Snowboarding Forum - Snowboard Enthusiast Forums banner

101 - 116 of 116 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,922 Posts
^ Two opposite opinions there.

To me it'd make sense for the Iguchi to be a touch more forgiving. A mellower parabolic camber with lifted contacts vs a full camber board with a stiffer tail, seems a no brainer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,248 Posts
Discussion Starter #102
I've ridden both and to me it was a no brainer. The FA was the more aggressive deck. But hey, I guess opinions very don't they.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
^ Two opposite opinions there.

To me it'd make sense for the Iguchi to be a touch more forgiving. A mellower parabolic camber with lifted contacts vs a full camber board with a stiffer tail, seems a no brainer.
I've ridden both and to me it was a no brainer. The FA was the more aggressive deck. But hey, I guess opinions very don't they.
Hm I guess I wasn't clear. Yes, for very mellow riding the Iguchi is more forgiving - same way that a soft rocker deck is more forgiving than a stiff camber board on groomers etc. But when doing more aggressive and challenging riding you reach the limits of the Iguchi much earlier and the board (just like a rocker noodle) won't 'bail you out' on an off-balance carve or landing like the FA will. So at that point you ahve to rid much more 'on point' and in that sense the Iguchi becomes less forgiving.

The thing with system camber is you can't quite shift your weight as far over the tips in a carve as you can with a normal full camber deck. You have to stay more centered over the grip tech.
That is one example of the limitations that I am talking about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
Ridden both, 100% agree. FA is a more aggressive deck. Guch gets playful as you
Get comfortable with it. The raised contact points take a minute to get used to, but once there, you push this board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
SG, it's not limiting, its adjusting to Tech. That's all. You learn how to ride it, and you forget that learning process quickly. Similar to CRC boards. Just takes a minute.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
SG, it's not limiting, its adjusting to Tech. That's all. You learn how to ride it, and you forget that learning process quickly. Similar to CRC boards. Just takes a minute.
Nope it's not. You are missing the point I was making. Some more extreme examples: A soft noodle rocker board is more forgiving when going slow/messing around, but less forgiving when mach-ing a backcountry cliff. Or conversely, my Carbon Flagship is more forgiving when charging dodgy terrain at high speed, but less forgiving when slowly cruising down a green groomer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
You are missing the point. The Guch has no limit but the one in your head. It's rider error. Said another way, I could ride a NS Evo in the backcountry and be just fine. You don't need a Dupraz to be the ultimate rider. I'm pretty sure Guch is a better rider than you, and he designed the board for AK and Jackson backcountry. Your head is the limit. It sounds like you need a really stiff board to mach. That's fine. They build em for people, that's for sure. But that doesn't mean if it's a little less stiff that there is a limit. That's rider ability and comfort. For me, the board had zero limit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
You are missing the point. The Guch has no limit but the one in your head. It's rider error. Said another way, I could ride a NS Evo in the backcountry and be just fine. You don't need a Dupraz to be the ultimate rider. I'm pretty sure Guch is a better rider than you, and he designed the board for AK and Jackson backcountry. Your head is the limit. It sounds like you need a really stiff board to mach. That's fine. They build em for people, that's for sure. But that doesn't mean if it's a little less stiff that there is a limit. That's rider ability and comfort. For me, the board had zero limit.
You're still not getting it: We are talking about whether a board is forgiving not whether it has limits. I have been in the backcountry with my Skate Banana too and it was fine/could do it. But the margin of error was less i.e. it was less forgiving. Same the other way around; Ryan Knapton butters a fat, stiff camber board without issues because the board is not limited, but it sure as hell is less forgiving for that application.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
You are missing the point. The Guch has no limit but the one in your head. It's rider error. Said another way, I could ride a NS Evo in the backcountry and be just fine. You don't need a Dupraz to be the ultimate rider. I'm pretty sure Guch is a better rider than you, and he designed the board for AK and Jackson backcountry. Your head is the limit. It sounds like you need a really stiff board to mach. That's fine. They build em for people, that's for sure. But that doesn't mean if it's a little less stiff that there is a limit. That's rider ability and comfort. For me, the board had zero limit.
You're still not getting it: We are talking about whether a board is forgiving not whether it has limits. I have been in the backcountry with my Skate Banana too and it was fine/could do it. But the margin of error was less i.e. it was less forgiving. Same the other way around; Ryan Knapton butters a fat, stiff camber board without issues because the board is not limited, but it sure as hell is less forgiving for that application.
You do realize you are redefining the term forgiveness? Because riding a stiff rocket, like that new aluminum board isn't more forgiving at speed. Also, id argue the dampness of the board would make your point better than the stiffness of the board. You might charge harder with a resin loaded plank vs a thin core board. But a stiff board being more forgiving? I'm not buying it. With a stiff agreesive camber ride comes technical riding, which if you are off, you will be punished.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
You do realize you are redefining the term forgiveness? Because riding a stiff rocket, like that new aluminum board isn't more forgiving at speed. Also, id argue the dampness of the board would make your point better than the stiffness of the board. You might charge harder with a resin loaded plank vs a thin core board. But a stiff board being more forgiving? I'm not buying it. With a stiff agreesive camber ride comes technical riding, which if you are off, you will be punished.
Check back in here when you have done some serious technical riding and charging in gnarly terrain. Then you will appreciate why a stiff board is more forgiving for that.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
840 Posts
I have. And I'll have to email Bryan Iguchi and tell him he hasn't made his board aggressive enough, and that he should call you when he gets to that level. LMAO. But seriously, the point you are trying to make is your theory, or probably your comfort level. You don't feel safe on steeps unless it's a stiff damp plank. It's like training wheels. It's okay man.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
579 Posts
See washy on carves is exactly what I'm worried about. I'm not even looking at full rockers.
I had concerns over how aggressive the FA felt and hoped the Guch would be better. Is a bit washy a sacrifice I have to make to get a more manageable ride?
One of the reasons I was looking at the Guch was because I hadn't seen any reviews that talked about washing out, they all said it was a really strong carver.
It's not washy. It absolutely rips. Fantastic board.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Difference between 2018 and 2019 model

Hello, i'm new to the forum, don't know exactly were to put this, so let's try it here!

After doing a lot of research (thanks snowboardingforum.com!:), i'm interested in getting the Arbor Bryan Iguchi Pro Camber 2019 board. But i think it is a little bit high-priced for 4 weeks of boarding a year...
Now i have the change to buy a 2018 model, that is 125 USD cheaper.

Is there a big difference between these models, like i said, i did a lot of reseach, but can't get a good answer to this question.

What do you guys think? Would the 2019 model be worth the extra Bucks, or is the 2018 model just as good and is it more a marketing thing (and they need to come up with a new board every year, with little to none tweaking...)?

Thanks for the reply's and greetz from Holland!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,922 Posts
What do you guys think? Would the 2019 model be worth the extra Bucks, or is the 2018 model just as good and is it more a marketing thing (and they need to come up with a new board every year, with little to none tweaking...)?
I don't know the specifics of the 2019 vs 2018 Iguchi pro, but in general there's rarely enough changes (if any at all aside from graphics) to warrant paying full retail for the current year model, if you can find last years at a good price. With only 4 weeks of riding a year, buy the 2018 and put the $$$ you save into a lesson your first or second day back on the hill. That'll set you up for a more enjoyable season than looking at a shiny brand new 2019 model :grin:
 
101 - 116 of 116 Posts
Top