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Been thinking of going over to see if I can find a job. Hopefully at an area but if not then maybe something like teaching English in a nearby city or smthg else. Terrain park would be my first choice but that might be unlikely.

Wondering if areas near Santiago would be better since there are more foreigners or if I should go south down to Corralco, nevados de chillan, Pucon, etc. Wonderif it would be best to go to a small mt vs popular one.
 

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Did you think this through any more than you did Hood, you still here? It's a great thing to live wild even at your age, travel, not get tied down, live life like a transient from one opportunity to the next. But theres a myth that people do that by the seat of their pants. The ones who do it successfully actually meticulously go through the steps and plans. They go where there's an opportunity presented to them, not one where they hope to find one.
 

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Being a certified guide with skills and stuff, or doing a complicated job for low pay might work, but trying to steal local jobs would be wildly unpopular. If you’re not actually a teacher, getting to be an assistant teacher without knowing the local language wouldn’t work. Maybe your best luck would be slave or driver for ski teams, but gotta find that before you go.
 

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Hate to say it but your plan is not a good one in that case imo. Things can be hard enough moving to a place without a job secured when you Can speak the local language.

That really isn't true. Many affluent Latin American families want their children to learn English from a native speaker. Same with Japanese. Spanish is incredibly easy to pick up. Your plan would be much MUCH easier speaking Spanish, however not impossible. My wife is from Mexico and I have several relatives who have done just what you are speaking of in Japan. Just do it.
 

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That really isn't true. Many affluent Latin American families want their children to learn English from a native speaker. Same with Japanese. Spanish is incredibly easy to pick up. Your plan would be much MUCH easier speaking Spanish, however not impossible. My wife is from Mexico and I have several relatives who have done just what you are speaking of in Japan. Just do it.
I don’t see how what I said isn’t true. To think it would be easy to just rock up in a country where you can’t speak the language, know nobody, and no job secured is daft.

edit: so after a 2 minute google search that you’d think op would have done, to teach english in chile you need a job/employer before you get your visa to be able to do that job on your tourist visa. Also, apparently most programs that hand out the jobs require you to be certified. But sure, sound easy plan.
 

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I'm just stating that to teach English as a second language you don't need to be fluent in the countries language. The visa requirements are a whole different story obviously. But hey, let the guy live on the edge a little, we've all done it! I'd opt for selling beer or coffee if that was my plan though
 

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I don’t see how what I said isn’t true. To think it would be easy to just rock up in a country where you can’t speak the language, know nobody, and no job secured is daft.

edit: so after a 2 minute google search that you’d think op would have done, to teach english in chile you need a job/employer before you get your visa to be able to do that job on your tourist visa. Also, apparently most programs that hand out the jobs require you to be certified. But sure, sound easy plan.
It would be easier to know Spanish but most tourist areas have a high % of English as a second language folks. Dropping in and immersing yourself in the culture is also a great way to come up to speed fast on conversational Spanish
 

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I'm just stating that to teach English as a second language you don't need to be fluent in the countries language. The visa requirements are a whole different story obviously. But hey, let the guy live on the edge a little, we've all done it! I'd opt for selling beer or coffee if that was my plan though
Right but I was saying in my original post that it’s hard enough when you can actually speak the language if you have nothing lined up so it will be even harder not knowing the language. This is why he is currently living in a tent. Unless you have lots of cash to drop to immerse yourself as elevation put it, shit just ain’t that easy.

Not trying to crush dreams here but as lab said, people that do this well go in with a plan. The ones that have no plan are the ones you see on border security and banged up abroad.
 

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Right but I was saying in my original post that it’s hard enough when you can actually speak the language if you have nothing lined up so it will be even harder not knowing the language. This is why he is currently living in a tent. Unless you have lots of cash to drop to immerse yourself as elevation put it, shit just ain’t that easy.

Not trying to crush dreams here but as lab said, people that do this well go in with a plan. The ones that have no plan are the ones you see on border security and banged up abroad.
100% fair point, I wouldn’t travel to another country where i don’t speak the language without having my gig and first month of housing figured out, don’t enjoy that much unknown, my point was only it’s not the end of the world if one does from a language perspective. I’ve got plenty of pals who have travelled throughout South America and have generally been able to pick up gigs (especially in the service industry at resorts that serve North American/European tourists) with relative ease if they are native English speakers

my biggest concern would be housing, dude should at least have some hostels lined up as he gets the lay of the land, based on his mount hood post I think he’s underestimating how much Covid has changed the ski bum lifestyle
 

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Been thinking of going over to see if I can find a job. Hopefully at an area but if not then maybe something like teaching English in a nearby city or smthg else. Terrain park would be my first choice but that might be unlikely.

Wondering if areas near Santiago would be better since there are more foreigners or if I should go south down to Corralco, nevados de chillan, Pucon, etc. Wonderif it would be best to go to a small mt vs popular one.
Do you have your TOEFL Certificate? You will need it for most jobs teaching English in a foreign country.

If you are under 30 think about NZ. They offer a 1 year working visa. All you need is a round trip plane ticket and 4200 in the bank. Hiring is happening right now and immigration is open to US nationals now.

 
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