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I was reading a Wired mag today and came across this referenced article in which a skier was awarded $14 million for getting paralyzed after hitting a poorly designed jump. Anyone think it's the resorts responsibility to ensure jumps are engineered?

After a five-week trial, a King County jury on Friday awarded $14 million to a 27-year-old skier who was paralyzed after dropping 37 feet from a ski jump at the Summit at Snoqualmie.

Kenny Salvini, of Lake Tapps, was 23 years old when he went off the jump at the Central Terrain Park at Snoqualmie Central and landed on compact snow and ice in February 2004, said his attorney, Jack Connelly.

During the trial at the Regional Justice Center in Kent, "information came out ... that the man who built [the jump] eyeballed it with a Sno-Cat" rather than engineering a design, Connelly said.

Engineers and an aeronautics professor from the University of California, Davis, testified that the jump was improperly designed and featured a short landing area, Connelly said, adding that ski jumps are supposed to be sloped so that energy from a vertical jump is transferred into a skier's forward motion on landing.

"Going off this jump was the equivalent of jumping off a three-story building," Connelly said. "If you're going to be throwing kids 37 feet in the air, these jumps need to be engineered, designed and constructed properly."
Local News | Jury gives $14 million to skier paralyzed at Snoqualmie | Seattle Times Newspaper
 

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I would feel a lot safer in the parks if they were regulated and inspected to meet standards. I don't think each hill needs to hire an engineer, but rather engineers design approved standards that the hills build to. Consistancy between parks would be nice and that would acheive that to some extent. What I don't agree with is these ridiculousd law suits, I don't know the story but maybe this guy had no business hitting this jump and it would not have mattered how it was built, he was going to get hurt. The problem with regulating it is a lot of parks would have a hard time building the features and in the end the riders in a lot of areas would suffer the effect of more limited parks and higher lift ticket prices.
 

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^^^ Couldn't agree with Casual's post more. (You too VD lol)

I'd love to see more hills get properly designed jumps, at the same time I think the onus is on the rider to scout anything before jumping it.

What about the in-bounds cliffs that people jump off? None of them are "engineered". Some of them have rock fields in the landing zones!

I'm not sure how to get more resorts building carefully constructed jumps. Seems it's up to the park guys to build what they feel like, Lake Louise just seems to get it really right. Watched my buddy to that big step up the other day and I cringed at how fast he hit it. Landed right on top of the damn jump and rode away. :blink: I think you could safely hit that jump anywhere from 30-90 km/h and not get seriously hurt.
 

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I used to ride Snoqualmie and the only attraction at the mountain was the park. I find it hard to believe whoever made it did not know what they were doing.
 

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The problem with snow is it's always changing. Jump in the morning is different mid day and definitely different in the afternoon. There's a reason that resorts have mountain safety coordinators or directors that inspect everything.
 

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after 5 weeks and a full jury trial, i have to trust that, in this case, the mountain and that park worker were truly negligent somehow
 

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I think even if a set standard was made for jumps and features its still the person building it that really has the final "say". it could still end up with sketchy features, safer maybe but without a profesional to be there to take the time to make it or ok it it most likely will never be "to the standard".

I believe it all comes down solely to rider error, just becuase it was man made doesnt mean its safe. As said it should always be up to the rider to check out what they are hitting and declare it "safe" for themselves. However in this day and age, everything and anything will turn into a lawsuit if theres a way becuase nobody likes to take responsibility for there actions(disclaimer: im aware some situations are different then others).
 

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No, this is so annoying. For years our resort made hits that you couldn't overshoot. So you bombed it and barely made it. They did this because incompetent retards who wanted to be cool riding in the park when they had no business being there would get hurt on them. This scared them to the point of making things with idiots in mind first and riders in control, experience, and passion to progress second. They have been gravitating away lately and it's been nice. Just is now a huge gap from beginner features to advanced shit. Still sweetest set up around though.
 

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I thought that when you purchased a ticket/pass that there was a liability waiver? :dunno:

In any case these law suits are getting out of hand - putting yourself into that situation and blaming someone else for it.

The full jury award was for about $31 million, Connelly said, explaining that the amount was decreased to $14 million after calculating "the comparative fault" of his client and "the inherent risk of the sport."
Next thing you know, all the mountains start removing all "features" in fear of liability....
 

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I thought that when you purchased a ticket/pass that there was a liability waiver? :dunno:
waived...unless there was negligence

frivolous lawsuits abound, doesn't mean they are all frivolous

i mean fuk, the dude is paralyzed for life, life from 27? fukkn harsh. insurance is a racket anyway, i like to see em take a legit hit now and then
 

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after 5 weeks and a full jury trial, i have to trust that, in this case, the mountain and that park worker were truly negligent somehow
I wonder if the lawmakers and jury were familiar with "always scope your landing." Also, how the fuck do you get paralyzed if you weren't already attempting an inverted trick? I've seen people drop big cliffs into a barely covered rock field (oops), and while they were definitely injured, they were nowhere near paralyzed. Now if they had landed on their head... then totally. Urban riders drop buildings onto a 5 foot landing zone... I still blame the rider.

On another note, if the jury was made of snowboarders, do you think the same result would have happened?
 

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This is sort of old news around here, the jury gave that award back in 2007 and partially based their award on the fact that the resort didn't close or edit the feature after prior folks were injured to the point they had to be taken away on a sled.

At that resort now, you have to get a "park pass" to ride the park...which includes signing an EXTRA waiver. Although, my season pass for that place pretty much says I can kill myself and they are not responsible and it also has the basic park rules on the back...but I'm sure they are extra careful now...
 

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wild guess, but im sure the defense asked if he had scoped, sometime in 5 weeks!...if not, they deserved to lose
 

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Yup, hopefully this does not set a precedent or you are gonna see a lot of terrain parks disappearing (or at least toned down) from the mountains.
 

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There are certain expectations when riding in resorts. For example, avalanche control. If an in-bounds avalanche occurs in an area open to skiers and easily accessible via lift (eg. no hiking required), I think most people would agree that the resort could be held responsible.

And if you had a clearly marked tabletop with the landing so far out that it was impossible to hit the landing, even if you bombed it from the top of the park, that is clearly a poorly designed feature. Is it negligence on the part of the resort? I'd think so. Unlike natural cliffs and jumps, the expectations for manmade ones are higher. They're designed to be hit. A skilled skier should be able to navigate through terrain park features without getting injured.

To me it's a grey area. Yes, the accident could be avoided if the skier used better judgment. But whether the resort was negligent, I don't know enough about the situation to pass judgment.
 

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in case ppl's tl/dr kicked in:

""..... other people were injured on the same jump in the weeks before Salvini's accident, including a snowboarder who broke his back. A week after Salvini was injured, 19-year-old Peter Melrose of Bellevue died going off a different jump at the same terrain park, he said.

"There were 10 accidents with eight people taken off the slope in a toboggan" in the weeks before Salvini was hurt, landing on what Connelly said was a flat surface. In all, he said, evidence of 15 earlier accidents was admitted into evidence but "nothing was done" by ski operators to fix or close the faulty jumps.

The full jury award was for about $31 million, Connelly said, explaining that the amount was decreased to $14 million after calculating "the comparative fault" of his client and "the inherent risk of the sport.""

i would call that negligent
 

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Agreed. All those other injuries... I didn't realize this was all back in 2007. That is when I was riding there! It also explains why they were so crazy about the park pass... I would always sneak in from the trees.
 

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in case ppl's tl/dr kicked in:

""..... other people were injured on the same jump in the weeks before Salvini's accident, including a snowboarder who broke his back. A week after Salvini was injured, 19-year-old Peter Melrose of Bellevue died going off a different jump at the same terrain park, he said.

"There were 10 accidents with eight people taken off the slope in a toboggan" in the weeks before Salvini was hurt, landing on what Connelly said was a flat surface. In all, he said, evidence of 15 earlier accidents was admitted into evidence but "nothing was done" by ski operators to fix or close the faulty jumps.

The full jury award was for about $31 million, Connelly said, explaining that the amount was decreased to $14 million after calculating "the comparative fault" of his client and "the inherent risk of the sport.""

i would call that negligent
The people running that resort are retarded (and I'm not even talking about the park guys - although they sound less than talented at what they do). Seriously, do they have no concept of liability? At a certain point you think it would have dawned on them to do something. Amazing.
 

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Maybe stuff like this is why Wolf Creek doesn't have a park?

And maybe it's also why lift tickets are $56 a day there... :eusa_clap:
 
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