turn. It's the basic principle of leverage, where you would put your hands more toward the end of a tire iron to producing more force on the nut. So it would take more work to skid the board. You can definately feel it, especially when you're much better, which is why they make twin boards.
I don't know, I'm no instructor, maybe it is easier to center your stance on a directional twin, I just don't understand how that is going to make riding switch easier when a directional setback twin is already designed to ride switch, its just performance orientated for riding regular.

Extreme placement to center the stance is simply going to move your axis away from the waist of the board and put you on or in front of the flex point of the tail.

To me that sounds like it is going to make the ride worse both in switch & regular.

Now I understand your concern about performance, but skidded turns? That technique is not far away once the rider has learned to get on edge. And while it's true you'll get equal performance from the board if it's a true twin, the rider is still going to have to learn to ride the board switch efficiently before they can expect any performance from it.

Maybe one of the instructors can share the knowledge.
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Old 03-05-2013, 05:17 PM   #105 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Donutz View Post
The transition from one edge to the other is the dangerous point in the turn. Too soon or too late and you catch an edge. Your body remembers that from learning the first time. Good news is you'll learn it a lot faster the second time.
This is the exact problem I've been having recently. I caught an edge earlier this season doing this switch and slammed my tailbone really hard on ice!
Holy crap it hurt! I was lying there on my back for a good few minutes, holding my ass, gritting my teeth, repeatedly chanting "shit, shit, shit, shit, I've broken something" in a whispery voice. That's just how friggin painful it was.
I was convinced I'd broken my tailbone, but I realized soon enough that I hadn't. This actually surprised me. And made me order a pair of slam shorts the next day. Probably the best thing I've bought this season, because it did happen again a few times but this time I only felt the impact and, so this time I could actually walk up stairs the following week!
Also saved my tailbone on a few big jumps. I'm not trying to scare anyone else here learning to ride switch- I'm just pointing out that Donutz made a really good point.

If you're local hill is always icy like the one I've been going to, a pair of slam shorts wouldn't be a bad investment if you're learning to ride switch.

As far as skills go, buttering has really improved my switch riding, and it's fun! I learned to butter properly this weekend and now riding switch is a lot easier because if things get too sketchy I can just swivel back into my regular direction. I'd recommend learning that if you haven't already. It also tastes good on toast!

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Old 03-05-2013, 05:25 PM   #106 (permalink)
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why do i feel like everybody is staring at me while i was practicing my switch last week?
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Old 03-05-2013, 05:32 PM   #107 (permalink)
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why do i feel like everybody is staring at me while i was practicing my switch last week?
That's normal. It's because you're used to being good when riding regular and don't think about people watching much.

If you wear and use high-end gear that's brightly colored, chances are that other people really are watching you. I have a neon lime green jacket and bindings, which has definitely made me the one of brightest guys on the hill where I've been so far. Don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing, but it does get attention.
It really doesn't matter though, unless you're one of those rich skiers who buys all the top-of-the-line equipment and then attempts to go skiing for the first time! Those guys...

Personally, when I'm riding switch I'm crap and always feel like I'm being watched from the lift, and being dressed like a bright green Sharpie marker doesn't help!
If I get too worried about it, I just switch back to good ol' goofy and then anyone watching would have no choice but to realize oh, he was just learning switch!

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Old 03-05-2013, 05:35 PM   #108 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by Gdog42 View Post
That's normal. It's because you're used to being good when riding regular and don't think about people watching much.

If you wear and use high-end gear that's brightly colored, chances are that other people really are watching you. I have a neon lime green jacket and bindings, which has definitely made me the one of brightest guys on the hill where I've been so far. Don't know if that's a good thing or a bad thing, but it does get attention.
When I'm riding switch I'm crap and always feel like I'm being watched from the lift, and being dressed like a bright green Sharpie marker doesn't help!
lol so true, having 560 dollar never summer board, and a hero 3 on my head, people prolly going man "lookie what do have here, I wonder what's he's camming"? lol

idk dude it's just feels like it's 2011 all over again

I fell several times, worst of all I tend to forget what to do when I tried for the first time last week, it's like I am going down and forget what to do so turning to my regular stance, I was basically fighting it to do the opposite
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:26 PM   #109 (permalink)
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Just wanted to add that I'm loving getting into switch.

I've been riding for nearly 20 years and never had any desire to learn switch or spend any time in the parks (I used to do laps when I first started out but I can't afford to injure myself these days so I stopped that). Up until a few weeks ago, I was all about the trees, steeps, and bumps, and thought switch was useless for me and a waste of time on the slopes. I've always had a directional board and didn't even think it was possible.

But then this year I started going with my girlfriend, who is a low to mid intermediate, and I was looking for something to keep me occupied as she falling-leafed her way down the slope (she has since gotten much much better, thankfully). So I tried switch.

The first couple of days were pretty brutal (including one really bad edge catch on hardpack leading to a tailbone slam, pretty much exactly as Gdog described), but by day three I was pretty fluid and wasn't catching any edges. Soon after that I was hitting 180s in the flats both frontside and backside, regular and switch. By the end of day 4, I was switching back and forth at least every 100 feet while carving between each switch. It's such a giddy feeling.

I've found that the directional board doesn't really reduce the ability or fundamentals of riding switch in terms of turning, the main problem is that it's just really slow (this is on a NS Raptor). But I'm not at the point where I need more speed at switch yet.

After riding this long, I really wasn't expecting this whole other level of enjoyment. Flipping 180s and riding out switch feels sooo good! (and for some reason, especially the first heel-to-toe turn after a 180, I have no idea why).
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Old 03-05-2013, 06:47 PM   #110 (permalink)
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Originally Posted by vknyvz View Post
why do i feel like everybody is staring at me while i was practicing my switch last week?
Was practicing switch under the chair lift today, caught an edge, and went into a monkey roll in the snow. A group of teens on the lift shouted out "don't worry! You'll get it! Keep trying!"
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