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I've read multiple articles that the Rocker-Camber-Rocker profile is best for beginners to intermediates. I love the designs of Lib-Tech but as far as I can tell the don't have any R-C-R profiles? I'm looking to purchase my first board, but don't want to get something that doesn't lend itself to beginner riding just for the graphics design.
 

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they have boards for all skill levels. as a beginner don't get too caught up in the profile hype, they all have trade offs
 

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There are good arguments for RCR as beginner boards, but it's not like you will be going off slopestyle jumps and the most difficult offpiste terrain right away, so most beginner rated boards will be fine, regardless of brand.

Rocker in the tips absorbs bumps and a shorter camber under feet keep the control right there, while being easier to turn. Mervin boards take a little more balance in some cases, but you gotta learn that fast anyways.
 

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Many of us learned on full camber, stiff-ass boards. You can learn on anything, but in general the flex of the board is the most important factor for easing the learning curve. Less stiff boards are easier to turn and more forgiving.

The benefits of rocker really come into play when you're moving at more intermediate-level speeds. Rocker makes the board less "catchy" so you're less prone to catching an edge. It's pretty subtle in most cases, though.

Lib Tech makes a lot of boards with rocker between the feet. This can be great on soft snow to make turns easier, but on hard pack it can feel unstable, especially if you're new. They do offer C3 profiles that have little to no rocker between the feet, though.
 

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I wouldn't worry about RCR vs. CRC. The big thing with Lib Techs is that they have magnetraction. I'm not a huge fan of it. Magnetraction makes me feel like I am about to catch an edge at any moment when I am riding straight. Other people don't mind it. Some of the Lib Tech models also have a more extreme magnetraction than others.
 

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I love Lib Techs.

If this helps you...I was once an advanced rider. Then I took 10 years off. I'm now back on the slopes and I'm more of an intermediate and I'm riding a Lib Tech Quiver Killer. I love it and it carves very well. It's not super stiff and ideal for all conditions. This model might be a good fit if you want a Lib.
 

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The Lib Tech Skate Banana is one of the most popular boards to progress on and that is a CRC board. They make boards for all skill levels
 

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If you ask me, and nobody does but here it is anyway, starting on a board with some rocker between the feet is really going to ease the learning curve. Lib tech/Gnu has a lot of those and they do CRC best imo. C2, C2E in a flexible board are the profiles to look for.

If you get really into the sport where you're going to go more than five times a year, at intermediate level get a full camber board which will be much less forgiving but will progress your riding much faster. You'll feel every time you do something a little wrong on a board like that, but since you're intermediate you can recover.

After that, ride anything you want. CRC, RCR, full camber, s-rocker... It will be all about how you want the board to feel at that point, and you'll know what you like.
 

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I still got my 2014 TRS with C2X camber (CRC profile). The TRS doesn't feel like a beginner board at all.
They got three type of CRC, C2E, C2 and C2X.
It is my second Lib, love the magnatraction. My GF got a Gnu she like and my daughter a Banana Blaster as well which they like too.

But Lib/Gnu offer boards for all level of riders.

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My GNU Riders Choice C2 definitely felt like a much more advanced board coming from my beginner board Burton Clash. So I can see how a brand like Lib Tech can be perceived as for advanced riders. I felt that way as a beginner when I would see riders on Lib Techs.

The C2 profile on my Riders Choice really helped me progress in my intermediate stages and it was my Quiver of One for 4 seasons. I am a believer in really honing your skills on ONE board, before even considering building a quiver.

When I started going fast enough on my C2 board that I would wash out on long groomed runs that required hard carving (think Crystal Mountain’s long runs vs shorter runs at Stevens Pass in WA state), it was then I felt like I had earned and justified getting into a more aggressive board, such as a C3. That made a great difference for my progression into an advanced rider and getting faster & more fluid on the mountain.

As mentioned already, every brand has their varying shapes & profiles for all skill levels.

Amazingly, my almost 9-year-old GNU Riders Choice is still holding up and serves as my Rock Board nowadays.
 

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My EJack is an amazing board, and easily my overall favorite. But I guess the question is: is it an advanced board? Would a noob have trouble with it?

Honesty, I'd have to say no. It's hard to remember back to when I was just figuring things out, but I don't think it would have overpowered me. I do think I wouldn't have been able to take full advantage of it, until I got better. I guess that qualifies as an 'advanced' board, too.
 

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It's hard to remember back to when I was just figuring things out, but I don't think it would have overpowered me. I do think I wouldn't have been able to take full advantage of it, until I got better. I guess that qualifies as an 'advanced' board, too.
I started riding on a 163W plank of a board with no-name bindings I later upgraded to Burton Freestyle bindings. It's difficult for me to answer the beginner board question because if you're into snowboarding, pretty much anything will work and you'll be riding fine in 5-10 days. Some things ease the transition, but if that's a make-or-break thing I'd just rent boards or ski.

But my wife and daughters definitely learned faster initially on boards that were lighter and rockered. Trouble is, those boards held them back after they mastered linking turns at speed, and they all reached that point the first season. Nice thing for me is that they all got to learn on the hand-me-down rocker board so it was a good investment.
 

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My EJack is an amazing board, and easily my overall favorite. But I guess the question is: is it an advanced board? Would a noob have trouble with it?

Honesty, I'd have to say no. It's hard to remember back to when I was just figuring things out, but I don't think it would have overpowered me. I do think I wouldn't have been able to take full advantage of it, until I got better. I guess that qualifies as an 'advanced' board, too.
But for some people, if they get something way beyond their level, they can get discouraged and give up upon the board and not have fun.

What is good is get a new board maybe let say you're intermediate, but you get a notch over to get better and grow as a rider.

But with experience and years, when you demo boards, you get to know which ones suits your level and ones which doesn't anymore.



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