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So i've decided that this that i would like to tackle some easy back country stuff, I can comfortably Ride Black and i'm working my way up to Double blacks.

I'd really like to give back country a try this season, i'm planing on taking some avalanche course this fall. I do not have a sled yet, but if i like it that would be my next major investment.

I'm not looking for anything extreme, just something nice and tame, and not a crazy hike in no more than (5-6KM)

Thanks
 

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Take a level I, buy the gear. Probably around $800 usd to get the basics. I am sure there is a lot of killer stuff in your area. I think there are a couple of guys on the forum in the Alberta area who dipping their big toe into bc riding. Definitely something you want to partner up on sooooo...
 

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Like killclimbz said, before you do take a course. Even a Rec Avy course is a start, but you should really just get your AST-1. Grab a book by Bruce Jamison (ie: Free Riding in Avalanche Terrain - probably most suitable for snowboarders)

Find someone experience in the backcountry that can take you out there. This is essential - as much or even more so than that course. Even if you take the AST-1, don't venture out without someone with good experience as you learn.

Start with some "side country", lift-accessed backcountry. Remember though, as soon as you cross than thin rope, it's uncontrolled and just as dangerous as anywhere out in the backcountry. However these zones are often heavily sessioned so you can meet people who can show you the areas stately which is a huge advantage.

The best pre-season conditions will usually be in Kananaskis (Fortress Mountain, Highwood Pass, Rae Glacier, Black Prince, etc) - all often providing good pow turns in mid-October (even late Sept on a good year). Also, Parker's Ridge is another well known spot on the Icefield's Parkway.

The Rockies especially can be really touchy, with sketchy thin spots contrasting to heavily wind loaded slopes, all with super dry light powder. Plus despite most ski hills in the Rockies, the mountains are very steep. So the combination is there for higher avalanche hazards.

Not sure what gear you have, but a splitboard words much better than snowshoes in the region. They are expensive, but the way to go. If you only plan on going a few times, and they are shorter hikes, snowshoes will work (not here in Revy though - too deep)

Be smart and safe. Get the course, go with experienced people, don't jump in head first.
 

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There's enough slack country around Lake Louise to keep you busy.
 

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Hey Chupakabra man. Great advice. Sounds like you know the area real well and the sketchy snowpack we can get here around Calgary. If your around here this winter, please let Aleodonis, Torpedo and myself up. It would be nice to meet you. Cheers!
 
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