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Discussion Starter #1
Hello:

I currently ride a burton custom flying v and I love it for most conditions (soft-powder) except ICE. While I really do enjoy this board, I would like to have another board for crappier conditions or for harder pack days (think crappy east coast days).

I've been contemplating demo-ing the Juice Wagon since it is a camber board and seems better suited to cruddier conditions (I know it's supposed to shine on powder, too). Has anyone had any experience on the Juice Wagon on harder/icier conditions? Would it be a good complement to the Flying V?

Thanks in advance for your help!

G
 

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I would recommend something with magnetraction, something from Libtech or Gnu. It really does help a lot with icy conditions.
 

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This is my favourite kind of question, all I know is burton stuff.

I haven't ridden the juice wagon yet so can't comment beyond my guess based on what I've read.

I do however ride in the east and have Flying V and cambered boards.

My gut feeling is that the juice wagon's camber is in it's favour but as a tapered board with powder in mind it's probably not the ideal companion to your FV custom for east coast riding. This is without riding so it's only a thought. I want to demo that board myself.

I think your existing board covers the soft side of the spectrum, from burton I'd consider custom X, custom cambered, or cambered process to deal with harder snow and ice. Or used Vapor, discontinued but a great board for ice and cruddy conditions.

Part of the problem is that the customs are all round boards so that when you start making quivers with them they tend to not have an obvious second board. If you had custom camber then there's a whole bunch of fun choices for softer snow - juice wagon, antler, landlord, sherlock, trick pony come to mind.

I'm assuming you've got est bindings, if you have reflex bindings then there's all the other makers, I only know burton so can't help there. My personal combination for the Toronto area is Sherlock and Vapor.

In any case try to do a demo, and post here if you can, I've been thinking about the juice wagon myself and wonder how it would do on ice, groomers, crud.
 

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Yeah Magnatration will be ideal for icey days. I'd say a Gnu Riders Choice, but the camber profile and flex are very much like the Custom FV.

Check out the Rossignol decks with magna: One Magtek, Templar, Jibsaw. That would get you a truly different feel from your Burton with the Amptek profile R-C-R and MTx for grip. Plus they can be had pretty cheap which is crucial for a quiver.
 

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I would stick to a stiff cambered board... If you don't want to do burton u can try the lib tech c3 more of a camber board... I also like riding the burton harvest or cambered nug... I own a ride no4 164 cambered a burton fishcuit and a burton harvest... 151. So for the most part like my quiver of 3.. Only inch I really want now is a big pow board for the really deep days. Good luck
 

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All I've ever ridden is the Ice Coast, so I struggled with this situation for a long time as well. IMO Burton says their "Frostbite Edges" help you out on hard pack or ice, but I never noticed any extra traction. I'm calling their bluff on those.

I demoed a Rossi One MagTek w/magne and I really liked it. I was skeptical of the magne at first but once you get it out there it really passes the test. I couldn't afford to purchase at the time though, so I waited.

Ended up reading tons and tons of reviews of boards looking for my second deck, and bought a Capita BSOD on impulse a few months later. Turns out it's one of the best decks I've ever ridden. Capita doesn't have the Magne license, but they have their patented "Death Grip" which is like a poor man's Magnetraction. Basically there's one bump in the middle of the edge, instead of six or seven, that acts as a third point of contact. I can rail down a few of the iciest pitches I ride now without much hesitation. It's not going to dig trenches like Magne will, but as an alternative in a longer mid-wide board, I LOVE my BSOD.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Thanks for the responses guys. Much appreciated.

Lamps, I will absolutely let you know about demoing a Juice wagon as soon as I do.

I know that most people (including myself) don't like the flying v on ice, but I also wonder if it is because they/we are riding the board like a cambered board. Is there a riding style that is specific to flying v that would make it less sketchy on ice?

Also, since I have Cartel EST bindings I am mostly looking for a burton solution at this point. I know a lot of people aren't fans of the mega-brand, but my experience with them has been great thus far.

Thanks again for all of your comments and if any of you have ridden/demoed the Juice Wagon please do post your impressions.

Cheers!
 

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Thanks for the responses guys. Much appreciated.

Lamps, I will absolutely let you know about demoing a Juice wagons soon as I do.

I know that most people (including myself) don't like the flying v on ice, but I also wonder if it is because they/we are riding the board like a cambered board. Is there a riding style that is specific to flying v that would make it less sketchy on ice?

Also, since I have Cartel EST bindings I am mostly looking for a burton solution at this point. I know a lot of people aren't fan of the mega-brand, but my experience with them has been great thus far.

Thanks again for all of your comments and if any of you have ridden/demoed the Juice Wagon please do post your impressions.

Cheers!
When I ride Flying V boards in icy conditions I do three things: 1). Really commit to the edge so it digs in, 2). Press out with my knees a bit in the turns so the cambered part underfoot and towards the tips is more engaged, and 3). keep my edges nice and sharp.

This gets you ok but not great performance in hard/icy conditions, but it is a lot better than what I get if I don't do the three things above. A cambered board with nice sharp edges is best I find.

I don't mind the performance on ice, it's ok, I can live with it. The one place I hate Flying V is on well packed flats, I find the board sits up on its round middle and gets very squirrelly. My Sherlock is from the first year made, I heard that the newer shapes have more mellow rocker in the middle and it doesn't feel like you're on a balance board in the flats. Don't get me wrong, I really like the board in the right conditions, it way more fun than camber in soft snow and powder.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Great tips, Lamps. I'll keep them in mind next time I find myself on a sketchy ice patch for sure. Funny enough, I just got an edge sharpener in the mail a few days ago. I'll definitely keep sharp edges for icy VT days from now on :)
 

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When I ride Flying V boards in icy conditions I do three things: 1). Really commit to the edge so it digs in, 2). Press out with my knees a bit in the turns so the cambered part underfoot and towards the tips is more engaged, and 3). keep my edges nice and sharp.

This gets you ok but not great performance in hard/icy conditions, but it is a lot better than what I get if I don't do the three things above. A cambered board with nice sharp edges is best I find.

I don't mind the performance on ice, it's ok, I can live with it. The one place I hate Flying V is on well packed flats, I find the board sits up on its round middle and gets very squirrelly. My Sherlock is from the first year made, I heard that the newer shapes have more mellow rocker in the middle and it doesn't feel like you're on a balance board in the flats. Don't get me wrong, I really like the board in the right conditions, it way more fun than camber in soft snow and powder.
^ These things. ALL of these things.
 

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I don't mean to hijack your thread but I thought this question would be suitable here for you guys that have experience with the custom flying v

I'm currently riding a 2009 Lib Tech Skate Banana 151.

I live in Alberta(west), my riding style consists of mostly groomed and with some pow days. I will hit the park ever so often to attempt jumps and rails/boxes. But the plan is to get better at park as just free riding down the mountain can get boring. However I will probably do 50/50 still so I'm looking for a all mountain board that's playful and still got an edge to it for freeriding.

The skate banana was good but it didn't feel to be the most stable at higher speeds. It is a softer board and i guess more park oriented since it's a full rocker.

I've got my eyes on a 2013 model Burton Custom Flying V snowboard. I'll also be getting new bindings, most likely the EST Cartels.

Now the question is.. Anyone from from Alberta ridden the custom flying v and is it suitable for our snow conditions in the rockies?


Also, this particular 2013 model I am eying is a 148. Is this a good size for me if I am 5'5 and 140lbs? Since it is a shorter board than my current one, will this make it more unstable at higher speeds like my banana or will it be fine since its a hybrid camber-rocker-camber type deal. To my understanding, a longer board is more stable at higher speeds correct?
 
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