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Discussion Starter #1
First post and just wanting to make sure the sales guy is not pulling my leg. I just spent the last 4 hours reading different threads and learned a lot but need a little input. Please forgive me if my lingo is outdated, I am an older guy getting back into the sport after a 10 year hiatus. My stats;

43 yrs old
6'
200 lbs
size 12 boot
Will not do jumps, boxes, nada... just want to carve down the hill on a decent stick and enjoy times with my kiddos... Our primary surfaces will be groomed in CO, UT and CA

I was told that I should stick to a Flying V shaped board or a hybrid in the 162ish range. I am looking at 2 boards from last years styles; the Burton FV Custom and the Never Summer Legacy. Both are about the same price... For someone in my situation, am I looking down the correct path? Any opinion on one vs the other?

Any assistance and guidance is greatly appreciated. ~ Roger
 

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If you are spending most of your time on groomed runs doing some carving, I would consider something other than a profile with rocker in the middle, perhaps traditional camber or camber in the middle.

If you are getting back into it after a hiatus, camber in the middle with rockered tip/tail will be fairly forgiving, yet locked in when carving on groomers due to the camber in the middle.

Any reason you're only looking at Burton and NS? Perhaps look into Rossignol, Jones, and Capita.

For research sake, check out (but not limited to) these models:
Rossignol Krypto (or One)
Jones Mountain Twin
Capita BSOD
 

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Discussion Starter #3
If you are spending most of your time on groomed runs doing some carving, I would consider something other than a profile with rocker in the middle, perhaps traditional camber or camber in the middle.

If you are getting back into it after a hiatus, camber in the middle with rockered tip/tail will be fairly forgiving, yet locked in when carving on groomers due to the camber in the middle.

Any reason you're only looking at Burton and NS? Perhaps look into Rossignol, Jones, and Capita.

For research sake, check out (but not limited to) these models:
Rossignol Krypto (or One)
Jones Mountain Twin
Capita BSOD
Thanks for the reply. I am not locked into any board really... That is just what the local shop was suggesting. These are not huge shops. I guess I should also mention that I am in Dallas which is about 12 hours from the closest slopes, so there are limited resources around here for purchasing gear. Again any assistance and guidance is appreciated.
 

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Unfortunately, salespeople often don't know dick! Even in areas where snowboarding is prevalent! But in Dallas,... who can predict?? :dunno:

Seeing as you have been out of the loop for some years, I thought this reference link might help you narrow down exactly what you hope to get out of a new deck and understand what you are likely to want from all the new board tech available!

Hopefully, after some time spent with guides like this, and others found on this forum, you will be better equipped to sort the BS from the pearls! :thumbsup:
Cuz an awesome price on the WRONG board, is no deal at all!!!

snowboard community forums - Ippy's Snowboard Buying Guide - Page 1

Hope this helps! (BTW, I'm a recently new(ish) boarder and an older dude as well, 10 yrs your senior in fact! So the "lingo?" Gives me Fits trying to decipher and sort it out!) :laugh:

One last side note; I learned to ride on a full cambered, stiff as hell deck. Last year I demo'd a couple of Burton boards with the Flying V! I didn't like them!! For me, they wouldn't hold an edge in the turns! Washed out damn near every time! I'm sure the biggest part of the problem was probably me and my technique, but I do WAY better on a hybrid CRC or full cambered deck! If your really thinking of getting one, try to demo it first!
 

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Thanks for the reply. I am not locked into any board really... That is just what the local shop was suggesting. These are not huge shops. I guess I should also mention that I am in Dallas which is about 12 hours from the closest slopes, so there are limited resources around here for purchasing gear. Again any assistance and guidance is appreciated.
I used to live in houston in my middle school years. It seems like that you like to ride just like my dad, cruising down the slopes with your kids, and just wanting t unwind and relax on the slopes. I completely understand that. In my opinion, when I lived in houston, i went to my local "Sun and Ski Sports" to get my items. They didn't know anything. They were completely off on their information, and it was clear that none of them even snowboarded. Here in Vanc though, it is much better! Greetings, and a warm welcome to the forum.
Based upon the information provided, you may be good with a fully rockered board for ultimate forgiveness (this jus means it is harder to catch an edge (fall down)) with maybe some grip tech to maintain edge control. It is a good place to start. There is a company that specializes in rockered boards with grip-tech (grooves on the edge of the board to maintain edge contact). This company is called arbor snowboards. They have been in the biz for quite a while, and produce some quality snowboards.
Try out these boards:
-Arbor Element RX
-Arbor Coda
Good luck!
 

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A couple great replys from Chomps and Banjo already and I agree with both of them. I'm chiming in because I was in the same boat as you. I'm 43 and just got a new board after riding a old deck for years with the kids.

Banjo's list are some great boards to look at for starters, but if you have limited choices the Burton Custom Flying V and the NEver Summer SL and Legacy are both great all around boards and hard to go wrong with.

The sales guy at at the shop might have steered you towards the Flying V and the Legacy because they are new school takes on classic snowboard ideas which are actually pretty well rounded all around boards - you might actually be really happy with both of those decks.

I took the plunge and bought one of the new design rocker camber hybrid boards and freaking love the thing but it's a different brand than what you are looking at in Dallas. I was looking at the narrower model of the Legacy called the "SL" and if I had a Never Summer dealer closer to me I probably would have picked it up.

Another interesting Never Summer model is the Cobra. It looks amazing and is worth looking at as well.

In the end I think either one those boards your looking at will blow you away if you haven't ridden the new rocker hybrid boards yet. I would give the nod to the Never Summer if it was my choice.

Good luck!
 

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If you are spending most of your time on groomed runs doing some carving, I would consider something other than a profile with rocker in the middle, perhaps traditional camber or camber in the middle.
This would be my thoughts exactly. For groomers I like camber, it's going to offer the most edgehold despite what marketing says about hybrids (every hybrid camber shape claims it does everything well).

In the Burton line I'd look at a Custom or Process. Another one to look at would be the Prior AMF (all mountain freestyle). A little more money but it's got the RCR shape, would have good edge hold but not overly "twitchy"...
 

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Just my .02. My stats are almost identical to yours with the exception im a little older and have been riding now 10 yrs. I started late!

I love my Burton Custom Flying V. Hauls ass and is also playful. I also own a Burton Joystick which is a VRocker board. It is indeed playful and really hard to dig an edge on. If you are just donking around, that would be a good safe choice too. If you get your legs back and get moving a a bit faster, you will prefer the camber under your feet on a Flying V.

Anything you look at, pay attention to the waist width. As a fellow bigfoot, it is a challenge to find wide enough board widths. The tendency is to take you longer to accommodate that. Burton had me on a 162W for a long time, before I demoed a 158W. I realized I had been on boards too long. I ride mostly 157, 158 or 159 wides now.

One more that you may want to look at is the Libtech Skunk Ape. Similar profile as the Burton and nice and wide in the middle.

Once you make up your mind, do some net searching. You can get really great deal on a past season's new board. If stuck on Burton, you may also want to call each of there two outlet stores and see if they have something in stock in your size. Deep discounts there!

Good luck!
 

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I was on a train and needed to wrap up my post earlier. I just wanted to add basically it it depends on what you want to do. :)

If you want a playful board that carves pretty well, and will be kind of a kick as slow speeds with the family the hybrid boards are awesome. They are like jack of all trades, miles of smiles boards.

If you want a boards to go bomb with solo - or your family are all ready rippers and you can get some good carves in on the groomers when your with them a camber board might be the way you want to go. You really can't beat the camber for dedicated carving decks. That pop is hard to replicate.

The thing is that the hybrid board that I picked up (2013 Lib Tech Banana Magic) RIPS the groomers and carves amazingly well compared to anything from days past and I used to ride exclusively hard carving decks for years. If you haven't tried one of these new hybrid boards yet your kind of missing out in my opinion.

Is there a way you can demo the boards your looking at before buying?
 
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