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Old 10-05-2012, 08:55 AM   #1 (permalink)
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Default My Brethren to the North

The Canadian Visa website makes it sound like I can hop, skip right into Canada whenever I damn well please (OK, maybe I'm exaggerating slightly).

I emailed a Canadian visa lawyer, and he said I was pretty much SOL.

Here's the skinny:I want to live, work and ride in Canada, beginning September 2013.
I will be 23
I will have an undergraduate degree.
I'm a male
I'm American

Given this information, can anyone please tell me how to gain access to your winter wonderland?

Thanks
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:45 AM   #2 (permalink)
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If you have a criminal record, you're SOL. Other than that, no idea why that lawyer was so negative. Hell, the majority of the staff at every mountain I've been to is Oz or Kiwi. I feel like a friggin' minority (plus I can't understand what the hell they're saying )

AFAIK unless you're actually looking for citizenship, we don't have any particular bias for or against any country (except Iran).

Find the nearest Canadian Consulate and do a quick inquiry.
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Old 10-05-2012, 09:54 AM   #3 (permalink)
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Yeah getting a VISA to work up here is pretty easy methinks. We've got tons of foreign workers here. Best bet is to find a job first, and they'll get the visa for you. Alberta has a labour shortage and apparently BC is heading for one too. Plenty of opportunity here, and some DAMN GOOD SNOWBOARDING!
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Old 10-05-2012, 11:10 AM   #4 (permalink)
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First off, unless you're claiming refugee status or sanctuary, don't use a visa lawyer, they just want their fee. Contact a consulate office directly.

As an american, you don't need anything special to visit and live here for an extended period (a year?) Working here is a different matter, but I don't believe that it is anywhere near as complicated as geting a US green card.

What Canada is cracking down on is false refugee claimants
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Old 10-05-2012, 11:17 AM   #5 (permalink)
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Worrdddd. Thanks.
What is the most ideal and realistic job for a newcomer (i.e. someone without seniority in any sector)?

I'm trying to live like a friggin' monk for the next year, so I need not work full time when the snow is falling. I heard that working for any resort is not optimal, especially when, with a rank like mine, you're working lifts, as they have the ability to black out your pass. Is this true?

Lastly, I imagine that when the snow does fall that that is when the least number of people want to work, but also, given the time of year, when the employer needs his or her staff most. Is this correct? What's the balance like?

Thanks for all the help!
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Old 10-05-2012, 02:31 PM   #6 (permalink)
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There's some bad advice in this thread.

Unless you work under the table for cash you will need a work permit to work in canada, which gets you the cdn equivalent of a US social security number. Few employers will sponsor you to get one if you are doing basic seasonal work. The reason that ski resorts in Canada are heavily populated with young aussie's and Brits and Kiwis is that there is an arrangement among commonwealth countries that makes it very easy for younger citizens of those countries (25 and under) to work in other commonwealth countries, so there's a whole crew of aussies and cdns on the never summer plan, working resorts alternatively in the northern and southern hemispheres. As a US citizen if you were to come up north and apply for a job at the local subway restaurant for example they would ask you for your goverment provided social insurance number, which all employers must collect from each employee - it's used to ensure taxes are paid and so on. To get one you need a work permit, which is not typically easily obtained unless you have special skills that are identified under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

Consider living like a monk in the US, working three jobs, and stacking up cash and then coming up here and living like a snowboarding monk, never miss a powder day b/c you have no job to get in your way. Or consider gettting a resort job in the US where you can work and ride.

Canada welcomes you in your youthful male amercianness to come up here and ride our snowy wonderland, and spend your greenbacks freely, and maybe even consort with our Canadian ski bunnies at their discuretion, but you can't take jobs from our own youthful canadians or their commonwealth pals, without applying to the government to do so.

Last edited by Lamps; 10-05-2012 at 02:49 PM.
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Old 10-08-2012, 03:42 PM   #7 (permalink)
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This is where you start - Application to Work in Canada: Work Permits

As far as I am aware there is no easy was into Canada like there is for some of its commonwealth partners.

I would hit up Alaska or Utah, it would be much easier.

Having said that do you have any skills? If so that changes everything.

Oh and in case someone sees Lamps post above the age for Brits, Aussies and Kiwis is 30.
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Old 10-08-2012, 08:15 PM   #8 (permalink)
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What Lamp said. I'm an American who was sponsored for a work permit as a "skilled worker". It took 6 months to get here after I accepted the job. It ain't gonna happen bro. Like they said, go to Utah. That's where I'm from!

Of course if you are a skilled worker and a member of a trade union, there are construction jobs to be had here. Some of the tradesmen are coming in from the states.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lamps View Post
There's some bad advice in this thread.

Unless you work under the table for cash you will need a work permit to work in canada, which gets you the cdn equivalent of a US social security number. Few employers will sponsor you to get one if you are doing basic seasonal work. The reason that ski resorts in Canada are heavily populated with young aussie's and Brits and Kiwis is that there is an arrangement among commonwealth countries that makes it very easy for younger citizens of those countries (25 and under) to work in other commonwealth countries, so there's a whole crew of aussies and cdns on the never summer plan, working resorts alternatively in the northern and southern hemispheres. As a US citizen if you were to come up north and apply for a job at the local subway restaurant for example they would ask you for your goverment provided social insurance number, which all employers must collect from each employee - it's used to ensure taxes are paid and so on. To get one you need a work permit, which is not typically easily obtained unless you have special skills that are identified under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA).

Consider living like a monk in the US, working three jobs, and stacking up cash and then coming up here and living like a snowboarding monk, never miss a powder day b/c you have no job to get in your way. Or consider gettting a resort job in the US where you can work and ride.

Canada welcomes you in your youthful male amercianness to come up here and ride our snowy wonderland, and spend your greenbacks freely, and maybe even consort with our Canadian ski bunnies at their discuretion, but you can't take jobs from our own youthful canadians or their commonwealth pals, without applying to the government to do so.
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