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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, just joined and am looking for some info regarding this board. I’m 6’1, 200Lbs, 11.5 boot.

I Started snowboarding last year (I’ve boarded maybe 15 times) and am planning on going a lot this season. I’ve always rented boards and feel like I’ve got the basics down of heel/toe and am able to do small boxes and SMALL jumps. Mainly, I cruise down the local parks Around big bear and Southern California and Occasionally slide over a box or two. Once I get better I MAY attempt a small rail but have no plans of doing more than that.

Off the recommendation of an employee, I purchased the Arbor Westmark camber 159. He said although it’s a “park” board, it’s also good all around board that I can hit the local resorts with and have no problems improving with turns and basic skills. However, I researched after purchasing and it sounds like all the reviews say while it CAN be used for cruising/carving/etc, it’s for big airs, rails and technical tricks....

did I completely make a bad purchase or will I be alright with this board? Thanks for the info.
 

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Congrats on a great purchase. Its a great board to progress on. Given your style/level of riding, it sounds like a good fit for you. You should thank the employee for making a great suggestion.
 

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Destroying Worlds Since 2015
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At the level of skill you're talking about, you'll be fine. Reviewers almost always stress the primary purpose of a board and talk mostly about that, but most boards are better at one thing and can do most things. Unless you buy a park noodle or a downhill plank, it's all about compromises in performance. The only really perfect solution is to buy multiple boards for different conditions and different riding.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
So this will make a good all around board for a beginner getting better? Haha

Also, I have an 11.5 boot size and went with the standard width 159. Their website says 25.25cm (252.5?) at the waist. Will this be fine?
 

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Destroying Worlds Since 2015
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So this will make a good all around board for a beginner getting better? Haha

Also, I have an 11.5 boot size and went with the standard width 159. Their website says 25.25cm (252.5?) at the waist. Will this be fine?
That depends on your binding angles, stance width, and binding footbed height. All you can really do is set it up and look at how much overhang you have. But again, it's more of a potential problem at high-angle carving, and if you're low/intermediate, you won't be coming anywhere near that.
 

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Great board, cant go wrong. With 11.5 I would have gone 157mw. I’m 6’0 210 size 10.5 and that’s what I have. I usually don’t go below 254 WW
 

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Great great purchase. Amazing boards for progressing beginners and experts alike. With your size foot it is a tad bit slim but it depends on your biding angles. For example, a 0 degree stance will hang over much more than a fuck stance at 15 degrees. You won't be turning hard though as a beginner so your toes and heels should never touch snow. Set your bindings, tie your boot and strap them in without your feet in them. Then use a tape measure of any kind to measure from the "big toe" are of your boot to the edge of the board. Anything from 1-1.5 inches overhang on either side is acceptable (2-3 inches total overhang heel/toe). Your weight is fine for the board it's just width that's a concern. Remember, narrow boards are easier to control edge to edge and generally better for beginners. So if the board is a bit skinny (within reason) it's not always a terrible thing. There's always a market for these boards even used. If you don't like it you'll be able to sell it.
 

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Great great purchase. Amazing boards for progressing beginners and experts alike. With your size foot it is a tad bit slim but it depends on your biding angles. For example, a 0 degree stance will hang over much more than a fuck stance at 15 degrees. You won't be turning hard though as a beginner so your toes and heels should never touch snow. Set your bindings, tie your boot and strap them in without your feet in them. Then use a tape measure of any kind to measure from the "big toe" are of your boot to the edge of the board. Anything from 1-1.5 inches overhang on either side is acceptable (2-3 inches total overhang heel/toe). Your weight is fine for the board it's just width that's a concern. Remember, narrow boards are easier to control edge to edge and generally better for beginners. So if the board is a bit skinny (within reason) it's not always a terrible thing. There's always a market for these boards even used. If you don't like it you'll be able to sell it.
Lmao DUCK* stance
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Great great purchase. Amazing boards for progressing beginners and experts alike. With your size foot it is a tad bit slim but it depends on your biding angles. For example, a 0 degree stance will hang over much more than a fuck stance at 15 degrees. You won't be turning hard though as a beginner so your toes and heels should never touch snow. Set your bindings, tie your boot and strap them in without your feet in them. Then use a tape measure of any kind to measure from the "big toe" are of your boot to the edge of the board. Anything from 1-1.5 inches overhang on either side is acceptable (2-3 inches total overhang heel/toe). Your weight is fine for the board it's just width that's a concern. Remember, narrow boards are easier to control edge to edge and generally better for beginners. So if the board is a bit skinny (within reason) it's not always a terrible thing. There's always a market for these boards even used. If you don't like it you'll be able to sell it.
thanks for the reply. I usually have my front boot at a decent angle and the back boot SLIGHTLY angled to the rear. I’ll take a look once I get bindings and boots and maybe can swap it out at a local shop if it’s too narrow. Anything specific I need to look for as far as bindings/boots go?
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Great great purchase. Amazing boards for progressing beginners and experts alike. With your size foot it is a tad bit slim but it depends on your biding angles. For example, a 0 degree stance will hang over much more than a fuck stance at 15 degrees. You won't be turning hard though as a beginner so your toes and heels should never touch snow. Set your bindings, tie your boot and strap them in without your feet in them. Then use a tape measure of any kind to measure from the "big toe" are of your boot to the edge of the board. Anything from 1-1.5 inches overhang on either side is acceptable (2-3 inches total overhang heel/toe). Your weight is fine for the board it's just width that's a concern. Remember, narrow boards are easier to control edge to edge and generally better for beginners. So if the board is a bit skinny (within reason) it's not always a terrible thing. There's always a market for these boards even used. If you don't like it you'll be able to sell it.
thanks for the reply. I usually have my front boot at a decent angle and the back boot SLIGHTLY angled to the rear. I’ll take a look once I get bindings and boots and maybe can swap it out at a local shop if it’s too narrow. Anything specific I need to look for as far as bindings/boots go?
 

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thanks for the reply. I usually have my front boot at a decent angle and the back boot SLIGHTLY angled to the rear. I’ll take a look once I get bindings and boots and maybe can swap it out at a local shop if it’s too narrow. Anything specific I need to look for as far as bindings/boots go?
No problem, happy to help. I would look for a reduced footprint boot. You can reference boots using thegoodride.com they have reviewed hundreds of boots and you will be able to use their reviews to determine which boot has the best footprint for you as they have a special rating category for it. A reduced footprint basically means the boot doesn't have a bunch of extra rubber and packing on the heel and toe (which in your case could make your heel/toe touch snow). As far as bindings go they are all generally the same (s/m/l/xl sizing). The only company I'm aware of that has a completely adjustable two part base is Switchback Binding co. The Aeron bases literally come apart in two pieces and can be specifically adjusted to go back/forward on the heel side and back/forward on the toe side. I do own a pair of them and they are absolutely amazing. Best binding I've owned compared to Burton, Flux, Union, and Rome, can't speak for other brands as I have not personally rode them. Switchbacks also come in multiple high back and strap designs to suit your riding style, although the bases are all the same. Definitely worth checking out. Hope this helps! Ps. As humans we stand slightly "ducked" never with our toes perfectly forward, our snowboard stance should mimic this. I would recommend +15° to +18° in the front and -6° to -9° on the back foot. Generally each tick mark on a base plate accounts for 3° of angle.
 
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