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Discussion Starter #1
I never ride with a pack, but I've decided I need to invest in some avy gear since I've been hitting the BC.

Any suggestions for a backpack that is good for carrying avy gear? I'm mostly wondering about carrying a shovel.

I don't want anything too big. I also don't need something real expensive since I won't be using it all the time. Only when the snow is deep and I'm heading out of bounds.
 

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The Dakine Heli or Heli Pro are nice. otherwise just take a look at the dakine stuff in general, you might like some of their stuff.
otherwise i just bought myself a camelbak snoblast. very nice and decent price.
 

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I'd get the Black Diamond Outlaw Avalung if I had the dough.
 

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I have the Dakine Heli Pro. I'd hesitate to go with anything much smaller. The Heli Pro is alrady cutting it close IMO. But, I'm like you in that I wanted something relatively small. Big enough to do the job, but not overly cumbersome.
 

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The Dakine Heli, Heli Pro, and Heli Pro DLX are all decent choices if you want to go the Dakine route. Personally I would go for the Heli Pro DLX since it has more back padding, horizontal board carry, and waist strap pocket. I have the Heli Pro and find it a little uncomfortable carrying a board vertically with the little amount of padding.

I've tried on the Burton AK 15L before and it's pretty damn small. The contoured back padding is super comfy too, but I think the pack is pretty expensive for a 15L.
 

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What type of hitting the backcountry are you doing? Sidecountry, slackcountry, backcountry, Sled access, hike access?
 

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I've tried on the Burton AK 15L before and it's pretty damn small. The contoured back padding is super comfy too, but I think the pack is pretty expensive for a 15L.

You say small, I say streamlined... ;)

It does actually have room for a large camelback bladder and plenty of stuff for a day outside. The shovel pocket is really well designed, and that padding is just sweet.

And yeah, it's very pricey -- unless you find it on end of season blowout for $30. Yeah I consider myself lucky on that find.
 

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You say small, I say streamlined... ;)

It does actually have room for a large camelback bladder and plenty of stuff for a day outside. The shovel pocket is really well designed, and that padding is just sweet.

And yeah, it's very pricey -- unless you find it on end of season blowout for $30. Yeah I consider myself lucky on that find.
Oh don't get me wrong, I really like the small/streamlined design. I'd love to pick one up, but the pricing is hOlding me back at the moment.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
What type of hitting the backcountry are you doing? Sidecountry, slackcountry, backcountry, Sled access, hike access?
good question, I guess that's probably a big factor in any suggestions.

Mostly sidecountry and slackcountry, assuming I think about those terms the same as you.

Most BC I will be doing is accessable from a lift (Alpental in Washington State) so I haven't needed to do any significant hiking for that.

Once I get the proper gear, I will probably venture deeper into the BC which may require more hiking.

I'd love to do sled access, just don't have a sled :(

So for me, carrying the board isn't as big of a factor as other things like comfort, size, price, and good spots for a shovel, probe, etc.
 

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What type of hitting the backcountry are you doing? Sidecountry, slackcountry, backcountry, Sled access, hike access?
I thought sidecountry/slackcountry were pretty much the same thing?
 

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Generally speaking, yeah they are the same thing. Resort accessed backcountry. Not everyone uses the same term for it. Just throwing it out there.

For the OP. I'd say for what you are getting into, a Heli Pro is a good choice for a pack for that purpose. Once you start hiking out more, you'll want a larger pack to carry a few more items. Food, extra layers, first aid kits, that sort of thing. A pack around the size of a Poacher is a good choice for that. Insulated hydration shoulder sleeves are a great feature to have on any pack. Water is a key thing to have in the backcountry.
 
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