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Old 10-27-2013, 03:18 PM   #11 (permalink)
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Yeah, steep slopes usually screw people's technique up when they stop committing to their turns because most people don't want to dip their upper body down to match the steepness of the slope as they turn and that brings all of those problems.

In instructing one of the techniques we use is to tell people to 'teapot' when they turn on steep slopes.

So their front hand because the funnel of a teapot and they have to pour water out every time they turn and that basically forces people to match their upper to the angle of the slope every time they turn.
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Old 10-27-2013, 03:20 PM   #12 (permalink)
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Overcoming that fear and actually WEIGHTING your front foot on the steeps....thats where fun will blow your mind....its the best thing ever.....
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Old 10-27-2013, 03:35 PM   #13 (permalink)
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Shift your bindings toward your toes.
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Old 01-12-2014, 07:10 AM   #14 (permalink)
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Can anyone simplify the principle of linking turns, for the exceptionally hard-of-thinking newcomer like me?
I can make my way down the mountain on either heel or toe (toe is very strenuous on my insteps for some reason), but linking the two is counterintuitive to the most fundamental lesson I've learned: NEVER let the downhill edge bite.
I can just about link on a very gentle slope, staying very close to the fall-line - but cannot see how a turn when trimming across the slope can possibly happen without engaging the fatal downhill edge . . .
Ive read all about twisting the board, and biting with the front edge first - but still can't see how this can avoid tripping over that edge. Is there a simple explanation? In words of one syllable? : )

Last edited by offshore2morro; 01-12-2014 at 07:14 AM.
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Old 01-12-2014, 07:21 AM   #15 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offshore2morro View Post
Can anyone simplify the principle of linking turns, for the exceptionally hard-of-thinking newcomer like me?
I can make my way down the mountain on either heel or toe (toe is very strenuous on my insteps for some reason), but linking the two is counterintuitive to the most fundamental lesson I've learned: NEVER let the downhill edge bite.
I can just about link on a very gentle slope, staying very close to the fall-line - but cannot see how a turn when trimming across the slope can happen without engaging the fatal downhill edge . . .
I think the issue may be that you're connecting "Never let the downhill edge bite" with "Never pressure your downhill edge", but in reality you can still pressure the downhill edge without making it bite and catch on the snow.

You only catch your downhill edge when you pressure it at the wrong time AND with the wrong weight distribution.

I actually have a free video series on linking turns if you're having trouble visualizing what you need to do (sorry it's not in HD and requires an email opt-in, I'm working on re-doing them now in HD and removing any opt in requirements in the next update of my member's area): Beginner Snowboard Lessons
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:34 AM   #16 (permalink)
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Question Initiating the turn?

Thanks for that super quick reply.
I've seen lots of video on the subject of linking turns - but they all make it look easy without clarifying what's happening under your feet. I suspect the good guys have forgotten how baffling some things are when you're learning.
I'm still left guessing: do you (almost) flatten out your front foot, releasing the edge at the front and intiating a downhill SLIDE - drifting the front end downhill BEFORE you can engage the new edge?
Is THAT what I'm seeing?
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Old 01-12-2014, 08:49 AM   #17 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offshore2morro View Post
Thanks for that super quick reply.
I've seen lots of video on the subject of linking turns - but they all make it look easy without clarifying what's happening under your feet. I suspect the good guys have forgotten how baffling some things are when you're learning.
I'm still left guessing: do you (almost) flatten out your front foot, releasing the edge at the front and intiating a downhill SLIDE - drifting the front end downhill BEFORE you can engage the new edge?
Is THAT what I'm seeing?
Okay, from your description it seems you're trying to avoid completely engagement the downhill edge still, which is the problem. As I said earlier, it's not about avoiding engaging the downhill edge, but rather about engagement it properly.

You actually WANT to engage the downhill edge in this case.

So to put it in your words it's not:

"do you (almost) flatten out your front foot, releasing the edge at the front and intiating a downhill SLIDE - drifting the front end downhill BEFORE you can engage the new edge?"

But rather you should be doing this:

Your front foot swaps to the other edge (toe to heel or heel to toe), followed immediately by your back foot.

You didn't mention anything about how your body turns as well, which is possibly where you're going wrong because as long as your body is working with your feet correctly, you shouldn't be catching an edge.

In simple speak you would be turning like this if you were changing turns:

- Head turns a looks where you want to turn
- Shoulders and upper body follow head
- Hips follow shoulders and upper body
- Knees and ankles follow hips

(if your instructor is US and not Canadian, he'd teach you to turn from bottom up instead of top to bottom, but either method is fine)

Honestly if you can I'd highly recommend taking an on-hill lesson. It sounds a lot like you're trying to learn this by yourself, but it will speed up this early learning process 10 times when you have an instructor walking you through the steps.
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Last edited by Jed; 01-12-2014 at 08:57 AM.
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Old 01-12-2014, 09:14 AM   #18 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offshore2morro View Post
Can anyone simplify the principle of linking turns, for the exceptionally hard-of-thinking newcomer like me?
I can make my way down the mountain on either heel or toe (toe is very strenuous on my insteps for some reason), but linking the two is counterintuitive to the most fundamental lesson I've learned: NEVER let the downhill edge bite.
I can just about link on a very gentle slope, staying very close to the fall-line - but cannot see how a turn when trimming across the slope can possibly happen without engaging the fatal downhill edge . . .
Ive read all about twisting the board, and biting with the front edge first - but still can't see how this can avoid tripping over that edge. Is there a simple explanation? In words of one syllable? : )
oh man, when you switching edges, you also want to stack your weight to that edge at the same time. think of pivoting your body at the bottom of your board.
DO NOT switching edges when your weight is stacked over the other edge.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bX-5rpqaLd8

Last edited by speedjason; 01-12-2014 at 09:17 AM.
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Old 01-12-2014, 11:59 AM   #19 (permalink)
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"I'd highly recommend taking an on-hill lesson"
That's exactly what I did (in Czech Republic) but to my dismay - instead of taking us up the mountain - we got our lesson on a kiddie slope with virtually no slope - and even less snow, and learnt to do all the stuff I already knew and nothing more. It's difficult to tell your instructor 'tell me something I don't know' - even when he does speak English. Communication barrier!
Thanks for the help anyway, guys. Is a certain amount of speed essential to the technique? Is it possible to go too slow to pull off a complete turn, btw?
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Old 01-12-2014, 12:13 PM   #20 (permalink)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by offshore2morro View Post
"I'd highly recommend taking an on-hill lesson"
That's exactly what I did (in Czech Republic) but to my dismay - instead of taking us up the mountain - we got our lesson on a kiddie slope with virtually no slope - and even less snow, and learnt to do all the stuff I already knew and nothing more. It's difficult to tell your instructor 'tell me something I don't know' - even when he does speak English. Communication barrier!
Thanks for the help anyway, guys. Is a certain amount of speed essential to the technique? Is it possible to go too slow to pull off a complete turn, btw?
Ah, that's too bad about the lesson. I'd say a tiny bit of speed is useful, but you don't really need more than that to get used to linking turns.

Mainly concentrate on linking up your body like I described and also the making sure you don't ride back foot so you don't end up using your board like a rudder but use the whole board instead (putting your weight a little forward-ish or balanced in the middle of your board is helpful for initiating each turn).
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