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almost the end of the season and im looking to take the wax off but i dont want to buy a wax remover, help?
 

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hot scrape= wax, scrape hot, scrape and brush all of it off.

Dont store boards without wax, the base will "dry out", when exposed to heat.
 

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hot scrape= wax, scrape hot, scrape and brush all of it off.

Dont store boards without wax, the base will "dry out", when exposed to heat.
I agree with the hot scrape method.

However, the bases drying when exposed to heat... it will take a lot of heat for that to happen, so, I wouldn't be too concerned about that aspect.

To add, after the hot scraping, I would do a nice penetrating hot wax coat with the same warm temperature wax... actually let the wax/base cool completely, slowly. Then scrape, brush, etc.
 

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But how in the world is a piece of plastics going to 'dry out'!?
If you have ever dug out an old board from a garage, you've seen it. When the base gets white, it is "dried out". People used to assume this was oxidization of the base, but it is just in fact the base becoming "brittle & dry" (like most plastics do). Once the base is "dried out", you can bring it back with several wax jobs, etc.

A bonus to waxing and not scraping for summer storage is you cover your edges as well which will inhibit rusting.
 

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Allow me to ask....why do your want to take the wax off? Aside from to clean it and re-wax that is? I would suggest giving it a hot waxing and store it up for next season without scrapping
 

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If you have ever dug out an old board from a garage, you've seen it. When the base gets white, it is "dried out". People used to assume this was oxidization of the base, but it is just in fact the base becoming "brittle & dry" (like most plastics do). Once the base is "dried out", you can bring it back with several wax jobs, etc.
Erm, nope.

A bonus to waxing and not scraping for summer storage is you cover your edges as well which will inhibit rusting.
Indeed. Alternatively, you can just cover the edges with wax.
 

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if you wax the edges, you can seal in residual moisture that can cause corrosion to the edges during storage.

though the nice thing about my Burton T6 is.... stainless steel edges.... I don't have to worry as much...
 

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the "brittle & dry" of most plastics is not due to the material oxidizing. It is more a break down of bonds within the molecular structure of the material, usually due to UV radiation. Additives to the plastic can be added to avoid this. The other part is localized friction, when you neglect to wax. This is more of a "base burn", again, the structure of the p-tex changes at the surface. Basically the pores becomes closed up. Waxing alone will not rectify this. You have to expose the structure again. You can try brushing from tail to tip with a steel or brash brush to open up the base again, then wax. If that does not work, then you'll have to get the base ground.
 

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the "brittle & dry" of most plastics is not due to the material oxidizing. It is more a break down of bonds within the molecular structure of the material, usually due to UV radiation. Additives to the plastic can be added to avoid this. The other part is localized friction, when you neglect to wax. This is more of a "base burn", again, the structure of the p-tex changes at the surface. Basically the pores becomes closed up. Waxing alone will not rectify this. You have to expose the structure again. You can try brushing from tail to tip with a steel or brash brush to open up the base again, then wax. If that does not work, then you'll have to get the base ground.
False. 10 char
 

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I've left a sintered board stripped of wax over the summer (used wax remover, did some base repairs and forgot about waxing it before putting it away).

As far as I can tell, there was no damage/oxidation or whatever, the board takes on wax just fine and glide appears to be the same as before (I always carry a hiking GPS, so I know my speed).
 

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Then what is it?
It (the white, slightly rough and dry appearance) is just what Ptex looks like without wax. And Ptex does not really degrade much, if at all (let alone oxidize or dry out) - certainly not in storage when it is not exposed to UV radiation or other extreme environmental factors.
And again, like mentioned many times before, there are no pores in snowboard bases.
 

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And again, like mentioned many times before, there are no pores in snowboard bases.
Which is technically correct, but practically wrong.

UHMW-PE aka. P-Tex is semi-crystalline and has amorphous regions, where wax can go into solution (wax is absorbed into the base). A higher temperature will allow a larger amount of wax to go into solution ("the pores expand").

Unless you are a materials scientist or nitpicker, pores are a rather good analogy for laypersons.
:D
 

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Which is technically correct, but practically wrong.

UHMW-PE aka. P-Tex is semi-crystalline and has amorphous regions, where wax can go into solution (wax is absorbed into the base). A higher temperature will allow a larger amount of wax to go into solution ("the pores expand").

Unless you are a materials scientist or nitpicker, pores are a rather good analogy for laypersons.
:D
I was just about to ask that because after reading his response I got curious and was looking online. Everything i have ever read or heard said "pores".
 

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Which is technically correct, but practically wrong.

UHMW-PE aka. P-Tex is semi-crystalline and has amorphous regions, where wax can go into solution (wax is absorbed into the base). A higher temperature will allow a larger amount of wax to go into solution ("the pores expand").

Unless you are a materials scientist or nitpicker, pores are a rather good analogy for laypersons.
:D
Great explanation!
 

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Which is technically correct, but practically wrong.

UHMW-PE aka. P-Tex is semi-crystalline and has amorphous regions, where wax can go into solution (wax is absorbed into the base). A higher temperature will allow a larger amount of wax to go into solution ("the pores expand").

Unless you are a materials scientist or nitpicker, pores are a rather good analogy for laypersons.
:D
Close enough - although it has been posted numerous times before, e.g., here.
 
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