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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey guys. So about me .. I’m 22 I live in Canada and I have a question for y’all. I started snowboarding 2 years ago once I moved to a mountain town and put in two half seasons. I’ve taught myself how to ride from scratch … after a day or less in my first season I was carving down moguls, double blacks, anything no problem.. toe and heel. And I don’t mean windshield washing I mean carving .. I have rode with many people seasoned skiers snowboarders and none can out shred me down double blacks, moguls you name it ..everyone’s always shook. I recently got into backcountry riding at end of last season and a shit ton this season.. jumping off various cliffs/ rocks 5-15 feet tall regularly. Sometimes MUCH taller .. I’ve also at the end of last season decided to teach myself a front side 360 off/large jumps. I had probably less than an hour or so in the park .. It was pretty successful. (3 attempts at 360s) the resor of the time was just sending it off the big jumps lol I’ve taught myself everything without a single lesson. Am I too late to go pro? I’ve developed a deep passion for this sport and would love to see how far I can take it.. everything so far has felt real natural to me and I feel like I haven’t been able to really push myself yet … are there even any pros that start this late? Am I delusional? Also the problem is there isn’t really an access to any airbag jumping facilities anywhere near me. I’m in Alberta and they all seem to be in whistler. Ps u can check out my instagram for some vids to reference Lucasspad_adv **EDIT I don’t have expectations to be a park pro … I know this is a difficult road I’m more into the adrenaline rush of dropping a cliff or taking a steep backcountry run, so I guess I mean more a backcountry professional rider. Freeride world tour or sumn like that EDIT I had to add in some stuf as I really hate sounding cocky but it’s the truth hah.. a little bit about me .. I grew up in the prairies and played multiple sports I succeeded very well in Hockey , soccer and picked up Mma in high school and natural talent wise for fighting .. well I was out 🥊 ppl I had no business with , ive succeeded in endurance sports like top 3 of my age in X country regionally without a single practice lol I’ve left these sports behind since moving out west. I recently started my own construction business which at the time had zero dollars to my name , In which has allowed me to fund my newly found snowboarding.so no I do not have a trust fund. My parents aren’t loaded w cash just hard workers.
 

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If Buckhouse is a “Pro”… anyone can go Pro!

But in all seriousness… if you have the talent/ability, can always compete in Pro-Am events and see where you stand…

Work at/get your local shop to sponsor you, and work up the Brand reps that way etc.

Post enough gnarly vids of your riding to socials, can try to get noticed and apply to be a brand ambassador etc.

It’s never “too late”, it’s normally just being realistic with expectation and ability.
 

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The odds are against you but there is always a chance.

I have some friends that are GREAT at freestyle. I'm talking flips into trails and stuff, who compete/used to and aren't pro. It's all about catching the right eye at the right time.

Also, the term pro is pretty vague anymore. Like make a living off it without a day job? Get free stuff and be well know?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If Buckhouse is a “Pro”… anyone can go Pro!

But in all seriousness… if you have the talent/ability, can always compete in Pro-Am events and see where you stand…

Work at/get your local shop to sponsor you, and work up the Brand reps that way etc.

Post enough gnarly vids of your riding to socials, can try to get noticed and apply to be a brand ambassador etc.

It’s never “too late”, it’s normally just being realistic with expectation and ability.
word! Thanks. I’m not really lookinginto being a park pro.. I more want to compete in the free ride tour and do gnarly backcountry shit. Be a pro in that way. Check out my vids see if I have enough talent.. I really have a year total of snowboarding under my belt. Lucasspad_adv
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The odds are against you but there is always a chance.

I have some friends that are GREAT at freestyle. I'm talking flips into trails and stuff, who compete/used to and aren't pro. It's all about catching the right eye at the right time.

Also, the term pro is pretty vague anymore. Like make a living off it without a day job? Get free stuff and be well know?
I mean more stay away from park pro and get to the level to compete in freestyle world tour and be sponsored. By someone big .. so I guess Backcountry pro.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Going pro is overated. I always tell people to not turn your hobby into a career.
I also am a contractor and started my own business which was my “dream job” and still don’t feel I’m happy with this. I’m very competitive have done very well in MMA hockey soccer throughout my life and the more I compete in a sport the more I love it.
 

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My friend was doing back flips in his first month of snowboarding...
But you remind me of a 22 year old me, when I first moved to a mountain town, and I thought I was a natural, and thought it was totally feasible to get paid to ride powder.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
My friend was doing back flips in his first month of snowboarding...
But you remind me of a 22 year old me, when I first moved to a mountain town, and I thought I was a natural, and thought it was totally feasible to get paid to ride powder.
Hahah right on man… that’s crazy. So like Did he just send it at the mountain? I’ve never tried one.. or have a gym near by to try it ..if that’s the case
 

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A: Being a pro, in a sustainable way that allows you to not live broke, and still enjoy it 10+ years down the line?
B: Have some sort of career, invest wisely. Be a millionaire/multi-millionaire and still snowboard a lot. (You are so lucky remote work is normalized now).

Which has a better percentage chance of happening?
B, by a long, long, long shot. And this assuming you have some natural ability, had trust fund parents, and started at like age 5. Being a millionaire is not enough these days, by the way. Unless you are frugal af.

I see tons of people like you doing option A, but at a younger age and a trust fund. Let's say all of them use the trust fund at some point. It doesn't end well unless you absolutely love it to the point you enjoy poverty.

There is a fair amount of people doing some version of option B in their 20's/30's. They get 100's of days on snow and don't generally worry about money except competing with trust fund babies for real estate in mountain towns.

You will have to be both lucky and exceptional to make it as a pro from any age. You can be fairly stupid and mediocre with a work ethic and rake in money while still getting days on snow.
 

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I don't think you need to answer this question: just ride like you want to, train hard, go build stuff, if you like it and you'll see how things wraps out.

Now if you want an honest answer: nope, no ways and certainly not on the FWT, which is the discipline thtat requires the most experience out of them all. You can "cheat time" in the park by being incredibly talented at acrobatic stuff—and landing a 3 after two season is not that kind of talent—much less understanding the backcountry. Trying to rush things in learning the mountains is the best way to end burried in an avalanche or smashed into a rock imo. Backcountry riding requires humility.

Now you can totally become an instructor, work at a snowboard company etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I don't think you need to answer this question: just ride like you want to, train hard, go build stuff, if you like it and you'll see how things wraps out.

Now if you want an honest answer: nope, no ways and certainly not on the FWT, which is the discipline thtat requires the most experience out of them all. You can "cheat time" in the park by being incredibly talented at acrobatic stuff—and landing a 3 after two season is not that kind of talent—much less understanding the backcountry. Trying to rush things in learning the mountains is the best way to end burried in an avalanche or smashed into a rock imo. Backcountry riding requires humility.

Now you can totally become an instructor, work at a snowboard company etc.
I understand thanks! Although to counter this I’ve done my avalanche courses, I feel most comfortable when ripping down in the backcountry especially jumping off cliffs .. the reason I saw FWT is because I notice you don’t need ridiculous tricks to perform. Jumping off cliffs maybe a 3 or backy here or there is enough most of the time. Maybe i was too humble in my description tbh the cliffs i Jump are probably well over 15 feet and I learned a 360 in my first. 3 attempts on a large size jump not a little kicker .. also I still haven’t met a skier or boarder who can out shred me down a double black , moguls ect… I hate being cocky but this is the truth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I don't think you need to answer this question: just ride like you want to, train hard, go build stuff, if you like it and you'll see how things wraps out.

Now if you want an honest answer: nope, no ways and certainly not on the FWT, which is the discipline thtat requires the most experience out of them all. You can "cheat time" in the park by being incredibly talented at acrobatic stuff—and landing a 3 after two season is not that kind of talent—much less understanding the backcountry. Trying to rush things in learning the mountains is the best way to end burried in an avalanche or smashed into a rock imo. Backcountry riding requires humility.

Now you can totally become an instructor, work at a snowboard company etc.
Plus I already have my own business .. no I don’t have a trust fund lol.. I’m a 22 year old whose started his own construction business with zero dollars to my name at the time.
 

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Being a pro these days seems to be about marketing yourself very well. I heard mountain bike teams are dumping top riders to sponsor youtubers as they are the ones that bring in the money. So if by pro you mean making ends meet by snowboarding I’d say it’s not to late. If you mean pro by freestyle/natural selection type then yes, too old.

In saying all that, most snowboard channels don’t seem to exactly rack up the views compared to other talents like doing a ten second dance over and over or mashing your face into loaves of bread on tiktok. So maybe go that avenue to pay for your snowboard hobby.
 

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In saying all that, most snowboard channels don’t seem to exactly rack up the views compared to other talents like doing a ten second dance over and over or mashing your face into loaves of bread on tiktok. So maybe go that avenue to pay for your snowboard hobby.
That‘s so sad…
“How to XV” is one of the better channels out there, and XV is funny, charming and informative.
Yet his view counts are pretty much on par with Buckhouse.

Even then, 20k views probably isn’t brining in anything in terms of ad revenue.
 

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I was a professional motocross racer at 16...spent 5 years living as a broke-dick trying to make it.

Scrapped the dream basically on my 21st birthday, and went to work using the connections I made in motocross. Now at 32 years old I have built 2 successful companies, with a 3rd in the works.

I can't tell you how much happier I am now that I am financially stable. I can purchase whatever equipment I'd like, and travel to any destination to enjoy it on my own terms. All activities are much more enjoyable to me now: Motocross, MTB, snow etc. Financial freedom is so much more than the ability to buy some cool shit.

Keep pushing yourself - mastering a sport allows you to apply that same work ethic and principles to anything in life: career, relationships, other activities etc.

Also, don't overvalue your skills on a snowboard. At the end of the day, no one gives a shit.
 

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Ride and have fun. If you are gonna go pro, it has to be in randone splitboarding competitions or something where you can rely on your stamina and not your riding skills. Or maybe go pro on YouTube if you have some charisma. A lot of guys on here seems to think the current Youtubers needs some serious competition so they get ran out of business.
 
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