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Discussion Starter #1
I will be looking for a second board for next season.

Some background on me:
60 years old. 165 pounds. Size 8.5 to 9 boot.
First year snowboarding, been out 6 times this season so far.
Will shoot for 12 sessions next year.
Local hill is Monarch Mountain in south Colorado.
My first board is a K2 HC161 I bought used.
I've mounted Flow NX2AT bindings on them and like them.

Style is freeride. I'm looking for a board that will support
advancing in powder, steeps, bumps and trees.
I favor versatility at lower speeds over higher speed capability.

Gnu Billy Goat 156 is at the top of my list.
This makes me think a gullwing profile,
Camber/Rocker/Camber is what I should look for.

Topics for discussion:
* Wisdom of used versus new.
* Boards to consider.
 

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Reformed Creep-o-saurus
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Gnu Billy Goat 156 is at the top of my list.
This makes me think a gullwing profile,
Camber/Rocker/Camber is what I should look for.

Topics for discussion:
* Wisdom of used versus new.
* Boards to consider.
Just my $0.02 of course, but I like used boards. As long as you check them out carefully then it's pretty hard to get a dud. Lots of money can be saved, and you won't care so much if you take it over rocks, etc.

One thing I've seen is some sellers will get them base ground and sharpened prior to selling. While this may be because they had lots of base damage and needed a grind, it also means the board is likely ready to go without having to invest money into. I recently bought a Burton Custom for $220, including bindings which I'll sell for about $70, but the edges were dull and it hadn't been waxed in ages. Still a good deal but it needed work right off the bat.

As for board types, if you're looking to do advanced freeriding (steeps, trees, etc.) I would suggest camber underfoot, with lifted tips. Something with an RCR profile, or whatever they call it. A lot of the Jones boards have this profile, Priors, and I'm sure there are lots of others out there.
 

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That HC161 happen to be the hideous pinstriped pattern that's like olive, maroon, and black stripes???

If you're only aiming for ~12 days per season, no harm in going used. You can get a slightly used (from this season or last season) board for less than 1/2 price of a brand new board, and at that pace -- unless you hit some rocks or something -- you will still be able to ride it for several years, easily.
 

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As for board types, if you're looking to do advanced freeriding (steeps, trees, etc.) I would suggest camber underfoot, with lifted tips. Something with an RCR profile, or whatever they call it. A lot of the Jones boards have this profile, Priors, and I'm sure there are lots of others out there.

Rossignol and Signal also use the Cam/Rock shape you're describing.

I initially was thinking the C-R-C shape would be OK but I notice he has an interest in steeps, trees and bumps and in all those circumstances I'd favor more camber so the R-C-R shape might be a better fit. With that in mind, I really liked the Signal Omni as an all-mountain board. I think the OG would be a step up in terms of big mountain riding, but the Omni would probably be a better fit for a beginner/intermediate rider.
 

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Smokin snowboards kt-22 is very similar to the gnu. Great all mountain free ride board. It's directional though with a built in set back. You can buy last years models at a great discount on their site. They are brand new still, in their "blow out sale" section
 

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Discussion Starter #6
That HC161 happen to be the hideous pinstriped pattern that's like olive, maroon, and black stripes???
LOL. Yes that's the one. It had been gathering dust at my local alpine shop until I showed up. It's gotten me out on the slopes and enjoying myself.
 

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Did it happen to have any identifying stickers on it?

I ask because I used to have this board, gave it to a friend back in 2003 or 2004. Last I heard he was still riding it in Tahoe ~2009 or so, and I think he is now living in Colorado.

I know it's a long shot, but what if you're riding my old board???
 

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Personally speaking, my riding in steeps, bumps and trees improved after switching from camber to Gnu C2BTX. Everyone is different, but to me it was night and day as far as confidence goes.

I weigh the same as you at 5'11" with size 8-7.5 feet. And after over 20 years of snowboarding I have come to the conclusion that a stiff flexing board is overkill for my specs and riding style, espcially with an all camber profile. I'm a 10% park guy 90% all mountain so it's not just riding style. I truly think a mid-flexing board is all I need to charge as hard as I want through anything I want.

I ride a Gnu Riders Choice which is about a 5 in flex vs the BG which I think is a 7(?). Demo some stuff and see what you think, but I think you'd be happy with a variety of the Mervin C2BTX boards: Riders Choice, TRS, Travis Rice, BG. Pay attention to flex rating and length so you get something that is different enough from your exisiting board. With smaller feet width can be a concern too. That's why I like the Riders Choice. It has a narrow waist width with the asymm pickle tech at the heelside. Makes it quick edge to edge.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
My first board is a K2 HC161 I bought used.
Can anyone tell about this K2 HC161? I guess it would be a traditional camber, but what would be the stiffness rating? How different is this from a newer camber with rocker tips style?

I still a newbie, but on the greens and easier blues this board is easy to ride at moderate speed. I'm enjoying dialing in different types of turn. Last time out there was 9" of new wet snow and another 2" fell in the morning. I challenged myself on longer steeper runs sections with moguls, after an hour it was chopped up and more difficult. I ended up with my rear leg burning and tired. I would like the new board to help in these conditions.

On a previous day with 20" of lighter snow I did not have to work so much on keeping the nose up.

So far, the c2btx type profile, is what I will be looking for. I'm not sure how to factor in stiffness.
 

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I don't think they have made the HC in over a decade. Specifically, if you have the one that I think you have, it is a 1995 model. Flex- or anything-wise on a board this old, and one that has been used as part of a rental fleet, is going to be tough to compare. Chances are the one you have is pretty beat up and broken down. The HC did have a full wood core in the mid-1990s though, which is good. A lot of brands back then were using foam composite cores that break down significantly over time.

In any case the HC would definitely be traditional camber - and that would be true even if it was as new as 2008 or 2009 (which again, they were not making the HC that recently).

The newere R-C-R style is going to ride a lot like traditonal camber, with a bit more play in the tips and should be a bit easier to keep "up" in the deep stuff. Nothing is going to completely alleviate that rear leg burn, except riding powder all the time. It's just a different use of the muscles, and for most of us, it's unfortunately infrequent :)
 

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I don't think they have made the HC in over a decade. Specifically, if you have the one that I think you have, it is a 1995 model. Flex- or anything-wise on a board this old, and one that has been used as part of a rental fleet, is going to be tough to compare. Chances are the one you have is pretty beat up and broken down. The HC did have a full wood core in the mid-1990s though, which is good. A lot of brands back then were using foam composite cores that break down significantly over time.

In any case the HC would definitely be traditional camber - and that would be true even if it was as new as 2008 or 2009 (which again, they were not making the HC that recently).

The newere R-C-R style is going to ride a lot like traditonal camber, with a bit more play in the tips and should be a bit easier to keep "up" in the deep stuff. Nothing is going to completely alleviate that rear leg burn, except riding powder all the time. It's just a different use of the muscles, and for most of us, it's unfortunately infrequent :)
Agree, the RCR really revived the camber as a core design between the insert. however i'm still not sold on the "floatability" of my camrocks(the greats and rossi angus)
 

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I will be looking for a second board for next season.

Some background on me:
60 years old. 165 pounds. Size 8.5 to 9 boot.
First year snowboarding, been out 6 times this season so far.
Will shoot for 12 sessions next year.

Style is freeride. I'm looking for a board that will support
advancing in powder, steeps, bumps and trees.
I favor versatility at lower speeds over higher speed capability.

Gnu Billy Goat 156 is at the top of my list.

Topics for discussion:
* Wisdom of used versus new.
* Boards to consider.
On the goat you got to be pretty aggressive on it...its a fun ride and shall we say "forgiving" if you are aggressive and charge...but not necessairly relaxing...it wants to take off and go...I'm 180, small feet and have a 159 split...got about 12-15 days on it...got it under control...but it wants to take off.

If you want versatility at lower speeds and advancing in powder steeps bumps and trees....go with a rider's choice in 154.5...its more controllable without having to be aggressive and is still agile/nimble and fast enough. Actually I'm going to try to pick up one used for more relaxed riding...btw I've also spent time some time on it.

edit...on second read...ur a newbie still working on blues and greens...get the rider's choice...the goat will take you for a ride
 

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Can anyone tell about this K2 HC161? I guess it would be a traditional camber, but what would be the stiffness rating? How different is this from a newer camber with rocker tips style?

I still a newbie, but on the greens and easier blues this board is easy to ride at moderate speed. I'm enjoying dialing in different types of turn. Last time out there was 9" of new wet snow and another 2" fell in the morning. I challenged myself on longer steeper runs sections with moguls, after an hour it was chopped up and more difficult. I ended up with my rear leg burning and tired. I would like the new board to help in these conditions.

On a previous day with 20" of lighter snow I did not have to work so much on keeping the nose up.

So far, the c2btx type profile, is what I will be looking for. I'm not sure how to factor in stiffness.
well on a 20" fresh ur just going to need something with some float...so 3 boards...groomer board, an rc or billy and a pow. The billy will blast some good pow but it is not a deep pow board...i'd say its limits is 16-20" deep on 40+ depreed slope...low angle...no
 
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